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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Greetings. I have a 2001 Ford Taurus SE with 74,000 original miles.
I just replaced the passenger door lock actuator (pain in the a**). So now all four doors will unlock.....but they won't lock.
So my wiring is good.....it appears that I have a "relay" problem.
So my "unlock" relay works perfectly, but my lock relay is fried.
The question is where is the freaking $#%*&! lock relay?
When I push the lock switch, I can hear and feel something clicking inside the main fuse block under the dashboard. Behind the main fuse block is the GEM module.
How do I know this? Because I've ripped everything out looking for the clicking noise. Guess what I found? NINE, yes NINE hidden micro relays soldered to the main board. No, the relays are NOT inside the GEM module.
The nine micro relays are hidden directly behind the fuses inside the fuse block.
These hidden micro relays are not mentioned on ANY Ford manual. As far I can research on Google, no one has ever found these damned things.
Why did Ford do this? Who the hell knows. They could have just made the fuse block just a little wider and added all nine separate plug-in style relays and saved all of us weeks of cursing, sleepless nights, frustration, and heavy drinking. What is really amazing is that there is NOTHING on the Internet that speaks of these relays or mentions where they are. I can't even find a pic of this anywhere.
The micro relays are soldered to the board so your best bet is to go to the junk yard and get another fuse block and try your luck.
Ok, take a look at the pictures.....

Pic 1 shows nine micro relays that are soldered to the circuit board.
Pic 2 shows the front of the fuse block.
Pic 3 shows the back cover of the fuse block (with the GEM removed first). There are no less than 12 tabs holding the back cover on the fuse block. You will have to use a small flat-tip screwdriver to press each tab and gently pull the cover off. It's a pain in the a**.

Now, if you zoom in and look closely, each of the nine micro relays are named. From left to right, top to bottom:
1) WASHER
2) HORN
3) PARK
4) HEAD
5) DV-RUN-LOCK (single small relay in the middle)
6) ALL-LOCK (this is the relay that is fried)
7) UNLOCK
8) BATT-SVR
9) LAMPS


Enjoy!

Cheers, OldOG
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I am making progress! I replaced my entire fuse block with a junk yard unit from a Mercury Sable and guess what? My door locks work perfectly now. All four doors lock and unlock with authority LOL.
My next project is fixing the cruise control....

OldOG
 

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Wow, this is pretty useful, thank you. Some guy recently had an issue with interior lights, and I saw the wiring diagrams showing that there is a "battery saver relay" that controls power to internal lights. Though there is never any location given for that "battery saver relay" either. At least it is printed on the circuit board.
 

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Those relays are nothing special.... just standard 12 V SPDT relays.

Assuming the circuit board is a single layer board, the bad relay can be unsoldered and a new 12 V SPDT small relay can be soldered in if you can find the correct pin configuration. If you cant find a relay with the correct pin configuration, you can solder wires to the circuit board and bring them out of the GEM/SJB and mount the relay external to the GEM/SJB. Ebay has many many types of relays dirt cheap. Never done a repair like this on a GEM/SJB, but I have done this type of repair on many different electronic devices over the last 50 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Once you unplug all the fuses and relays from the other side, the circuit board can be removed.
Unfortunately not everyone is familiar with unsoldering and re-soldering components. A small butane torch makes fast work of removing the bad relay.
 
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