Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Going to remove water pump bolts. Thought about freezing them with loctite freeze (-43 degrees) to try to ensure that I don't brake any bolts off while in the process. Could this affect the aluminum.

Have you tried this process???
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,537 Posts
Never heard of it until now, but I guess if you can heat bolts to loosen them you can also go the other direction. Try it and see. Just remember aluminum has a thermal expansion coefficient that's almost twice that of steel and it conducts heat (and cold) well so it might make certain things tighter. I don't know if -45ºF is really cold enough to do much. The bolt will probably warm up about 20-30 degrees by the time you get the wrench on it. You probably need liquid nitrogen at -321ºF to really make a big difference but I would worry about cracking things.

I guess if the freeze spray doesn't work try the penetrating oils next.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
Looks promising. Another tool to try. I read up on it and it supposedly causes fine cracks in the rust or corrosion that allow the penetrating fluid thats all ready in the product to seep in and go to work. I will give it a try next time I have the problem. Thanks for posting about it, haven't heard of it before.

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,561 Posts
Looks promising. Another tool to try. I read up on it and it supposedly causes fine cracks in the rust or corrosion that allow the penetrating fluid thats all ready in the product to seep in and go to work. I will give it a try next time I have the problem. Thanks for posting about it, haven't heard of it before.

Ed
Good analysis.

Good test would be on a pinch bolt on strut. That is where rust binds in the clearance hole.

-chart-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The reasons i'm willing to try it because, i can't get to all the bolts that surround the water pump with heat but i can use the needle straw on the end of an aersol can as it manipulates to the heads of the bolts.

Just wish I knew someone who actually used it.

Thanks for the responses
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
I guess you will be the first one here :)
It makes sense to cool the bolt and "shrink" it that way. Crack the rust too probably. But don't put too much or it might crack the surroundings.

Hmmm, I have some places that I can test it on my vehicles. Maybe...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
MMA in a shop we had CO2 fire extinguishers and used them to freeze stuff then heat it to break loose stuborn bolts. At home I have put stuff in the freezer w/ PB Blaster soaked cotton then move it to the sun to get the PB to work on stuff rusted together. Sealed the PB stuff or else it would smell up the freezer. Of course, this was on small stuff that could be done this way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,377 Posts
I think I am going to have to add this to my tool box. I do not know if this would help prevent breaking the bolt though. I seem to snap more bolts in the winter time when i am working on cars. that might just be my luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
Well, in the winter all of the components are tighter.
The trick of this freezing process is to cool just the inside piece (the bolt), to make it "shrink" and loosen it that way. Heating the assambly tryes to heat the outside part surrounding the bolt.
I guess it all depends of what is safer to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
using clay you can make a collar for just the bolt head, and pour liquid nitrogen into it, sounds like it make work. The drawback would be that its hard to get Liq. N, and the heat energy would flow out of the metal surrounding the bolt also. It would be great on certain applications, where a majority of the bolt is eposed, however I don't think it would be worth while for a bolt thats recessed all the way.

A good cool/heat cycle should fracture any rust bonds, just rember that there is a point where the steel will become brittle, and break easier under strain.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top