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Discussion Starter #1
2004 Vulcan 180K
Trying to remove EGR valve to replace O-ring seal due to vacuum leak.
Can't get the large nut at the bottom of the EGR valve off.
Have soaked it with Kroil
Heated the bottom of the valve with a propane torch.
Can't budge it with locking multi-grips.
They are not slipping.
10" leverage just not enough to break it loose.
No room to put a longer pipe wrench on it.


How do the pros remove this nut?
Thanks, all help appreciated, John
 

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You'll need to heat it up good, and by that =you may need something more then a propane torch. I'm assuming you're using the same kind of torch a plumber uses? Anyhew I lucked out when I did my coolant pipes and mine broke free pretty nicely. But if it's rusted you will need to heat the nut up till it's pretty well red and then try to free it then.
 

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Man let me know how this goes for you as I started trying to remove mine back in October and finally gave up as I was scared of breaking the pipe or stripping the nut. Was told you have to use a Flare nut wrench but finding one big enough plus the leverage to do some good . The only other thing I know you can do for more leverage is remove the hood . Good luck and please keep updating this post... hell take a pic . Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #5
OK, here's a little more detail.
1. Soak the bottom of the EGR valve where the connection to the exhaust tube is with penetrating oil. I use Kroil others probably work, for as long as possible, overnight if possible.
2. I tried heat. Not sure if it had much effect.
3. The 18" pipe wrench did the trick, see photo. I didn't think it would fit but as you can see it does.
Remove the EGR valve with the support bracket. If you need to take the valve off the bracket, do it on the bench.
The support bracket is held on with a couple of stainless bolts with extensions, you have to use a deep socket or box wrench. There is also an additional support that bolts to the engine block, easy to get off.
I only had to change the O-ring. Don't forget to clean the inside of the cavity in the plastic intake manifold where the EGR (and new O-ring) fits.
The stainless bolt behind the EGR is hard to get in as you can't see it. Install the front one (closest to you) loosely first and this will help locate the back one. You may be able to do this easier from underneath but I managed OK from the top.
I put Never Seize on the threads where the big nut attaches (you can see it in the picture) no need to tighten with the 18" pipe wrench!


Unfortunately I have more than one vacuum leak and haven't got to the other one yet. Hope this helps, John


PS, thanks for the "likes"
PPS, sorry about the rant last night, I tried to post this twice and was unable to get any response from the webpage and lost my post.
It's a great forum but I think they have too much going on when it is busy. I have a fast, optical fiber connection and this is the only forum I have problems with. Tried sending a note to forum admin some time back but no reply.
 

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1997 Ford Taurus 3.0L Wagon 226,362 miles
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Just recently broke that nut free on my '97 - first time ever, as I have owned the car since new and only *I* have ever done any work on it.

Didn't have the proper sized box wrench, so out of desperation AND my better judgement, went with my largest adjustable wrench, which did the trick! I *did* spray it down the night before with PBBlaster and Liquid Wrench, too. Turns out it is a very substantial nut, so using the adjustable really isn't that bad - as long as you snug it up really good.

I put the wrench on from the driver's side and I believe I was pulling the handle inward toward the engine, which allowed me to put all my weight into it (which is below average for my 5'11.5" frame, BTW). Had to kneel atop the engine, which didn't feel too good on my knees...
 

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Ok I am a little jealous of all these success stories. I guess I will make this one of my next 3 day projects as I will try to mix up a solution of acetone and transmission fluid and squirt that bolt down.
 

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It was all I could do to get mine to break loose. 1-1/16th inch wrench is the one you need, also I sprayed it down and let it sit for a while before I tried a second time. I thought I was going to twist the tubing trying to get it loose, but it finally popped.
 

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1997 Ford Taurus 3.0L Wagon 226,362 miles
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It was all I could do to get mine to break loose. 1-1/16th inch wrench is the one you need, also I sprayed it down and let it sit for a while before I tried a second time. I thought I was going to twist the tubing trying to get it loose, but it finally popped.
Same here. Might've been two tries for me, too. And I had the same feeling about the tubing getting twisted, but then ! C-R-A-C-K !, it was loose! Seemed like a miracle to me because I had just failed in removing the Y-pipe exhaust manifold nuts on the firewall side - even though I had successfully removed them just a couple of years back (also for the very first time) while changing the front cover and oil pan gaskets. Ended up slipping a "naked" hack saw blade between the flanges and S-L-O-W-L-Y cutting into them until they sheared off under pressure. Took about an hour!

