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Find the correct resistance rating for temperature at 75F and put in place if idle air temp sensor. it will trick the car computer into thinking the temp is 75F at all times.
Do not bypass the IAT. You'll lose the ability to compensate for temperature. You'll lose tons of power when it's sub-zero (sub-32 for my Fahrenheit-loving neighbours), and risk detonation at warmer temperatures.

gas pedal slack mod.. Ranger Trucks are known for this.. several Taurus's I've seen have the same issue.
Ford deliberately does this to keep the car slowed down.
follow the
gas pedal upwards. you'll see the cable attachment on top.
life the pedal UPwards till it stops. the top part of the pedal will be against the firewall. you will see maybe up to 1/2" of cable sticking out (sometimes more, sometimes less). you need to close that gap! I use cable ties and wrap them around the cable until the slack has been removed. Usually 3 small ones does the trick.
the gas pedal will now be higher than what you're used to. when you romp on the gas, you'll notice the difference.
at full WOT the butterfly plate will be full horizontil, or closer to it.
Good 'mod', I've done it to all my cars. Ford doesn't do it deliberately to slow their cars down. They de-tune when they want to do that. The cable just gets stretched over all the years of use and abuse.

the cap & rotor, well not much to do with this, I use cap& rotors with brass fittings vs. steel or aluminum. they conduct a sneeze better and don't oxidize or corrode as easily.
You can't have a cap & rotor and a coil-pack ignition at the same time. G3 vulcans have no distributor.

If you're brave, get a dremel out with a grinding wheel & see if you can port out the throttle body hole. more air flow = more HP.
same with the intake manifold.. a port & polish kit is relatively cheap, probably take a couple hours to do and you'll notice a gain instantly.
P&P takes a LONG time to do properly. If you're going through the effort, you want to do it properly. Add the intense cleaning you need to make sure you don't get iron filings and aluminum paste pushed through your engine, and it's not a weekend job. If you're so inclined, go to the junkyard and get spares, P&P those, then the weekend job is swapping them over.

But from the OP's tone, I got the feeling he's looking for cheap, easy things to do to get some pep, not turn it into a weekend racer.
 

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I'll add my 2¢. Getting horsepower from any engine is all about moving air in the most efficient way possible. Ok so how do you do this? Find an air filter that is the least restrictive. Open up the exhaust a bit, say 1/4 to 1/2 inch oversize.

I've already done the two above and satisfied with the results. But if I owned a Vulcan 2-other key components for high mileage engines would be replace the timing chain/gear set for a double roller high-performance chain/gear set and install roller rocker arms. Duratecs have roller rocker arms. Roller rocker arms have several benefits: less oil consumption starters, valves open/close with more precision and at the right time and because valves open/close with more precision you'll get more low to mid range torque. Smoother idle is also possible (more vacuum).

Replacing the timing gear set and roller rocker arms shouldn't bust the bank either, if you can do it yourself. Simple fixes for a lot of benefits.

Mass produced rocker arms have never been a good decision in my book.

The last 2-items should increase power, performance and fuel economy.

Horsepower isn't everything, torque plays a key role as well. I don't have a graph between the two engines but I bet the Vulcan develops more torque at a lower rpm than the Duratec.

Monsoon
 

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Probably Duratec has equal torque at low rpm. For the same engine capacity, it has dual intake/exhaust valves, therefore less restrictions on air flow at any rpm - obviously that counts more at higher end, but it does not affect negativelly the low end.
 

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Probably Duratec has equal torque at low rpm. For the same engine capacity, it has dual intake/exhaust valves, therefore less restrictions on air flow at any rpm - obviously that counts more at higher end, but it does not affect negativelly the low end.
Not entirely true. The IMRC is set up to prevent low end torque loss by closing of one set of runners at low RPM. The later Duratecs that don't have the IMRC use other techniques to accomplish the same goal. This setup allows the Duratec to flow more when it needs to, like at mid to high RPM, without having the loss of velocity needed for the good low end torque.
 

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@Zuljin.. you are right, however I live in California.. cold here is 40F at night in the winter.
bypassing the IAT should only be done in warmer climates, I should have been more specific. I have a Gen2 taurus with a cap/rotor, i was referring to my era.
But, coilpacks you can use an MSD if you want..
As for iridium plugs.. I'm still sticking to my own experience with them. I'm running them on my 4.0L Ranger and had better performance with double platnums, which I'll be changing back to.
as for the throttle cable, I've seen this "stretch" on new Rangers. I doubt the cable stretches that much when literally a few months old ?
 

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Whatever you do, DON'T get a "120 volt" alternator. Not likely you could find one but it would cause a lot of problems.
 

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Whatever you do, DON'T get a "120 volt" alternator. Not likely you could find one but it would cause a lot of problems.
120 volt? Is there such a thing? Normally an alternator kicks out 13.5-14.4 volts to charge the 12 volt battery. You can beef up the amps an alternator generates. My stock one produced 110 amps. I added a lot of electrical mods to my car, so I upgraded to a 120 amp alternator. The voltage is controlled by the regulator to ensure that the normal 13.5-14.4 volts are sent to the battery.
 

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Whatever you do, DON'T get a "120 volt" alternator. Not likely you could find one but it would cause a lot of problems.
I think what he means is a 120 amp alternator? I've never seen a Taurus/Sable run on 120 volts. Maybe slot cars?

Monsoon
 
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