Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Car is a '93 Taurus wagon, 3.0 Vulcan, AXOD...

Lately the thing has begun bucking and missing and stuttering under load. Happens at pretty much any speed, if you try to accelerate from a steady speed, it misses and stutters. Once at a steady speed (any speeed) it runs fine. Odd thing is, it still gets good mileage.

It has been about 50K since the plugs, cap, rotor, PCV, etc., were changed. Air filter is fresh.

No, it's not the torque converter... tranny and t/c were rebuilt just recently.

Any ideas?

Also, what would be a good but inexpensive code reader for this car?

Thanks,
Tom in Indiana
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,116 Posts
You dont need to buy a code reader. You just connect the STI (self test input) pin of the EEC TEST connector to SIGNAL RETURN at the connector, and the CEL will flash out the codes.

First thing I would do is a complete tune up (plugs, wires, etc), since it has been 50K sines all these were replaced.

When was the last time the fuel filter was replaced? A fuel pressure check while driving under heavy load conditions would be a good idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
EEC self test procedure

You can check at the above link for instructions and a diagram to read the codes on your 93.

93 should be three digit codes, which are found Here

I agree with Jeff, you should perform a tune up first since it's been 50k. This sounds like an ignition related issue to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,446 Posts
I agree, my first thought on the miss under load, was excessive plug gap.

If you decide to replace the plugs, OEM single platinum plugs might be something to consider, as the spark gap is less prone to erosion over time.

I also like to set my new plugs to minimum specified gap, as the gap is always getting larger with time, so setting it to the narrow side of spec, means the spark gap will remain in spec longer.

Now that it's winter, that narrower gap will make for a hotter spark & easier cold starts.

If you decide to replace the wires, consider OEM Motorcraft, they are well made & a good value for the buck imo.

Just some more thoughts for pondering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all the tips, yes, I will read the codes and do a complete tune-up.

I've never change a fuel filter before, what is the procedure for releasing the fuel pressure?
Where does one get the little tool for removing the filter? Does it come with the new filter?

Thanks,
Tom in Indiana
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
One other question... looking at Advance Auto Parts online, they list about 26 different plugs for the Vulcan.
Is there really much difference between Bosch and NGK and Autolite, etc? I generally don't use Champion anymore, but is an Autolite Platinum as good as the standard Bosch or NGK platinum?

Tom in Indiana
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
To depressurize the fuel system, remove the fuse for the fuel pump, start the car (or attempt to). When it stalls the fuel pressure is relieved.

The plastic clips that hold the fuel filter in will sometimes break, but the new filter should have new clips. I usually use a common flat blade screwdriver to get the old clips out. The new ones will install by hand.

On the plugs, many people here (myself included) have had trouble with Bosch plugs. Some have not, but they are a rarity. Stick with either Motorcraft single platinums, or Autolite single platinums and you'll be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,446 Posts
Autolite makes Motorcraft plugs & are said to perform well in Ford engines, so I'd consider staying with these two, as they are designed for our engines.

Ford engines seem to be kinda persnickety about plug type & design, as others have reported various peformace problems with other types of plugs, especially the multi ground electrode models.

all that said, I've used single platinum electrode Bosch plugs in my 94 3.8L for about 10 years with good results & practicaly no wear, (the spark gap was still in spec) & the plugs were clean, electrodes & ceramic insulators undamged & the threads & plated body were free of rust, when i changed them out this year.

I changed them out for OEM Motorcraft single platinum plugs & new Motorcraft wires & they are doing well so far.

I also use nickel antisieze compound on the plugs threads & torque the plugs to the low side of spec.
I also use silicone di-electric grease in both ends of the plug wires, to prevent flash over on wet humid days & prevent the plug boots from baking on & sticking to the plugs ceramic insulators.

On the fuel filter, my 94 didn't require a tool to release the fuel filters line connecton. just be carful & not damage the metal clips, as they are reuseable. Some filters come with new ones, but if the old ones are in good undamaged condition, they can be reused.

To safely release fuel pressure, you can disable the fuel pump & crank the engine until it ceases trying to start.

You can disable the pump several ways, by unpluging the in trunk fuel pump inertia switch, or just bump it hard enough with a piece of wood, until it trips, or pull the fuel pump power relay, or it's fuse, so the pump won't run.