I figured after the exhaust manifold nuts wouldn't budge, there was *no way* that EGR nut was going to come off, but thankfully - I was wrong (again).
 

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Same here. Might've been two tries for me, too. And I had the same feeling about the tubing getting twisted, but then ! C-R-A-C-K !, it was loose! Seemed like a miracle to me because I had just failed in removing the Y-pipe exhaust manifold nuts on the firewall side - even though I had successfully removed them just a couple of years back (also for the very first time) while changing the front cover and oil pan gaskets. Ended up slipping a "naked" hack saw blade between the flanges and S-L-O-W-L-Y cutting into them until they sheared off under pressure. Took about an hour!

I figured after the exhaust manifold nuts wouldn't budge, there was *no way* that EGR nut was going to come off, but thankfully - I was wrong (again).
When you put things back that are exposed to exhaust heat, consider using anti-seize. On my DOHC,s they have nuts and bolts to hold gaskets. They are a bit cranky the first time off but very easy after doing the dope. I also coat new gaskets and they reuse quite well.
-chart-
 

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I think he means anything that is threaded and gets really hot. When I took my upper intake off this past weekend, I used some RVT around all the o-ring fittings that go into the UIM. EGR tube going into the UIM,(not on the threaded nut, used anti-seize on that part), PCV tube, and the Intake Manifold Runner Control motor. I wanted to make sure I didn't have any air leaks in those areas. I took my UIM off to change the valve cover gaskets, so I was doing this as more of a preventative measure. I think after running the car, that I did have have some small vacuum leaks. The idle seems a little smoother, and the cold startup is smoother and quicker than before. Bonus :)
 

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1997 Ford Taurus 3.0L Wagon 226,362 miles
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04 Freebee:

Not sure I'd want to do that. O-rings should fit tightly enough to do the job. Or buy new ones if not.
 

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I would have replaced the o rings, but I couldn't get any new ones over the memorial day weekend, and I needed to get it back together, so I used Orange RVT and let it cure for over 24 hours. That should hold all those areas for as long as I need the car.
You are correct though, replacing the o rings is the right way to go.
 

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I suggest that once you have it apart, when you put it back together again, coat the threads with anti-seize so this will not happen again if you need to repeat the process some day...
 

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I put the wrench on from the driver's side and I believe I was pulling the handle inward toward the engine, which allowed me to put all my weight into it (which is below average for my 5'11.5" frame, BTW). Had to kneel atop the engine, which didn't feel too good on my knees...
Hi fellas,

You turned the wrench toward the engine? So clockwise? I'm having a heck of a time with this bolt, and what a shame if I were tightening it. I assumed "lefty loosey" ?

Thx
 

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Hi fellas,

You turned the wrench toward the engine? So clockwise? I'm having a heck of a time with this bolt, and what a shame if I were tightening it. I assumed "lefty loosey" ?

Thx

I'm actually looking on here specifically for an answer to this lol. One person said they were pushing it towards the engine block, so I'm assuming (if you're doing this from the driver's side facing the engine) you would want to go clockwise. I'm still looking to be sure though, because just like you I really don't want to be tightening this pain in the ass bolt. Good luck!
 

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I'm actually looking on here specifically for an answer to this lol. One person said they were pushing it towards the engine block, so I'm assuming (if you're doing this from the driver's side facing the engine) you would want to go clockwise. I'm still looking to be sure though, because just like you I really don't want to be tightening this pain in the ass bolt. Good luck!

It is a normal threaded compression nut but facing up. Turning it to the brake booster will tighten it if the wrench is pointing to the driver side wheel.


The issue is getting the wrench in there and having any room to turn it. I use a large adjustable wrench since it is the largest I have and use a little heat also. I could see custom bending a cheap wrench to get more turning room.
 

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It is a normal threaded compression nut but facing up. Turning it to the brake booster will tighten it if the wrench is pointing to the driver side wheel.


The issue is getting the wrench in there and having any room to turn it. I use a large adjustable wrench since it is the largest I have and use a little heat also. I could see custom bending a cheap wrench to get more turning room.
Thank you for clarifying regarding it being upside down! Aside from heat, is there a recommended rust penetrant I can use? I've seen recommendations for PB Blaster, Kroil, etc. but I'm looking for the cheapest but most effective. WD-40 is a no-go lol.
 
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