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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2 O2 sensors on my 97 Duratec. Almost 4 hours. Rubbed the skin raw on my left arm, cut my hands up, cried a little. WTF did I do wrong? :eek:

The front was OK, but the back took me around 3 hours to replace. The scary part is, I still have no idea how I should have done it. My O2 sensor socket was utterly worthless. It and a ratchet were too long, butted up against something on the back of the motor (motor mount?) There was no room for a wrench to turn coming down from the top. The only thing that worked was a 7/8" line wrench from the bottom to break it loose, then turning it by hand from the top. Tightening the new one on was a nightmare; I know I was up and down 30 times trying to torque it down 1/32 turn at a time.

Is there a specialty O2 socket for this motor? I couldn't find any good instructions in either my Haynes manual or Mitchell's. There has to be a better way. I mean, this was 10x worse than an alternator replacement.
 

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On the upstream sensors, I just used the typical o2 socket. Downstream, I believe I ended up using a crescent wrench because I didn't have a large enough wrench lying around. All 4 may have taken an hour or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I guess I found my answer....

for $48 delivered I guess I couldnt beat that, especially being KD tools. I'll have it next week I suppose, hopefully I'll never have to go through that again.
 

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On my '96 'Tec, we came through the passenger wheel well, ended up taking longer that the front of course, but not too bad. Replacing the cat however totally sucked. Both nuts on the rear flange had seized. Ended up getting one of with a 12 point 14mm hammered onto the nut, and by heating the nut, the other one had to be cut and the stud extracted from the manifold. We reused the old studs where we could replaced the one we cut, and re-chased the studs with a die. We used all new nuts.
 

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2 O2 sensors on my 97 Duratec. Almost 4 hours. Rubbed the skin raw on my left arm, cut my hands up, cried a little. WTF did I do wrong? :eek:

The front was OK, but the back took me around 3 hours to replace. The scary part is, I still have no idea how I should have done it. My O2 sensor socket was utterly worthless. It and a ratchet were too long, butted up against something on the back of the motor (motor mount?) There was no room for a wrench to turn coming down from the top. The only thing that worked was a 7/8" line wrench from the bottom to break it loose, then turning it by hand from the top. Tightening the new one on was a nightmare; I know I was up and down 30 times trying to torque it down 1/32 turn at a time.

Is there a specialty O2 socket for this motor? I couldn't find any good instructions in either my Haynes manual or Mitchell's. There has to be a better way. I mean, this was 10x worse than an alternator replacement.
Don't know if this applies, but i had a bitch on my Vulcans rear under
the trannie hump O2 sensor.

Bought a special O2 tool from Autozone or such a few years back. it was a O2 socket attached permanently to a pivoting offset handle. So, the handle would hang down with the offset, where a standard O2 with mini breaker bar stuck into the top did not allow enough clearance to get anything done. This was NOT the common offset O2 tool that has a 3/8" offset square socket inlet on it

The under the car between the cat and trannie hump O2 was a real bitch. There was a time when i was having issues with the rear O2 that i though about putting a fooler circuit in place of the O2 sensor. Since the rear senor just monitors if the cats are working, i thought
i would just do this if i could not get it out. In the process of removal, i snapped the top off of it anyway.
 

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WJC, i feel your pain!!! Bank 2 (rad.) was a breeze, but bank 1 (firewall) was a real pita!!! Cant remember what combo of tools i used, maybe o2 socket, offset crowsfoot and/or stubby flex ratcheting 7/8 in.? Ive replaced the bank 1 sensor 1 o2s on 98 and 99 tecs and have sacrificed my share of forearm and knuckle hide too. On the first one, i think was up and down, but since then i think ive gotten to them sprawled across the motor mainly by feel. A little at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
On my '96 'Tec, we came through the passenger wheel well,
You know I tried that, but my extensions kept hitting the welded-on motor mount bracket. I guess Ford just didn't plan on anyone replacing the rear O2 sensors on these things. :rolleyes2:

Sadly, the trip to the country tonight to see family, 125 miles roundtrip, took almost 1/2 tank. And that was freeway miles. Absolutely disgusting. I don't know what else to do about the fuel economy on this POS. There's just nothing else to replace. I feel like I've put my heart, soul and wallet into this car and it continually turns around and kicks me in the jimmy.

Thanks for all the replies.
 

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Sorry to ask, but can you type out what you have replaced and what you have done to the car? Maybe a second pair of eyes can lend an idea or two. What kind of speeds are you doing?
 

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I made use of Advance Autos "Loan-A-Tool" program, to check out their O2 sensor socket kit & the stubby off-set socket was just what I needed to loosen & remove the bank 1 upstream sensor on my 94 3.8L.
It's in a tight place & that stubby off-set socket & wratchet was just the trick.

It helped too that the factory had applied a good anti-sieze to the O2 sensor threads, so the sensors came right out even after 14 years!!!!

