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what horsepower difference is there between a vulcan 3.0 and 3.3L GM? cause i just bought a 92 grand am and it has BALLS!!!
 

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The vulcan in the taurus is like 180 or 185 HP IIRC. Don't know about the GM. You did add .3 ltrs though, so you should at bare minimum have a 10% increase in power over the vulcan, or 203.5 HP, and that assumes the 3.3 GM is a pushrod like the Vulcan. The Duratec is a 3.0 ltr w/ 200 HP factory, so a 3.3 GM DOHC engine should be making around 220 HP. I know it doesn't really work this way, but mathmatically speaking, that's what it should be assuming a static ratio between displacement and HP.

-Dan
 
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The only 6 cyl GM engines I know of are the 3.1, 3.4 & 3.8 - so I have no idea what this 3.3 is. How long does it's power last? The 3.1 & 3.4, from what I've heard, have nice low end but are dogs up high. The 3.1 is right around 150 HP IIRC. The 3.4 is 180 HP, and the 3.8 is 300 HP (non supercharged) - right on par w/ the Duratec. The Supercharged 3.8 is 240 HP. That all came from Chevy's website, not that I enjoyed looking at it <_<
. Anyways, good luck with your car.
 

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I think the vulcan hp rating varies between the generations. First and second gens have about 140 or 145, and third and fourth gens have around 150 or 155. Also, I think the grand ams have more agressive gearing in first and second gear and that may be what you're feeling.

Don't your owners manuals have the horsepower ratings in them?
 
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yeah, gen 3 vulcans are 145, gen 4's are 155. Now that you mention it, I have heard that about Grand Am gearing.
 

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Originally posted by jason8225@Feb 26 2004, 08:28 AM
The only 6 cyl GM engines I know of are the 3.1, 3.4 & 3.8 - so I have no idea what this 3.3 is. How long does it's power last? The 3.1 & 3.4, from what I've heard, have nice low end but are dogs up high. The 3.1 is right around 150 HP IIRC. The 3.4 is 180 HP, and the 3.8 is 300 HP (non supercharged) - right on par w/ the Duratec. The Supercharged 3.8 is 240 HP. That all came from Chevy's website, not that I enjoyed looking at it <_<
. Anyways, good luck with your car.
3.8 is 200HP. I know that's what you meant but just clarifying. A buddy of mine has a 2000 GrandPrix GT with the 3.8L. We raced a few times and I can beat him. But I would never beat a GTP. If you ever drove one you would know exactly what I'm talking about! Psycho!!!
 

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doesn't dodge have a 3.3L thats roughly on par powerwise with the vulcan?
 

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Originally posted by dant98@Feb 26 2004, 09:23 AM
and that assumes the 3.3 GM is a pushrod like the Vulcan.
ok, now this may be a stupid question, but it is one that ihave wondered for quite some time... i always hear an engine called a "push-rod" engine, and i have always assumed it to mean the actual push rods that the cam shaft pushes on... if this is true, then why specify it as a push-rod engine?? just seems kind of redundant to me, since they all have push rods...

i dunno though, maybe some one can clear this up for me.
 

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I was looking around on Carpoint's website. Acording to them, the grand prix only had two available engines in '92, both were 2.3L I-4's, one had 120 Hp, the other 180 Hp (I'm assuming turbo'ed or something). They also say that a v6 wasn't available until '97...I'm not sure if this information is correct tho. I had a friend in high school with a '95 Grand Am GT that I thought had a 3.1 v6 IIRC. Can anyone verify or deny this info from another source?
 

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Originally posted by hoss+Feb 26 2004, 09:50 AM-->QUOTE (hoss @ Feb 26 2004, 09:50 AM)
<!--QuoteBegin-dant98
@Feb 26 2004, 09:23 AM
and that assumes the 3.3 GM is a pushrod like the Vulcan.
ok, now this may be a stupid question, but it is one that ihave wondered for quite some time... i always hear an engine called a "push-rod" engine, and i have always assumed it to mean the actual push rods that the cam shaft pushes on... if this is true, then why specify it as a push-rod engine?? just seems kind of redundant to me, since they all have push rods...

i dunno though, maybe some one can clear this up for me. [/b]
Umm...AFAIK there aren't any pushrods in an OHC motor.
 
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Originally posted by OAKLEY2000SEL+Feb 26 2004, 09:19 AM-->QUOTE (OAKLEY2000SEL @ Feb 26 2004, 09:19 AM)
<!--QuoteBegin-jason8225
@Feb 26 2004, 08:28 AM
The only 6 cyl GM engines I know of are the 3.1, 3.4 & 3.8 - so I have no idea what this 3.3 is.  How long does it's power last?  The 3.1 & 3.4, from what I've heard, have nice low end but are dogs up high.  The 3.1 is right around 150 HP IIRC.  The 3.4 is 180 HP, and the 3.8 is 300 HP (non supercharged) - right on par w/ the Duratec.  The Supercharged 3.8 is 240 HP.  That all came from Chevy's website, not that I enjoyed looking at it  <_< 
.  Anyways, good luck with your car. 
3.8 is 200HP. I know that's what you meant but just clarifying. [/b]
oops, thanks.
You know I would never intentionally give GM more credit than deserved, lol.
 

