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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If the insulation is damaged and copper strands are exposed, how do you fix it? Walmart sells brush-on vinyl insulation paint. I plan to spray clean the wires with brake parts cleaner or choke cleaner, and put multiple layers of the black vinyl stuff. Has anyone tried it?

I know the best way would be to cut off the wire/plug, and put a new plug with pigtail. But it's a lot of work. I wonder if anyone knows an in-situ repair method.
 

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If the insulation is damaged and copper strands are exposed, how do you fix it? Walmart sells brush-on vinyl insulation paint. I plan to spray clean the wires with brake parts cleaner or choke cleaner, and put multiple layers of the black vinyl stuff. Has anyone tried it?

I know the best way would be to cut off the wire/plug, and put a new plug with pigtail. But it's a lot of work. I wonder if anyone knows an in-situ repair method.
3M Super 33 electrical tape. Stretch it as you put it on so there are no voids.
 

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I agree, splice in new wire and seal with heat shrink tubing. Wrapping with vinyl tape is often not 100% leak proof, especially if the insulation already failed once. Heat shrink is much better, and if the area is in danger of rubbing against something, get some split corrugated wire loom and put the wires inside it.
 

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Loudsho92 and KahnTyranitar: Years ago I would never have suggested electrical tape. I found that it always peeled off and never sealed. Then I was introduced to Super 33+. It actually works. It's what the pro's use. If you want a quick reliable fix, this is the stuff. (No, I don't work for 3M).
 

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Cake monster
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It's not as hard as you think to splice new wire, I would go to a junkyard and cut out a good section and heat shrink the ends together, soldering is even a good idea. It shouldn't take more than an hour to splice in a new wire harness. As for restoring the old wires, perhaps you could go and get some spray on rubber coating for under your car and try to separate the wires so you can cover them with it, that might work but that's a half baked idea :D
 

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Loudsho92 and KahnTyranitar: Years ago I would never have suggested electrical tape. I found that it always peeled off and never sealed. Then I was introduced to Super 33+. It actually works. It's what the pro's use. If you want a quick reliable fix, this is the stuff. (No, I don't work for 3M).

Reviews all over the web do seem very favorable for that Super 33+ tape. It makes since that good tape costs money, as i found out gorilla tape is pretty good compared to regular duct tape for many things.
 

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For automotive use, electrical tape will work just fine.

Just make sure you get a good brand, and stretch it tight, and it will last for the rest of the time you own your vehicle.
 

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It's not as hard as you think to splice new wire, I would go to a junkyard and cut out a good section and heat shrink the ends together, soldering is even a good idea. It shouldn't take more than an hour to splice in a new wire harness. As for restoring the old wires, perhaps you could go and get some spray on rubber coating for under your car and try to separate the wires so you can cover them with it, that might work but that's a half baked idea :D
??????

Heat shrink tubing should be used to insulate a connection AFTER it has been soldered.......
 

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Loudsho92 and KahnTyranitar: Years ago I would never have suggested electrical tape. I found that it always peeled off and never sealed. Then I was introduced to Super 33+. It actually works. It's what the pro's use. If you want a quick reliable fix, this is the stuff. (No, I don't work for 3M).
We use it all the time as the top (finish) layer on all kinds of insulation repair jobs, including 14,000 volt lines. Super 33+ has a dielectric rating good for up to 600 volts AC. The reason for doing insulation/jacket repair is that an uncut (unspliced) conductor just needing some insulation repair is always a better option than a splice. Every point there is a splice in any wired system is one more potential failure point, no matter how well that splice is executed. The paint-on vinyl system has to be clearly labeled and UL Listed as an electrical insulation repair compound or it should not be used for that purpose. We use a 3M product called "ScotchKote" , but I'm pretty sure you can't buy it at WalMart.



Thanks for letting me chime in as someone other than a Taurus owner for a change!

Dan Hasenauer - Master Electrician
Hewitt-Young Electric LLC
IBEW LU86
Rochester, NY

(A self funded, non taxpayer supported, private sector, Skilled Trades Union)

Some of my termination splices. Each wire is bigger than your thumb, the connectors (lugs) are over 8" long.
(a 2000 amp, 480v, 3 ph. main connection):
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks. The wire is 20 gage. It's too frail to use vinyl tape. I already cut the wires off with the intent of replacing them. Wrong. I have to replace the plug as well. I have to 1) buy a new plug with pigtail 2) go to junk yard or 3) brush on the insulation paste. Surprisingly, individual copper strands are healthy under the black and red surface tarnish. I will look for scotchkote.
 

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That paintable electrical tape is fine. I use it. Get about 4 coats on there and your good to go. It's just a black version of plastidip. I have the sprayable stuff too.
 