The new sensors threads got a good even application of Permatex high temp nickel anti-sieze, so they'll likely be easy to remove next time too.
 

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Could you not just drop the exhaust cross-over pipe and remove the o2s on the floor and replace the exhaust gaskets on the install?

I have not even been under my car yet to look so not to sure
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I refilled this morning, 5.5 gallons in 130 miles. Just under 24, I guess not too bad for cold weather. I guess I panicked for nothing, stupid gas gauge. I'll keep a OCD eye on it. :p
 

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I refilled this morning, 5.5 gallons in 130 miles. Just under 24, I guess not too bad for cold weather. I guess I panicked for nothing, stupid gas gauge. I'll keep a OCD eye on it. :p
I know you've probably already checked this, but be sure to check the tire pressure. REALLY cold weather does all kinds of bad things to tires. I learned the hard way in my Lexus -- the tire pressure was off by 4 pounds per tire (nearly 15%). When I refilled to the proper level, my highway mileage went up by 1.3 mpg.

Now I don't laugh when I see the signs at my local Exxon that say "America loses 700 million gallons of gasoline each year to improper tire pressure."
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
As a final comment, my 97 Duratec seems to be back around 24 mpg mixed driving. Perfectly fine by me.

What started this rapid drop in fuel economy (I suspect) was the Seafoaming of my intake last winter after doing intake gaskets and emission hoses. I think the Seafoam contaminated the O2 sensors, so I will be very cautious using it in FI vehicles from now on. Previously I've used it with great success in small engines and carbureted cars, so I am still a Seafoam fan, but a more careful one.
 

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As a final comment, my 97 Duratec seems to be back around 24 mpg mixed driving. Perfectly fine by me.

What started this rapid drop in fuel economy (I suspect) was the Seafoaming of my intake last winter after doing intake gaskets and emission hoses. I think the Seafoam contaminated the O2 sensors, so I will be very cautious using it in FI vehicles from now on. Previously I've used it with great success in small engines and carbureted cars, so I am still a Seafoam fan, but a more careful one.
A lot of the time i do work on the car, its do multiple things at once
rather than do one task then check the mileage. So, its hard to tell what changed one way or the other when your doing more than one thing to the car at once.

I know on my Gen3 vulcan, in the freezing cold now in Nebraska i would be lucky to be getting 16/17 in town. I use the ethanol mix which probably
cuts down that total some.

Both of my higher mileage Vulcan GEN3's seem to only get 23/24 max on the Hi-way.

The best i ever got was 29MPG on my 93 wagon Vulcan on a flat Hi-way.
My GEN3's have never matched that.

When i check mileage, i fill up until the auto shut off on the pump clicks
off and then i stop filling. I reset the tripometer. drive. Then refill to the first click on the pump shut off again. take the miles on the tripometer and
divide by the gallons on the refill.

Some people pull mileage figures out of there rears. My brother in law
(who is a good mechanic) seems to do this. He got a 96 4x4 suburban
and told me it would get 15/16 MPG in town. I told him he would be lucky
to get 11/13 in town in that heavy high beast. After having it for awhile,
i think the reality set in for him.

What i would like to see is a sensor by sensor and problem change on a higher mileage car and check mileage after each repair. I am curious how much difference a gummed up intake would make. Or EGR. Then after all else was done, new O2 sensors

bob
 

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A lot of the time i do work on the car, its do multiple things at once
rather than do one task then check the mileage. So, its hard to tell what changed one way or the other when your doing more than one thing to the car at once.

I know on my Gen3 vulcan, in the freezing cold now in Nebraska i would be lucky to be getting 16/17 in town. I use the ethanol mix which probably
cuts down that total some.

Both of my higher mileage Vulcan GEN3's seem to only get 23/24 max on the Hi-way.

The best i ever got was 29MPG on my 93 wagon Vulcan on a flat Hi-way.
My GEN3's have never matched that.

When i check mileage, i fill up until the auto shut off on the pump clicks
off and then i stop filling. I reset the tripometer. drive. Then refill to the first click on the pump shut off again. take the miles on the tripometer and
divide by the gallons on the refill.

Some people pull mileage figures out of there rears. My brother in law
(who is a good mechanic) seems to do this. He got a 96 4x4 suburban
and told me it would get 15/16 MPG in town. I told him he would be lucky
to get 11/13 in town in that heavy high beast. After having it for awhile,
i think the reality set in for him.

What i would like to see is a sensor by sensor and problem change on a higher mileage car and check mileage after each repair. I am curious how much difference a gummed up intake would make. Or EGR. Then after all else was done, new O2 sensors

bob
I'm managing about 15/16 mpg according to the gauge in my Windstar. That's pretty much entirely in town driving. It's averaging around 15f at most, down to 0f in my area. I idle for 30 seconds, sometimes longer on cold starts and leave it running for warmth in a lot of situations where I'd turn it off. I wonder how accurate it is, I should calculate it out someday.
 
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