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I followed these instructions several months ago when my car was at 80k. The tranny has been serviced professionally every 25-30k previously....

The transmission shifts like new and still gets regular abuse. I used Mobil 1 synthetic transmission fluid and have had no problems. I am at 91k as of today. I pulled the dispstick a couple days ago, and the fluid is bright pink without the burned smell. I looks brand new. I also have a 18,000 GVW tranny cooler and Magnefine in-line filter.
 

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cowspotter: Why would you take the car for a test drive before you checked the fluid level?

spridget: How much do you pay for a mobil 1 flush? I think the shop in my neighborhood is trying to screw me because they said they wanted $200 for a M1 flush. I was a little insulted and haven't been back since.


I keep reading posts about people who have added a cooler saying that their tranny shifts better, but mine usually shifts better once the fluid heats up. Is that normal? I know the fluid will last longer if you keep it cool, but mine shifts harder and faster when the fluid is hot.
 

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The trans does shift better once the fluid heats up, because it needs to get to its optimal operating temp, just like the engine does. I was originally going to bypass the stock cooler altogether, but after speaking with my gf's dad, he told me that the transmission needs to get to optimal temp as fast as possible, and if you bypass the stock cooler altogether, the fluid won't warm up as fast, since it's not drawing heat from the engine. That said, just beacuse the cooler is lowering the temp of the fluid doesn't mean that it's dropping it down to 0 or anything. The fluid will still be in optimal operating range, but it will be cooler (in that range), prolonging the life of the fluid, as well as the transmission.

JR
 

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These transmissions are known for failing mostly because of overheating transmission fluid. The stock coolers can not keep the fluid in the right temp range. The addition of a stock cooler will keep the fluid where it should be. This will also keep the fluid from burning.
 

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Originally posted by godspunk32@Jun 6 2005, 09:22 AM
The trans does shift better once the fluid heats up, because it needs to get to its optimal operating temp, just like the engine does. I was originally going to bypass the stock cooler altogether, but after speaking with my gf's dad, he told me that the transmission needs to get to optimal temp as fast as possible, and if you bypass the stock cooler altogether, the fluid won't warm up as fast, since it's not drawing heat from the engine.
Do I understand correctly that you're saying bypassing the stock cooler is bad because the ATF isn't being heated in the radiator by hot engine coolant?
 

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Originally posted by sfontain+Jun 6 2005, 09:37 AM--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (sfontain @ Jun 6 2005, 09:37 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-godspunk32@Jun 6 2005, 09:22 AM
The trans does shift better once the fluid heats up, because it needs to get to its optimal operating temp, just like the engine does.  I was originally going to bypass the stock cooler altogether, but after speaking with my gf's dad, he told me that the transmission needs to get to optimal temp as fast as possible, and if you bypass the stock cooler altogether, the fluid won't warm up as fast, since it's not drawing heat from the engine.
Do I understand correctly that you're saying bypassing the stock cooler is bad because the ATF isn't being heated in the radiator by hot engine coolant? [/b][/quote]
Correct. The heat from the engine coolant helps the transmission fluid get to its optimal operating temperature faster, and the use of the cooler keeps the fluid from getting too hot, as the stock cooler will not do.

JR
 

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Discussion Starter #48
The radiator cooler will not help shorten the time it takes to heat up the coolant to any measurable extent. The coolant in the radiator is not the temp that the coolant is in the motor. Once the t-stat starts to open it will still take a long time for the coolant in the radiator to get above 150F or so. If the coolant in the radiator was much above 150F at anytime it would be very hard to regulate the internal engine coolant temp at around 195F.

I have my radiator cooler bypassed but it is only because I replaced the radiator and did not want to deal with the hassle of ever messing with those hoses again.

Last winter I tested the tranny fluid temps with the radiator cooler in the loop and without. It made such a small difference I would no worry about it. With stop and go driving in town the fluid will heat up just fine. If gong immediately out on to the highway in the winter you need a t-stat in the system as it will seldom get above 140F. Of course this is assuming you are using synthetic fluid which is good at 200F. Dino fluid you would want to keep below that or change it much more often. Certainly not the 30K Ford recommends.
 

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Originally posted by godspunk32@Jun 6 2005, 09:51 AM
Correct. The heat from the engine coolant helps the transmission fluid get to its optimal operating temperature faster, and the use of the cooler keeps the fluid from getting too hot, as the stock cooler will not do.

JR
How long do you think it takes for the ATF to get to operating temperature?

I'm just surprised by the theory because hot coolant doesn't flow through the radiator to heat the ATF until the coolant itself is hot and the thermostat opens, by which time the ATF is already quite toasty from friction and radiant engine heat.
 

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I flushed the ATX on the SHO two weeks ago. I was going to take pics, but everything was so straightforward (following the instructions Paul posted) that there would really be no benefit.

Previously, I had always dropped the pan first, THEN pumped the ATX dry after replacing the pan and filter and filling the pan w/ cheap MERCON (since it would be pumped back out anyway). This process was OK, but a bit wasteful, as nearly 18 quarts of fluid were required when all was said and done.

