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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Like the title says, I just finished changing my pads, shoes, rotors and drums. When I took my car for a (very, very slow) test drive I discovered I needed to press the pedal to the floor to make it stop, even then it felt weak.

I did have an issue with the rear drivers side drum and fluid got out. Does my issue sound like air in the lines? There are no leaks, I spent an hour checking.

If it does sound like air, what's the procedure for purging the lines? I know it requires two people and that's all.

Thanks guys!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
ok, so a little research showed to bleed the lines you get someone in the front seat to press the pedal while the valve at the caliper is open, as fluid comes out you tighten the valve up.

I had someone help me with the back two brakes just now. When I opened the valve on the drivers side rear drum I heard "shhhhh" lol

Stopping is MUCH MUCH better now. Feels almost normal. Almost.

I can't seem to lock up the brakes. I got up to 70, slammed on the brakes (I had a hunch) and I slowed VERY fast, but no anti-lock lockup. Ideas? I didn't bleed the front but I lost no fluid in the front. Aren't they separate systems anyways? The front wheels and the back?
 

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You should bleed all four wheels. I was taught many years ago that this is the order you do it in....1)right rear 2)left rear 3)right front 4) left front. If you are unaware, right is the passenger side, left is the driver side.
 

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I've seen the order given in diagonal patterns with r/r --> l/f then l/r-->r/f. The lines are hooked up that way. Be sure to top off your master cylinder under the hood with approved brake fluid before and after you are done bleeding the lines.
 

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I would bleed all four corners which has the added bonus of essentially flushing the system with new fluid. When you install new brake pads on drum brakes it does take a little while for them to get settled in and adjusted.
 

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Its a split diagonal system. LF & RR. RF & LR. Make sure helper pumps and holds brake pedal while you open and close the bleeder. Do this until the fluid runs clear, no air bubbles. Keep the master cylinder topped off during the bleed procedure, dont allow it run empty.
 

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Also make sure the rear shoes are adjusted correctly.
 

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If the self adjusters are working, you should do forward and reverse a few times and slam on the brakes each times. The rocking motion causes the adjuster to tighten up the shoes with the drums.
 

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Braking firmly in reverse makes the self adjuster do it's thing. Do it going forward does not.

The initial adjustment should be done by hand with the rear wheel(s) jacked up off the ground. The backing up adjusting is to keep the shoes adjusted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've followed all your advice, bled the brakes in a criss cross fashion and performed some braking maneuvers to adjust the shoes.

Breaking feels firm again and the parking brake is tight as ever. Thanks guys! It's nice to not have a terrible grinding noise anymore and a nice smooth slowdown.
 
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