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I want to upgrade wires for my fron speakers in my doors. How do I do that? Anyone done it before? Do I just fish the new wire through whatever hole I can find, or is there some other way?
 

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Originally posted by apolinaras@Jun 29 2004, 05:21 PM
I want to upgrade wires for my fron speakers in my doors. How do I do that? Anyone done it before? Do I just fish the new wire through whatever hole I can find, or is there some other way?
Why do you want to upgrade the wire? It is a waste of time to go thru the hassle.
 

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Larger gauge/higher quality wire transfers a better signal than the standard 18 gauge cable.

If you're running aftermarket speakers in the front with a dedicated amplifier for them, new wires may help a bit, but if you're sticking with the factor speakers and/or relying on your HU for power, it will be a waste of time IMO.
 

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I'm running all new to wire from dedicated amps. The driver's door has large connector near the hinge, so if the door is removed (or installed) rather than disconnect many wires or harness clips, only one large connector needs to be disconnected.

Here is a pic of how I modified mine. It works perfectly.
 

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Originally posted by golovko@Jun 30 2004, 08:15 AM
Larger gauge/higher quality wire transfers a better signal than the standard 18 gauge cable.

If you're running aftermarket speakers in the front with a dedicated amplifier for them, new wires may help a bit, but if you're sticking with the factor speakers and/or relying on your HU for power, it will be a waste of time IMO.
Not true. A company did some research and found that the only benefit for upgraded wires and "monster"cables were at the 100K Kh range and above. Now, I don't know anybody that can really hear above the 20Kh range, so the upgrade for the most part any any application is a waste of time. I have dedicated amps to my front and rear stage and I am running stock speaker wire. If you had and old beater I would suggest swapping it all out just because of the ease factor, but these new cars are a bear to do that to.
 

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I did not like the fact that there is about 40' of wire between my head unit and speakers after installing an aftermarket stereo. The installation kit add another 20' of wire to the system.

I found the sound to be improved, but installation is not the easiest on the Taurus.
 

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Originally posted by 12Volt_rep@Jun 30 2004, 05:49 PM
Not true. A company did some research and found that the only benefit for upgraded wires and "monster"cables were at the 100K Kh range and above. Now, I don't know anybody that can really hear above the 20Kh range, so the upgrade for the most part any any application is a waste of time. I have dedicated amps to my front and rear stage and I am running stock speaker wire. If you had and old beater I would suggest swapping it all out just because of the ease factor, but these new cars are a bear to do that to.
What company? What were the testing conditions and configurations?

Actually, it is true. The main problem posed by speaker wires is the fact that they are an additional link between the point of amplification and the driver - ie added resistance. Resistance is proportional to length and inversly proportional to area (read: gauge). By decreasing the length (running new wires in a more direct manner) and increasing the gauge (increasing the area through which the signal has to transfer through), the overall resistance between the point of amplification and the driver will be decreased. By decreasing the resistance, more power will be able to get to the driver (better signal) and less power will be dissipated as heat along the way.
 

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Originally posted by golovko+Jun 30 2004, 10:12 PM--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (golovko @ Jun 30 2004, 10:12 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-12Volt_rep@Jun 30 2004, 05:49 PM
Not true. A company did some research and found that the only benefit for upgraded wires and "monster"cables were at the 100K Kh range and above. Now, I don't know anybody that can really hear above the 20Kh range, so the upgrade for the most part any any application is a waste of time. I have dedicated amps to my front and rear stage and I am running stock speaker wire. If you had and old beater I would suggest swapping it all out just because of the ease factor, but these new cars are a bear to do that to.
What company? What were the testing conditions and configurations?

Actually, it is true. The main problem posed by speaker wires is the fact that they are an additional link between the point of amplification and the driver - ie added resistance. Resistance is proportional to length and inversly proportional to area (read: gauge). By decreasing the length (running new wires in a more direct manner) and increasing the gauge (increasing the area through which the signal has to transfer through), the overall resistance between the point of amplification and the driver will be decreased. By decreasing the resistance, more power will be able to get to the driver (better signal) and less power will be dissipated as heat along the way. [/b][/quote]
Let's just say it was one of the largest electronic manufacturers in the world and leave it at that. The conditions? I am sure this company knows what they are doing. The reason they did the test was to see if they should include larger guage wires in their packaging, not to prove someone or something wrong. 100K kh and above was the only improved area.


