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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Just wanted to update everyone on the progress. The car is still cranking for a while in the morning before it starts. I hit a little snag though. I noticed one of the vacuum hoses - the big one that runs behind the engine - was old and starting to crack. It just generally looked really bad. First off, it is in a horrible position, where it can get hot and wear out quickly, but that is another story. I went up to Oreilly's and bought a new length of hose. While trying to replace the old hose, I snapped off one of the vacuum ports from the vapor canister. I learned from this that the car runs REALLY bad when that hose is disconnected, lol. I also learned that it is a really crappy job trying to get to that freaking canister and then disconnecting the "quick-connect" hoses. So, I got out a bottle of Gorilla Glue, and it is at least holding together for now. Anyway, I went ahead and ordered another canister ($40 from rockauto.com), since I have no idea how long the glue will hold. I am also planning on buying a new fuel pump (the whole assembly) and replacing that. So, by the end of the month I will have a new vapor canister, a new fuel pump, and new main vacuum line connecting the vapor canister and the intake. Hopefully, this will be the end of it and I can stop spending more time under the hood than in the driver's seat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Just a quick update. I am going to keep updating this until I figure this thing out. I got the new vacuum canister today and replaced the broken one that I had superglued. It is at least getting better mileage, and I feel a little safer. With the new hose and the vacuum canister sealed up, it seems to start a lot better. It started acting a little better even with the old one still on there - it was just air tight because of the glue. I'm really not sure what the purpose of the part is - its the 'vapor purge solenoid'. I was thinking that maybe it gets charged with vapor when the car runs. Maybe if it was old, or cracked, or leaking this would affect the starting? I'm not sure. I know that the port that I broke off snapped off really easily, so maybe it was already starting to go. Like I said, it is up on the firewall behind the engine, so the plastic and rubber gets really hot. I'll report with updated symptoms when I see how the new canister and hose react.
 

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Just a quick update. I am going to keep updating this until I figure this thing out. I got the new vacuum canister today and replaced the broken one that I had superglued. It is at least getting better mileage, and I feel a little safer. With the new hose and the vacuum canister sealed up, it seems to start a lot better. It started acting a little better even with the old one still on there - it was just air tight because of the glue. I'm really not sure what the purpose of the part is - its the 'vapor purge solenoid'. I was thinking that maybe it gets charged with vapor when the car runs. Maybe if it was old, or cracked, or leaking this would affect the starting? I'm not sure. I know that the port that I broke off snapped off really easily, so maybe it was already starting to go. Like I said, it is up on the firewall behind the engine, so the plastic and rubber gets really hot. I'll report with updated symptoms when I see how the new canister and hose react.
The purpose of all Evaporative (EVAP) Emissions Systems is to prevent the release of VOC. The main concern is Hydrocarbons (HC’s) or unburned gasoline vapors. Hydrocarbons are released from gasoline in the form of a vapor, and if the fuel system is not air tight, these vapors can then escape into the atmosphere. The problem with unburned hydrocarbons is that they aid in the production of photochemical smog.


Automotive Evaporative Emissions Systems
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Sweet - thx for the info. When I broke that thing, it severly affected the drivability. So, I know that it is an important part of the vacuum system. Sorry about the dula thread thing. For updates on the hard morning starts thing, check here:

http://www.taurusclub.com/forum/87-...hanging-fuel-pump-05-3-0-a-8.html#post1610820

I am now thinking that this has something to do with the emissions systems. My manual says that for the first 20-120 seconds after the car starts, it tries to heat the cats. There are several systems that could be helping it do that. in the end, it is controlled by the PCM. In some cars there is a secondary air system as well, complete with a relay and a pump. If my car has one, I have not found it yet. Stay tuned.
 

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Ok, so I bought a 2005 Taurus 2 years ago, and so far, I have loved it. There have been a few things here and there, but nothing major. I have been surfing this forum, and I wanted to post a fix for something that came up recently. About 6-8 months ago, I noticed that the engine took an unusually long time to crank after it had been sitting a while - especially in the morning. I did all of the normal stuff - replaced plugs and wires, changed the oil, checked the battery (with a voltmeter), installed a new fuel filter, new air filter, and replaced the idle air control valve. Nothing worked.

Finally I jumped on here and read a bunch of posts about the same symptoms. Everyone seemed to be convinced that it was the fuel pump. The thing about my particular issue is that I was not getting low pressure. The pump kicked right on and there was never any other issues except when i went to start it after a long time of sitting. Weird, right?

OK, so I'm going to take a little detour before I explain what I finally did that seems to have completely cured my car. Before I owned the Taurus, I had a 1990 T-Bird SC. It was a beast. I remember on that car that I had to completely depress the brake pedal to start the car. About a year ago, I put new brakes on my Taurus, and I did it by myself with a rigged up one man bleeder kit (not the best way, I know). So, about the time that this starting thing started happening is when I did the brakes. Over the past 6 months or so, besides the starting thing, I noticed that there seemed to be some air left in the brake lines. So, the other night me and a friend re-bled the brakes the correct way, with him checking for air.

I know that all logical mechanical/car knowledge says that one thing has nothing to do with the other. So, what I am about to say might seem crazy to some people, and I would not be surprised if some on this forum call me nuts, BUT the car had still not been driven or started for at least 4 hours. Normally, this would have caused a slow start. But, when I put those wheels back on and started it, it cranked right over. It has been fine for 2 mornings in a row, and every other time since then that I start it after its been sitting. It does exactly what it is supposed to do - no racing engine, no hard cranking, nothing weird at all.

Here's the thing - I can't find any documentation or anything anywhere that says that the ABS system on that model taurus has anything to do with the PCM or starting the car. I have worked on my own cars for years - way before the era of the PCM. I have also had that T-bird, which obviously had to have functioning brakes to start the car. The reason I am posting this is two-fold. First, if you happen to have had your pads replaced and now your car is starting hard in the A.M., you might consider bleeding your system again. Secondly, I was wondering if anyone knew FOR SURE if the ABS controls or sensors down there have anything to do with the PCM or engine control.

Thanks in advance and for all the good help so far,

Josh

Just change my rear brake on my 2006 Taurus four weeks ago. The abs sensor broke.
Abs Light activate on dash.
I was not planning to replace it..
1 week now since that car crank ok, but takes long to start.
I will get a new abs sensor and see if it correct the issue.
 

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I can guarantee you that replacing the ABS sensor will have zero effect on how the car starts or runs.

Long crank before engine starts after sitting for a day or so is likely the anti backflow in the fuel pump failing or the pump itself failing. Either of these issues will require replacing the fuel pump.
 
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