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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I plan to buy two torque wrenches to help me do the car repair jobs down the road. The first one I am looking for is 1/2" Drive CDI Torque 2503MFRMH with 30' - 250' Lbs. Based on my understanding, the torque wrench is precise in the middle of the range. So I need one for doing the jobs such as valve cover gasket, water pump etc. It seems that 3/8" drive is good for this kind of jobs. But I am not sure which scale range I should buy for the 3/8" drive.

any comment is appreciated.
Thank you
 

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^ Fwiw, you can get all 3 sizes for ~$30 ($9.99/ea.) at Harbor Freight Tools on sale with a coupon. Good enough for the diy'er.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I recommend getting a 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2". The 10-100ftlb is a good range.
Found the following torque wrenches are much cheaper than CDI.

-----------------------------------------------------------
TEKTON 24320 1/4-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench, 20-200-Inch/Pound
1.67-16.7 Foot/Pound
-----------------------------------------------------------
TEKTON 24325 3/8-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench, 120-960-Inch/Pound
10-80 Foot/Pound
-----------------------------------------------------------
TEKTON 24335 1/2-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench, 10-150-Foot/Pound
-----------------------------------------------------------
TEKTON 24340 1/2-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench, 25-250-Foot/Pound
-----------------------------------------------------------

Torque Specification for UIM/LIM is 15/18 foot-lb
Torque Specification for Valve Cover Gasket is 9 foot-lb

So I need to buy TEKTON 24320 1/4-Inch and TEKTON 24325 3/8-Inch in order to get the job done.

Thank you
 

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^+1 on sheila's idea about the Harbor Freight torque wrenches being ok for we occasional shade tree wrench turners.

If you opt for a breakover type torque wrench, as opposed to the beam type, be sure to relieve/back off the breakover torque setting when storing, so its internal spring doesn't take a set over time & corrupt its calibration.
Also Don't use the break over torque wrench as a breaker bar, to loosen stuck fastners, like lug nuts, or spark plugs.

I'd also suggest checking its calibration/break over torque setting, Before each use.

I recently caught my 1/4" drive HF break over wrench Not breaking over when torquing my Briggs V Twin spark plugs to spec. It had performed for years, doing spark plugs, tranny pan fastners, ect, no problem, BUT, for some reason this one time it just stopped working that day & that was the day I Didn't check that puppy before use!!!! It would break over on loosening, but not tightening!!!!

Yah because I was paying attention I caught it in time, so I didn't over tighten & streatch, or strip the aluminum head plug threads out.

I'm careful when I use these break over wrenches, not to over travel when they break over, so as not to damage the break over mechanism & store the wrenches unset & clean, in their origional box & containes, with the reciepts inside, so HF replaced the 1/4 drive wrench, which still looked brand new after 7 years, no questions asked!!!!

I have a beam type 1/2 inch drive 0-100 ft/lbs Craftsman, whos calibration is traceable & I rig it with adapter fittings, to double check the break over torque settings on all 3 of my 1/4 - 3/8 - 1/2 inch drive break over torque wrenches Before I use them!!!!

The torque ranges of the HF 1/4 - 3/8 - 1/2 inch drive will cover most of the fastners we'll likely run into on our cars & light trucks. Some of the large driveline fastners may require a 3/4 drive higher torque range, but I've gotten by with the old 0-100 ft/lb Craftsman for years, before opting for the 3 HF ratcheting break over wrenches, which I prefer to use, as I don't have to watch a torque scale when using & torquing tranny pan fastners, that & the ratchet function makes it a joy to use in tight spaces!!!!

More thoughts for pondering, let us know what you opt for.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
^+1 on sheila's idea about the Harbor Freight torque wrenches being ok for we occasional shade tree wrench turners.

If you opt for a breakover type torque wrench, as opposed to the beam type, be sure to relieve/back off the breakover torque setting when storing, so its internal spring doesn't take a set over time & corrupt its calibration.
Also Don't use the break over torque wrench as a breaker bar, to loosen stuck fastners, like lug nuts, or spark plugs.

I'd also suggest checking its calibration/break over torque setting, Before each use.

I recently caught my 1/4" drive HF break over wrench Not breaking over when torquing my Briggs V Twin spark plugs to spec. It had performed for years, doing spark plugs, tranny pan fastners, ect, no problem, BUT, for some reason this one time it just stopped working that day & that was the day I Didn't check that puppy before use!!!! It would break over on loosening, but not tightening!!!!

Yah because I was paying attention I caught it in time, so I didn't over tighten & streatch, or strip the aluminum head plug threads out.