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Originally posted by jason8225+Feb 26 2004, 10:03 AM-->QUOTE (jason8225 @ Feb 26 2004, 10:03 AM)
Originally posted by [email protected] 26 2004, 09:19 AM
<!--QuoteBegin-jason8225
@Feb 26 2004, 08:28 AM
The only 6 cyl GM engines I know of are the 3.1, 3.4 & 3.8 - so I have no idea what this 3.3 is.  How long does it's power last?  The 3.1 & 3.4, from what I've heard, have nice low end but are dogs up high.  The 3.1 is right around 150 HP IIRC.  The 3.4 is 180 HP, and the 3.8 is 300 HP (non supercharged) - right on par w/ the Duratec.  The Supercharged 3.8 is 240 HP.  That all came from Chevy's website, not that I enjoyed looking at it  <_< 
.  Anyways, good luck with your car. 

3.8 is 200HP. I know that's what you meant but just clarifying.
oops, thanks.
You know I would never intentionally give GM more credit than deserved, lol.
[/b]
lol! That's damn true!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well i just found out that the 3.3L GM engine is a BUICK engine(3300) and it is a push-rod like the vulcan. It produces 160-165HP at 4800 RPM and roughly 185-190lb of torque at 3500 rpm. But like i said ..the grand am [email protected]$#in FLIES
I can chirp the tires in second gear.
 

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Given the HP rating, I'd probably chaulk it up to gearing to some extent. You should race a Duratec powered Tarii in that and see how well you do. Maybe you'll beat him off the line, but above 60 MPH I would say it's gonna be the 'tech all the way. If there's any water on the ground at all, with my new chip I can loose traction in first and burn all the way through first and part of second. On dry ground, the stock serpintine belt is slipping on the 1-2 shift. I'm going to have to replace it with a gatorback before the belt goes bad.

-Dan
 

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Originally posted by mikehawk+Feb 26 2004, 11:01 AM-->QUOTE (mikehawk @ Feb 26 2004, 11:01 AM)
Originally posted by [email protected] 26 2004, 09:50 AM
<!--QuoteBegin-dant98
@Feb 26 2004, 09:23 AM
and that assumes the 3.3 GM is a pushrod like the Vulcan.

ok, now this may be a stupid question, but it is one that ihave wondered for quite some time... i always hear an engine called a "push-rod" engine, and i have always assumed it to mean the actual push rods that the cam shaft pushes on... if this is true, then why specify it as a push-rod engine?? just seems kind of redundant to me, since they all have push rods...

i dunno though, maybe some one can clear this up for me.
Umm...AFAIK there aren't any pushrods in an OHC motor. [/b]
the camshaft has to push something in order to open the valves...
 

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Originally posted by hoss+Feb 26 2004, 12:46 PM-->QUOTE (hoss @ Feb 26 2004, 12:46 PM)
Originally posted by [email protected] 26 2004, 11:01 AM
Originally posted by [email protected] 26 2004, 09:50 AM
<!--QuoteBegin-dant98
@Feb 26 2004, 09:23 AM
and that assumes the 3.3 GM is a pushrod like the Vulcan.

ok, now this may be a stupid question, but it is one that ihave wondered for quite some time... i always hear an engine called a "push-rod" engine, and i have always assumed it to mean the actual push rods that the cam shaft pushes on... if this is true, then why specify it as a push-rod engine?? just seems kind of redundant to me, since they all have push rods...

i dunno though, maybe some one can clear this up for me.

Umm...AFAIK there aren't any pushrods in an OHC motor.
the camshaft has to push something in order to open the valves... [/b]
I thought it was pushing the valve stem, or maybe a rocker arm.
 

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Originally posted by dant98@Feb 26 2004, 12:40 PM
Given the HP rating, I'd probably chaulk it up to gearing to some extent. You should race a Duratec powered Tarii in that and see how well you do. Maybe you'll beat him off the line, but above 60 MPH I would say it's gonna be the 'tech all the way. If there's any water on the ground at all, with my new chip I can loose traction in first and burn all the way through first and part of second. On dry ground, the stock serpintine belt is slipping on the 1-2 shift. I'm going to have to replace it with a gatorback before the belt goes bad.

-Dan
I replaced mine with a gatorback and it still slipped in the 1-2 shift. You need to get a gatorback that is slightly shorter than stock so the spring loaded tensioner gets stuffed back and applies more force.

I forced one on that was 1.2" shorter than stock and it stopped the belt squeal until I installed the VAK. Now I just have too much tech powah again. (We should get a little muscle-man smiley to flex or something. That would be cool after all the tech powah and vulcan powah statements).
 