This time, I pumped the ATX until the fluid wouldn't flow any more, then I used a 1/4" hose down the dipstick tube and a vacuum pump to remove about a gallon of ATF from the pan. I then followed the rest of the procedure in the original post of this thread, and I was able to do a full flush using less than 14 quarts and I barely spilled a single drop of ATF.

Just for kicks, I pulled the old filter apart. It was amazingly clean! The pan magnet had the usual amount of sludge on it, but I was still amazed at how good the fluid & the filter looked. The fluid was dark red, but still translucent and it smelled fine. This goes to show you that proper cooling (aux cooler) and synthetic fluids DO help quite a bit!
 

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Mike, it was my first time and i assumed that the amount people had talked about on here would be sufficient. I was wrong. Also, i understand that the fluid has to heat up to get a proper reading, so i thought i shoudl go drive it before i checked it. I never intended on driving it like that with such a low fluid level. I know now though :)
 

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Originally posted by SHOZ123@Jun 6 2005, 11:18 AM
I have my radiator cooler bypassed but it is only because I replaced the radiator and did not want to deal with the hassle of ever messing with those hoses again.
I'm in a similar situation, but it's because the body shop didn't want to go through the hassle of reconnecting all the lines. So, instead of using the stock cooler they stuck a small hayden cooler in the bottom driver's side area in front of the condensor. I'm thinking about buying another cooler, but I don't know where to mount it. I don't know if I should run two small coolers, or if I should just try to stuff the biggest cooler I can find in there.
 

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Originally posted by sfontain+Jun 6 2005, 10:29 AM--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (sfontain @ Jun 6 2005, 10:29 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-godspunk32@Jun 6 2005, 09:51 AM
Correct.  The heat from the engine coolant helps the transmission fluid get to its optimal operating temperature faster, and the use of the cooler keeps the fluid from getting too hot, as the stock cooler will not do.

JR
How long do you think it takes for the ATF to get to operating temperature?

I'm just surprised by the theory because hot coolant doesn't flow through the radiator to heat the ATF until the coolant itself is hot and the thermostat opens, by which time the ATF is already quite toasty from friction and radiant engine heat. [/b][/quote]
The ATF will usually take about 20 minutes of driving to reach optimal temps, according to what I've seen around here and what I know about the operation of a transmission. The engine reaches full temp much faster.

JR
 

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mikehawk, the best place for a cooler is mounted horizontally on the splash shield. Check the measurements and find the biggest one that will fit. It probably won't be that big, but two small coolers should suffice under most conditions. Your small Hayden might just fit there. Cut away the splash shield material w/ a razor knife for optimum breathing. Then get another cooler to mount to the condenser. I'm currently doing fine with the radiator cooler bypassed, just running the stock aux cooler and a B&M 19K cooler in front of the condenser. The bypass thermostat keeps the B&M out of the loop until 185*F, and so far it has been very rare that temps exceed 195*F. However, since I do frequently do a lot of stop and go traffic, I will probably install another very small cooler in the splash shield just in case I get stuck in traffic for an hour in 100* weather w/ a car full of luggage and the A/C on MAX. :)

JR, the ATX will not heat up any faster due to the radiator. You can see this by idling your car for an hour. The ATX will still not be up to normal temps, even though the coolant has been warm and right next to the ATX cooler the whole time. However, driving your car in traffic for 10 minutes will have it up to temp, regardless of whether you are using the stock radiator ATX cooler or not.
 

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here is a link to the Magnefine filter I purchased.... click me

I used a 1/2" hose version to prevent any bottle necking of the fluid. The transmission hoses are 3/8" so an adapter was needed... which I purchased from McMaster Carr. This setup was recommended by SHOZ123.... and has worked great.

mikehawk - the Mobil 1 fluid cost me about $85 for 15 quarts. I purchased the fluid and performed the labor myself. The transmission filter cost about $25-30... so all total I spent around $110.
 

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One addition to this maintenance. There is no reason to pump the tranny dry and then fill with 10 qts. You can:

1)Pump out 2 qts, fill 2 qts and repeat

or

2)Disconnect the other line, put a 3/8" hose on it, and dip it in the new fluid. This will allow the tranny to suck in new fluid while the old is being remove.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Originally posted by 1993MercSable@Jun 26 2005, 10:40 AM
One addition to this maintenance. There is no reason to pump the tranny dry and then fill with 10 qts. You can:

1)Pump out 2 qts, fill 2 qts and repeat

or

2)Disconnect the other line, put a 3/8" hose on it, and dip it in the new fluid. This will allow the tranny to suck in new fluid while the old is being remove.
This is assuming you are not changing the filter.
 

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Did anyone hear of Wynn's transmission flush service?
The Ford dealer in my area (metro-Detroit) offers it at the dealership for $99.
The filter is not changed only flushed.
Is there a problem if the pan isn't dropped or the filter changed?
Looking to do it on my 98 tech with 50k miles that has never had tranny service.
 
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