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Thanks. The wire is 20 gage. It's too frail to use vinyl tape. I already cut the wires off with the intent of replacing them. Wrong. I have to replace the plug as well. I have to 1) buy a new plug with pigtail 2) go to junk yard or 3) brush on the insulation paste. Surprisingly, individual copper strands are healthy under the black and red surface tarnish. I will look for scotchkote.
What is this wire doing? Without knowing that, I would say Option 1 would be your best, cost effective (not cheapest) solution then. Use an insulated crimp connector (butt splice) with a crimp tool for NON-insulated crimps to make up your splice (the other kind always fails sooner or later) and then finish up with Super 33+, stretching and pulling it tight as you go, taping past the ends of the splice. The size splice connector you need will be red or pink or any shade in between. A can of Scotchkote costs $28 last time I checked.
 

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Cake monster
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??????

Heat shrink tubing should be used to insulate a connection AFTER it has been soldered.......
Well, thanks for noting that. You don't have to solder when heat shrinking, it's a good idea though. So suggesting that you should use heat shrinking and possibly consider soldering the connections as well isn't that incorrect of a statement, as you could also be lazy and twist them instead.

Sorry if I wrote that backwards, but I don't think anyone is stupid enough to actually do it backwards anyway. But I can correct my post if ya like. :D
 

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Cake monster
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We use it all the time as the top (finish) layer on all kinds of insulation repair jobs, including 14,000 volt lines. Super 33+ has a dielectric rating good for up to 600 volts AC. The reason for doing insulation/jacket repair is that an uncut (unspliced) conductor just needing some insulation repair is always a better option than a splice. Every point there is a splice in any wired system is one more potential failure point, no matter how well that splice is executed. The paint-on vinyl system has to be clearly labeled and UL Listed as an electrical insulation repair compound or it should not be used for that purpose. We use a 3M product called "ScotchKote" , but I'm pretty sure you can't buy it at WalMart.



Thanks for letting me chime in as someone other than a Taurus owner for a change!

Dan Hasenauer - Master Electrician
Hewitt-Young Electric LLC
IBEW LU86
Rochester, NY

(A self funded, non taxpayer supported, private sector, Skilled Trades Union)

Some of my termination splices. Each wire is bigger than your thumb, the connectors (lugs) are over 8" long.
(a 2000 amp, 480v, 3 ph. main connection):
That stuff looks pretty awesome.
 

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We use it all the time as the top (finish) layer on all kinds of insulation repair jobs, including 14,000 volt lines. Super 33+ has a dielectric rating good for up to 600 volts AC. The reason for doing insulation/jacket repair is that an uncut (unspliced) conductor just needing some insulation repair is always a better option than a splice. Every point there is a splice in any wired system is one more potential failure point, no matter how well that splice is executed. The paint-on vinyl system has to be clearly labeled and UL Listed as an electrical insulation repair compound or it should not be used for that purpose. We use a 3M product called "ScotchKote" , but I'm pretty sure you can't buy it at WalMart.



Thanks for letting me chime in as someone other than a Taurus owner for a change!

Dan Hasenauer - Master Electrician
Hewitt-Young Electric LLC
IBEW LU86
Rochester, NY

(A self funded, non taxpayer supported, private sector, Skilled Trades Union)

Some of my termination splices. Each wire is bigger than your thumb, the connectors (lugs) are over 8" long.
(a 2000 amp, 480v, 3 ph. main connection):
Nice work! Why so many individual conductors per phase?
 

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That stuff looks pretty awesome.
Nice work! Why so many individual conductors per phase?

Thanks! The conductor count is to get to 2000 amp (not watt) continuous running capacity, with NEC mandated headroom capacity over that. This type of installation is referred to as parallel conductors, S.O.P. in the industry. This install is fed by twelve 4" conduits (largest standard conduit size) that are underground, with the other end being 700' away. Each pipe is pulled in with a rope and winch set-up that pulls at up to 10,000 ft/lbs. constant force, this shite is heavy lbs. per foot! The lugs are crimped on with a hydraulic crimper that exerts 15,000 PSI, literally forming the conductor and lug into a single piece of metal. A single conductor that size is just not practical, let alone available, it would be the diameter of a schoolyard flag pole!

Edit: I got my start installing car audio at the age of 17. (as a hobby)
 

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Thanks! The conductor count is to get to 2000 amp (not watt) continuous running capacity, with NEC mandated headroom capacity over that. This type of installation is referred to as parallel conductors, S.O.P. in the industry. This install is fed by twelve 4" conduits (largest standard conduit size) that are underground, with the other end being 700' away. Each pipe is pulled in with a rope and winch set-up that pulls at up to 10,000 ft/lbs. constant force, this shite is heavy lbs. per foot! The lugs are crimped on with a hydraulic crimper that exerts 15,000 PSI, literally forming the conductor and lug into a single piece of metal. A single conductor that size is just not practical, let alone available, it would be the diameter of a schoolyard flag pole!

Edit: I got my start installing car audio at the age of 17. (as a hobby)
Got ya. I was really wondering why not use fewer larger conductors, but you answered it-700 Ft run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Being a non-electrical person, what impresses me is not the size of the conductors or their numbers but the cleanliness of the enclosure.
 

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It needs to be that clean or you can get arcing, which could lead to catastrophe with that much power available.
 
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