Let's take that train of thought and look at it like this. Why not run 4 gauge wire to every speaker in the car? Wouldn't that be as good as you can get? I respect you and what you are saying, but I disagree with it whole heartedly. Text books will never take the place of real world applications. I have installed hundreds of mobile systems and have only a handful of times upgraded the wires. I have installed several home systems and have never used the sworn by "monster" cable, and they have always sounded great.

This will probably go the way of the great "cap" debate. I will say one thing and you will say another and it will go on and on and on and on and on...........

Until we can conduct our own study I guess we will have to agree to disagree.
 

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Originally posted by 12Volt_rep@Jul 1 2004, 08:43 AM
Let's take that train of thought and look at it like this. Why not run 4 gauge wire to every speaker in the car? Wouldn't that be as good as you can get? I respect you and what you are saying, but I disagree with it whole heartedly. Text books will never take the place of real world applications. I have installed hundreds of mobile systems and have only a handful of times upgraded the wires. I have installed several home systems and have never used the sworn by "monster" cable, and they have always sounded great.
Increasing the gauge only works to a point, there are other barriers for which the signal must cross, such as the connection between the wire and driver, crossovers, etc. The point is to get the most efficiency out of the power that the amp is producing.

Don't forget, textbooks are the basis for real world applications. Without the theory and design, there would be no application to analyze.

This will probably go the way of the great "cap" debate. I will say one thing and you will say another and it will go on and on and on and on and on...........
Good point, it probably would.

Until we can conduct our own study I guess we will have to agree to disagree.
Now that I can agree on :thumb:
 

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The now defunct Audio magazine had a great article on wiring and performance.

And there is no doubt that improving the wiring will improve the sound, under a great many conditions.

Resistance is a big problem and they found that keeping it under .1 Ohm/ft (I think that was the figure) meant that additional lengths would not affect the audiable frequency response. Increasing the resistance made for audiable effects, none of them pleasant.

Try replacing the OEM wiring (18ga?) with 22ga and see if you don't hear a difference. I think may will.

The testing was done with stranded copper wire, nothing fancy. I don't recommend Monster speaker wire as 12ga lamp cord is much cheap, if not nearly as sexy.

Increase the length of the speaker wire run enough, and you should increase the gauge. If the run is short and the gauge is large, than replacing it with a larger gauge may not make any difference at all. The idea is to preserve that minimal resistance point as the runs increase.
 

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Couldnt you also just run wire thru the door, thru the firewall, and then under the carpet?
 

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Originally posted by 12Volt_rep+Jul 1 2004, 08:43 AM--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (12Volt_rep @ Jul 1 2004, 08:43 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>
Originally posted by [email protected] 30 2004, 10:12 PM
<!--QuoteBegin-12Volt_rep
@Jun 30 2004, 05:49 PM
Not true. A company did some research and found that the only benefit for upgraded wires and "monster"cables were at the 100K Kh range and above. Now, I don't know anybody that can really hear above the 20Kh range, so the upgrade for the most part any any application is a waste of time. I have dedicated amps to my front and rear stage and I am running stock speaker wire. If you had and old beater I would suggest swapping it all out just because of the ease factor, but these new cars are a bear to do that to.

What company? What were the testing conditions and configurations?

Actually, it is true. The main problem posed by speaker wires is the fact that they are an additional link between the point of amplification and the driver - ie added resistance. Resistance is proportional to length and inversly proportional to area (read: gauge). By decreasing the length (running new wires in a more direct manner) and increasing the gauge (increasing the area through which the signal has to transfer through), the overall resistance between the point of amplification and the driver will be decreased. By decreasing the resistance, more power will be able to get to the driver (better signal) and less power will be dissipated as heat along the way.
Let's just say it was one of the largest electronic manufacturers in the world and leave it at that. The conditions? I am sure this company knows what they are doing. The reason they did the test was to see if they should include larger guage wires in their packaging, not to prove someone or something wrong. 100K kh and above was the only improved area.


Let's take that train of thought and look at it like this. Why not run 4 gauge wire to every speaker in the car? Wouldn't that be as good as you can get? I respect you and what you are saying, but I disagree with it whole heartedly. Text books will never take the place of real world applications. I have installed hundreds of mobile systems and have only a handful of times upgraded the wires. I have installed several home systems and have never used the sworn by "monster" cable, and they have always sounded great.

This will probably go the way of the great "cap" debate. I will say one thing and you will say another and it will go on and on and on and on and on...........

Until we can conduct our own study I guess we will have to agree to disagree. [/b][/quote]
12v is right..replacing speaker wire will not improve much...you probably wouldnt even notice a difference to be honest..
 
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