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I used to have an 89 Olds Cutlass Ciera XC with a 3.3. The advertised HP was 170 in the owners manual. It had good power, but the tranny wasn't right for the power range, maybe if it had like 12 inch tires you could better utilize the power.
Anyway the engine is undistructable, never had a problem in the 180K I put on it.
 

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Originally posted by mikehawk+Feb 26 2004, 11:51 AM-->QUOTE (mikehawk @ Feb 26 2004, 11:51 AM)
Originally posted by [email protected] 26 2004, 12:46 PM
Originally posted by [email protected] 26 2004, 11:01 AM
Originally posted by [email protected] 26 2004, 09:50 AM
<!--QuoteBegin-dant98
@Feb 26 2004, 09:23 AM
and that assumes the 3.3 GM is a pushrod like the Vulcan.

ok, now this may be a stupid question, but it is one that ihave wondered for quite some time... i always hear an engine called a "push-rod" engine, and i have always assumed it to mean the actual push rods that the cam shaft pushes on... if this is true, then why specify it as a push-rod engine?? just seems kind of redundant to me, since they all have push rods...

i dunno though, maybe some one can clear this up for me.

Umm...AFAIK there aren't any pushrods in an OHC motor.

the camshaft has to push something in order to open the valves...
I thought it was pushing the valve stem, or maybe a rocker arm. [/b]
in OHC, the cam is on top of the head and directly pushes the valve spring. no rockers or lifters or pushrods. In an OHV engine, the cam is just on top of the block (just underneath the LIM), and has lifters, pushrods, and rocker arms.
 

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MECHANICS 101

There are currently two (2) types of designs for modern four cycle internal combustions engines:

1. OHV - This stands for "Overhead Valve", meaning the intake and exhaust valves are located in the cylinder head(s) and above the cylinder(s) and combustion chamber(s). The valves are operated by a camshaft that is located in the "V" portion of the cylinder block, between the intake manifold and the crankshaft. This makes for a long distance between the camshaft and the valves. The camshaft is connected to the valves by a lifter, (either solid or hydraulic) then a pushrod and finally a rocker arm. (Thus the term "pushrod" engine.) As the camshaft revovles the high portion(s) or lobe(s) of the camshaft come into contact with the lifter(s) pushing upwards, which then moves the pushrod(s) up, which in turn pivots the rocker arm(s) into contact with the valve stem(s) causing the appropriate valve(s) to open.

2. OHC - This stands for "Overhead Cam", meaning the camshaft(s) are located in the cylindr head(s), not in the cylinder block. (NOTE: OHC engine designs are also OHV designs because the valves are located in the head as in an OHV. However, OHC engine designs are never termed OHV.) In an OHC design the pushrod(s) is/are eliminated because the camshaft(s) set(s) directly above the valve(s) in the head. Usually there is no lifter(s) in an OHC design, though, I think I recall an OHC design in the past with lifters, but cannot recal the manufacturer. The OHC design, by eliminating the complicated OHV valve actuating method, has the advantage of being able to rev up to a higher RPM power producing limit, than an OHVV design, through weight savings, friction reduction and the ability to reduce valve float. There is less strain placed on the valve train. As a result, the OHC design is usually a smoother operating engine. They are more expensive to manufacture mainly due to the additional casting required in the cylinder heads to hold the camshaft(s), multi-camshafts and the drivetrain to operate the camshaft(s). OHC engines are made SOHC (Single Overhead CAM) and DOHC (Dual Overhead Cam) designs.

Prior to the invention and popularization of the OHV and OHC engine designs there was the flathead or "L" head design. This had the valves mounted in the cylinder block, setting upside down off to one side of the cylinder. The camshaft was in the block directly below the valve stems. This was a very inefficient and power restrictive design.

NOTE: A camshaft NEVER comes into direct contact with the valve stem in any engine design. There will always be an adjusting shim, adjustor mechanism, a rocker arm or a cap between the lobe of the camshaft and the valve stem. So, while a camshaft pushes against the valves, it does so indirectly, though the OHC design is as close to direct contact to the valve as is possible.

Pushrods are of two (2) designs. The first is a one piece hollow tube and the second is a three (3) piece hollow tube. In the first design the pushrod is simply a mechanical connection between the lifter and the rocker arm. The valves are adjusted by a screw and locking nut located in the rocker arm or if hydraulic llifters are incorporated, the valves are adjusted automatically by the lifter. In the second design, the pushrod is not only the mechanical connection between lifter and rocker arm, but also the mechanical adjusting mechanism for the valves. This design incorporates a hollow pushrod that is female threaded to accept a short threaded shaft that has a locking nut on it. The valves are adjusted by loosening the locking nut and turning the the short shaft that is threaded into the top of the pushrod. NOTE: Some manufacturers, like Ford, use diferent length pushrods to adjust the valves.

A bit long winded, but I hope this helps you to better understand the differences between an in engine designs.

JD
 
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