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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
PSA for those of whom are endeavoring the dreaded internal water pump on the 3.5 v6 on 2010+ taurus and others of the platform with the same engine. Fear not, you don't need to pull the engine. Consider this your motivation.

Tools needed. Harmonic balancer puller, cam lock out tool, breaker bar, E torx socket set, and regular torx socket set up to at least T55, 1/4 socket set with extensions, 3/8 set with extensions, and 1/2 set with extensions. At minimum a 4 pound hammer. Having some spare 2x4 or 4x4 laying around helps. Wrench sets of course. Make sure you have 1 ¹/¹⁶ wrench . Torque wrenches, one for inch pounds and one for foot pounds, Screw drivers, prybars, pliers, and spark plug sockets if you so choose and any other extras you have will help, IE electric impact, air impact etc etc.

First things first, jack the front up. Put on stands. Make sure they are out of the way and secure. Put wood on jack and slightly press up on the oil pan. Very little pressure. Remove battery clamps. Take off intake tube at both ends. Remove strut tower brace if installed. Remove intake manifold, just top half. Couple hoses here and there. NOTE, there's one bolt hidden in the back right below the manifold for a bracket, stuff rags in the holes of bottom half of intake. Remember to pry gently to not damage anything when you do pry on stuff. Do not disconnect fuel lines. They may stay intact to save hassle. Remove coils and then remove valve covers and anything associated. Remove all connectors for top of engine and push harness to the right of engine bay. Pull spark plugs if you plan to change then stuff rags into spark plug holes. Remove belt and tensioner. Remove motor mount from engine and from body. Drain coolant from petcock. You'll have to remove some hoses and such as you find they are in the way. Remove pass front tire, remove wheel liner. Screw ford's plastic screw clips. The bolts for the liner are 3, 5.5mm and 1, 8mm I believe. Once that's out unscrew harmonic balancer bolt, use puller and Remove but be CAREFUL not to damage the harmonic balancer like I did it's a 70$ mistake that no part stores carry usually. Have a pan ready underneath. May need to lower engine a little bit. Here comes the fun part, remove the motor mount studs with the E torx socket or a 1/4 inch 6 point if you're feeling risky. remove all 26 bolts on the timing cover, 8mm 10mm and 15mm bolts. One 15 directly in the middle that you'll need to lower the engine to remove completely. Make sure they're all out and use card board to remember exactly where they go. There's different lengths. Once you are positive gently pry on the pry point back and forth to rock the cover off the guide pins. You'll have to pull it out weird. Kinda turn it so the bottom comes up. Takes some fidgeting. Don't get frustrated with it. Very fragile. Very expensive. Once they bad boy is out clean er up, scrape the RTV off without scraping the cover up. Pop out your seal and replace it now if you wish. Now put crank bolt back in and find yourself TDC. Number one piston is pass rear piston. Make sure timing marks line up. Both top dots at 12 o clock (respective to angle of cylinder head) and bottom mark on oil pump at 5 o clock. Lock in your cam locks in. Please watch and understand the videos I link. They are professionals and can explain it way better. We're all just here to help each other and save some money. Once you get it where it needs to be, you can either follow their way and leave them cam phasers and turn the cams to remove the chain or if you are replacing the phasers remove them with the T55. They are very tight. Don't be scared. Make sure cam locks do not pop out when loosening phasers. Hold the cams with the 1 ¹/¹⁶ wrench to help. Remove the guides and tensioners and chains. Top 2 tensioners just pop out if you pull up on them. You'll need to remove the phaser sensors up top. They can only go back in the way they came out so don't Fret if you forget which went where. Now is the time you follow the video exactly as they do it. Google if necessary for you. Quadruple check that you got the timing right and torque them bolts to spec on everything. Obviously replace the water pump while the chain and timing is apart also clean the RTV while its apart too. Once it's all installed and ready to go. put the black RTV exactly where it was on the engine. 4 bolts in the middle have RTV on them. Do not RTV the cover. Make sure your tensioners are popped and theres no slack in the chain. Youll have to push down on the 2 top ones to engage them once its all set. Put your bolts back in and hand tighten. Let sit one hour and then torque to spec. Then reassemble engine as you took it apart fellas and fellets. Double check everything as you go and torque everything that has a torque spec. And there you go. Congrats you just did your own waterpump without removing the engine. Side note, don't run car for 24 hours. Drain oil before starting. Keep old filter on and pour in 6 quarts of cheap oil. Fill up the coolant. For the first time you'll wanna pull the fuel pump relay and let crank for a few seconds. Stop a few seconds. Crank a few seconds. Listen to how it cranks. It also builds oil pressure for the tensioners to pump up. If all is good put relay back and fire up. Check everything. Let it warm up. Drive about 10 miles or so. Drain oil and filter and replace with new filter and good oil. Make sure you reset the engine oil life meter 😀

Links
Ford OE assembly specs

Cloyes timing video

Parts
Black RTV
1 cheap oil change
1 good oil change
3 gallons of orange GM coolant
Rubbing alcohol for cleaning timing cover

Then here is my parts list from rock auto
Be prepared to make some parts store trips for stuff I forgot 😂 i absolutely highly recommended you get everything I bought because you're already in there. Might aswell just git er done.
Font Rectangle Parallel Number Screenshot
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Why the Orange GM coolant vs Motorcraft?
IMO it's just all around better coolant. It is very much compatible. It comes in a concentrate. Parts stores actively carry. I personally don't trust stuff that says Motorcraft due to my water pump failing at 77k miles. Trust issues 😬 ford has changed what coolant to use in the past couple years because of the water pumps. The Original coolant wasn't sufficient for the WP so I use what I know works.
 