I then also like to loosen the gas cap while I'm working on the filter, so the tank won't build pressure as it warms. Seeing as how your in cold country, that might not be a problem this time of year!!!! lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
OBDI Ford engines (Taurus Gen.I and Gen.II) are not that picky about what plugs you stick in them (not like OBDII engines which prefer OEM Motorcrafts).

I always used Bosch platinums (single), and only changed them when I started feeling guilty 50-60K miles. By then, the center electrode was fairly worn, but they were still firing fine.

I would not worry about depressurizing the fuel system, just shut the engine off, wait a couple of minutes and go ahead and change it.

The breakerless ignition module in the distributor starting going bad on my Vulcan engine right around 105K miles. The major symptom was sudden engine shutoff after the engine warmed up (could feel the engine going soft before the engine died). The least expensive cure was replacement with a lifetime warranty rebuilt A1 Cardone (about $55). The first rebuilt I got was had a defective mechanical advance mechanism, so make sure you make the receipt for warranty proof or purchase.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,433 Posts
Car is a '93 Taurus wagon, 3.0 Vulcan, AXOD...

Lately the thing has begun bucking and missing and stuttering under load. Happens at pretty much any speed, if you try to accelerate from a steady speed, it misses and stutters. Once at a steady speed (any speeed) it runs fine. Odd thing is, it still gets good mileage.

It has been about 50K since the plugs, cap, rotor, PCV, etc., were changed. Air filter is fresh.

No, it's not the torque converter... tranny and t/c were rebuilt just recently.

Any ideas?

Also, what would be a good but inexpensive code reader for this car?

Thanks,
Tom in Indiana
[/b]
I have a brand new Actron that has been sitting for 4 years in it's package.

I bought it for my 94 vulcan and my kid wrecked it before I had a chance to open it and use it.

You can have it for 22.00 shipped via USPS

If you seriously need it I wll get up and go look at the model number.

Mike
B)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Well, I've changed the plugs (Autolite platinum AP 764), wires (Autolite Professional series), Cap and rotor, PCV valve and air filter. Haven't yet changed the fuel filter, and haven't yet road tested the car (it's a little on the icy side here today.)

I plan to do the fuel filter as soon as the garage floor dries out, and I intend to run some Sea Foam thru the system.

On the '93 Vulcan, there is a black plastic tube that runs from the oil filler neck to the air intake hose. Would that be a good place to inject the Sea Foam? Is there enough suction there to suck it from the can, or will I need to pour it in?

Thanks for all the help. I'll let y'all know the results of the road test as soon as the ice melts.

Tom in Indiana
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,116 Posts
That hose wont work well, if at all..... that is the fresh air line that replaces the crankcase air, blowby, etc sucked out by the PCV system to be burned in the engine. Locate the vacuum tree on the firewall, trace a vacuum line that runs to the intake AFTER the throttle body, and use that line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
That hose wont work well, if at all..... that is the fresh air line that replaces the crankcase air, blowby, etc sucked out by the PCV system to be burned in the engine. Locate the vacuum tree on the firewall, trace a vacuum line that runs to the intake AFTER the throttle body, and use that line.
[/b]

Thanks, Jeff, I'll do that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Finally got to road test the '93. Runnin' GREAT! I never would have believed a car running that bad only needed a tune-up... and I haven't changed the fuel filter or done the Sea Foam yet.

What ever was bad is in the trash can now.

Thanks y'all for chiming in, I appreciate it.
Tom in Indiana
[/quote]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,446 Posts
Good to hear it's running better, it'll likely appreciate the tune up later on, when those really cold days show up.

On the Seafoam treatment, if you decide to ingest it via a intake side vacuum line, do so slowly, so as not to let it suddenly suck in a large dose & stall the engine from hydrolock & bend something up!!!!

To do it slowly, use a piece of tubing with a metal sports needle attached & dip the needle end into the can of Seafoam, so the engine ingests it slowly.
Doing it this way may dirty up the new plugs & will likely leave a good bit in the engine oil, so you'll want to change the oil & filter afterward.
Better still, add the Seafoam to the gas tank & it'll clean things up, although more slowly, but won't diry up the new plugs nor load up the crank case lube so bad.

Better still add a can of Chevron "Techron Concentrate Plus", at the specified oz/gal ratio, to a tank of Chevron, Texaco, or Cal Tex gas, at the station, then fully fill the tank & drive the vehicle on the road with some spirtied sessions above 3500 rpm thrown in & run most of the treated tank out, before refilling. That'll tidy things up inside, without dirtying up the oil or the new plugs.

Just some more thoughts for pondering.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top