I'm careful when I use these break over wrenches, not to over travel when they break over, so as not to damage the break over mechanism & store the wrenches unset & clean, in their origional box & containes, with the reciepts inside, so HF replaced the 1/4 drive wrench, which still looked brand new after 7 years, no questions asked!!!!

I have a beam type 1/2 inch drive 0-100 ft/lbs Craftsman, whos calibration is traceable & I rig it with adapter fittings, to double check the break over torque settings on all 3 of my 1/4 - 3/8 - 1/2 inch drive break over torque wrenches Before I use them!!!!

The torque ranges of the HF 1/4 - 3/8 - 1/2 inch drive will cover most of the fastners we'll likely run into on our cars & light trucks. Some of the large driveline fastners may require a 3/4 drive higher torque range, but I've gotten by with the old 0-100 ft/lb Craftsman for years, before opting for the 3 HF ratcheting break over wrenches, which I prefer to use, as I don't have to watch a torque scale when using & torquing tranny pan fastners, that & the ratchet function makes it a joy to use in tight spaces!!!!

More thoughts for pondering, let us know what you opt for.
Thank you for all these great information. I will buy TEKTON torque wrench which has great rating on amazon and come with lifetime warranty. The only issue for me is that I don't know when the wrench will go bad. So I have to be very careful since I don't have tool to test those wrenches.

If I remember correctly, HF only honors 90 warranty for torque wrenches.

Thank you
 

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^ Fwiw, you can get all 3 sizes for ~$30 ($9.99/ea.) at Harbor Freight Tools on sale with a coupon. Good enough for the diy'er.
When a tool means the difference between a sheared bolt and a good install I would rather have the good quality tool.

Cheap China tools for when accuracy is needed is not the way to go.

Found the following torque wrenches are much cheaper than CDI.

-----------------------------------------------------------
TEKTON 24320 1/4-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench, 20-200-Inch/Pound
1.67-16.7 Foot/Pound
-----------------------------------------------------------
TEKTON 24325 3/8-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench, 120-960-Inch/Pound
10-80 Foot/Pound
-----------------------------------------------------------
TEKTON 24335 1/2-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench, 10-150-Foot/Pound
-----------------------------------------------------------
TEKTON 24340 1/2-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench, 25-250-Foot/Pound
-----------------------------------------------------------

Torque Specification for UIM/LIM is 15/18 foot-lb
Torque Specification for Valve Cover Gasket is 9 foot-lb

So I need to buy TEKTON 24320 1/4-Inch and TEKTON 24325 3/8-Inch in order to get the job done.

Thank you
I would stick to the CDI tools. They are made with the same quality and parts (this is coming from a former Snap-On employee) as Snap-On but for a quarter of the price. Yes they cost more but they are a higher quality and made in the USA.

The TEKTON look to be on par with Harbor Freight and similiar construction.
 

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As I mentioned, Harbor freight in the past few months replaced my 7 year old 1/4 drive torque wrench, no questions asked, but I had my origional reciept, the packing box & plastic wrench container/box, all clean & obviously in like new condition, so all that likely makes a difference.

If you have a vice, you could set the wrench break over torque, then grip the wrench square drive in the vice, apply torque to get the feel & see if its at least breaking over as set, Before you use it.

Yes you can't double check the torque calibration setting, But at least that way you'd preclude twisting off a bolt, or stretching threads because the wrench had failed to function/break over, like mine did.

If you have a friend with a beam type torque wrench, you could check your break over calibration setting by rigging drive adapters, to check one wrench against the other. Watch the beam torque wrench indication as you apply torque & note its reading when the break over wrench functions.

So far, all of my HF break over wrenches have been right on the money with my calibrated beam torque wrench, but we never know when we'll mis set, misuse, or the danged break over wrench will fail, we just have to be conscious of what we're doing when doing whatever & try to mitigate Murphys Law paying us a visit when we're in a hurry, or aren't on our toes!!!! lol
 

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don't forget a 3/8 drive inch pound model too i use inch pound and foot pound in the 3/8's and 1/2 inch drive. i use those models in a lot more then any thing else in work i have done on cars then just get a 1/4 inch to 3/8 adaptor sockets to do the 1/4 drive that how mine are set up and all are crapsmen or craftsmen if you will next best to those would be the snap on models i think have the life time warranty and if you do get all those make sure to relive tension on the wrench the quickest way to wreck a torque wrench is leaving the last torque setting on it. so remember to back it off before you put it away.
 
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