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IMO it's just all around better coolant. It is very much compatible. It comes in a concentrate. Parts stores actively carry. I personally don't trust stuff that says Motorcraft due to my water pump failing at 77k miles. Trust issues 😬 ford has changed what coolant to use in the past couple years because of the water pumps. The Original coolant wasn't sufficient for the WP so I use what I know works.
Ford changed their coolant recommendation now to the YELLOW not Gold coolant. It's new, & completely back serviceable to all Cyclone V6s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ford changed their coolant recommendation now to the YELLOW not Gold coolant. It's new, & completely back serviceable to all Cyclone V6s.
Like I said, it's all personal preference what you trust. I just know I've had the best luck running gm dexcool in my ford's. My Taurus had pink coolant in it when I got it for some reason. My step dads 2012 escape has been running dexcool since new and is still going strong at 105k and my grandma's 2014 explorer is going strong at 180k with dexcool. But like I said run what you feel is what's best for you. All that really matter is after you change the water pump, keep up on the flushes. The point of this post was just to help people understand that they can do their own waterpump pretty easily!
 

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Like I said, it's all personal preference what you trust. I just know I've had the best luck running gm dexcool in my ford's. My Taurus had pink coolant in it when I got it for some reason. My step dads 2012 escape has been running dexcool since new and is still going strong at 105k and my grandma's 2014 explorer is going strong at 180k with dexcool. But like I said run what you feel is what's best for you. All that really matter is after you change the water pump, keep up on the flushes. The point of this post was just to help people understand that they can do their own waterpump pretty easily!
Pink coolant is the result of someone adding distilled water to the Orange stuff to top it off. You do realize that Motorcraft Orange and Dexcool have almost identical formulations though, right? To the point where they're compatible with each other. So there's no magic trick here by using Dexcool over a Motorcraft coolant, it's not "better". In fact the latest Motorcraft Yellow is ALSO compatible with the Orange, because it's actually a better chemical formulation with a longer service life. Hard to believe they would release something inferior that has a longer service spec.
 

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The one thing I dont like about my car, this achilles’ heel water pump.
Had a coolant loss the other day showing on my degass. Then I saw the coolant crust around the cap. Whew, another 9 dollars and coolant loss averted. Dreading the weep hole check

I change my coolant every third oil change. Run a cooler thermostat hoping it keeps the pump happy and seals cook a little slower.
If you told me any voodoo to make the pump last id do it.
After reading your instructions and doing one at the shop on a explorer I am feeling not so scared of it.
But I have been mulling the idea of a dummy pully water pump plate then route it externally thru a custom timing cover and use an electric coolant pump.
just mulling. And thinking of ordering a pump to get measurements.
 

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I'll stick with MAKULOCO, a Ford Dealer mechanic for years. He's on YT , & has several "how To's" , for Fords there. He recommends all those who own Cyclone V6 vehicles, with internal coolant pumps, to now use the new Yellow coolant. That's good enough for me.
The Dexcool doesn't have phosphates in it, now Ford seems to want a formulation of coolant with phosphates.
 

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The one thing I dont like about my car, this achilles’ heel water pump.
Had a coolant loss the other day showing on my degass. Then I saw the coolant crust around the cap. Whew, another 9 dollars and coolant loss averted. Dreading the weep hole check

I change my coolant every third oil change. Run a cooler thermostat hoping it keeps the pump happy and seals cook a little slower.
If you told me any voodoo to make the pump last id do it.
After reading your instructions and doing one at the shop on a explorer I am feeling not so scared of it.
But I have been mulling the idea of a dummy pully water pump plate then route it externally thru a custom timing cover and use an electric coolant pump.
just mulling. And thinking of ordering a pump to get measurements.
I plan to do the same thing if/when my pump fails. I've already started working up a design in CAD. The design is very tricky because in front of the pump there is the pulley you mentioned (for the timing chain), and behind the pump there is a coolant jacket that flows back through the center of the engine block (from the front of the engine to the back). It's not a traditional design of coolant flowing into one side of the pump and out of the other side. Coolant also feeds into the pump from the engine block behind the pump. Then there's the issue of how to route coolant through the timing cover with the timing chains and tensioners being all around the pump and being in the way. You can't make any hard turns/bends in the routing of coolant flow because (1) it will restrict flow and (2) those hard turns/bends will quickly collect "gunk" and restrict flow even more. I think I'm getting close to a solution, though. Once I solve a few technical hurdles, I'll probably buy a trashed engine on which to experiment from a wrecking yard and then post my CAD files.
 
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