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You probably broke a vacuum line and have a massive leak. My car did something similar after I did my head gasket because I forgot the EVAP vac line. Any time you do work and something happens that wasn't there before, triple check everything.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
You probably broke a vacuum line and have a massive leak. My car did something similar after I did my head gasket because I forgot the EVAP vac line. Any time you do work and something happens that wasn't there before, triple check everything.
Where is the EVAP LINE
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Someone please tell me, on my 2003 Taurus ses with the 3.0 Vulcan engine how to correctly set the what I call the CPS. If you’re standing at the front of the car, just to the right side of the engine about the one o’clock position is the little round thing that runs off the camshaft of the engine. And of course it has got a connector hooked to it, someone had loosened set screw , and I set it back at 38 degrees from center line of the engine. Is this correct

Thanks for all the help.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I didn’t someone else was what you (helping me)!!!!! How do you reset it.
 

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Please double check your plug boots are connected properly to the spark plug terminal, easy to miss one or two, feel that CLICK.
 

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If you are absolutely sure the engine ran fine and the problems occurred AFTER the CPS was rotated, you might simply rotate it back to where it was and that is not at 38 degrees, but at 38 - 24 = 14 degrees. This is because the Cam Synchronizer shaft was not properly installed and is off by one tooth. From several pictures online you can conclude that the "wormwheel" on the shaft has 15 teeth. That is 24 degrees per tooth. Rotating the sensor 24 degrees counter-clockwise (so at 38 + 24 = 62 degrees) is probably not possible because it will hit the lower intake manifold, so that cannot be the position where the engine ran fine.

Ultimately it is the position of the sensor relative to the tab on the synchronizer shaft that determines the timing. IF the synchronizer is properly installed THEN the correct position of the sensor is at 38 degrees. But if the shaft is off by one tooth, the sensor should be off by 24 degrees.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
If you are absolutely sure the engine ran fine and the problems occurred AFTER the CPS was rotated, you might simply rotate it back to where it was and that is not at 38 degrees, but at 38 - 24 = 14 degrees. This is because the Cam Synchronizer shaft was not properly installed and is off by one tooth. From several pictures online you can conclude that the "wormwheel" on the shaft has 15 teeth. That is 24 degrees per tooth. Rotating the sensor 24 degrees counter-clockwise (so at 38 + 24 = 62 degrees) is probably not possible because it will hit the lower intake manifold, so that cannot be the position where the engine ran fine.

Ultimately it is the position of the sensor relative to the tab on the synchronizer shaft that determines the timing. IF the synchronizer is properly installed THEN the correct position of the sensor is at 38 degrees. But if the shaft is off by one tooth, the sensor should be off by 24 degrees.
Thanks for all the information, is it possible to get the right spot by moving it back and forth while the engine is running.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Thanks for all the information, is it possible to get the right spot by moving it back and forth while the engine is running.
I got the running good found the pvc hose off but still don’t have timing right
Thanks for all the information, is it possible to get the right spot by moving it back and forth while the engine is running.
so would be my best bet to get it dialed in.
 

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Thanks for all the information, is it possible to get the right spot by moving it back and forth while the engine is running.
Probably not. The PCM might get confused by a timing that is supposed to be static.

Having said that, I cannot imagine the timing is overly critical. I assume the PCM uses the CPS only to determine in which phase each cylinder is, so it knows which injector and which coil to activate. The actual timing of the spark plug and injector will probably be derived from the (much more accurate and non-adjustable) Crankshaft Position Sensor (CKP).
 

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Injector timing is managed by the camshaft position sensor (cmp) which mounts/sits atop the camshaft synchronizer.
 

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Not according to this


description which confirms my assumption that the CMP signal only determines the correct sequence for the injectors, not the time they open, which is determined by the "engine system clock" CKP.

The point I wanted to make was that if the CPS is a few degrees off, this probably has little or no effect on the running of the engine because the CMP signal cannot be used for critical timing anyway. Why would you use one very wide CMP signal (that might also be a bit off) per total engine cycle when you have 70 sharp pulses of a non-adjustable CKP sensor at your disposal. That just makes no sense.
 
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