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Discussion Starter #1
This is not on the Taurus but my other car, it's a Bright Red Grand Prix GTP. I had some swirling and water spots on the paint that I could not get rid of. So I took it to a well known detailing center in my town and told them that I needed the swirls and spots removed. They said ok and told me I needed it buffed with a polish. I had that done today and am very unhappy that neither issue was fixed. What am I supposed to do now, I have already payed them and now I am still with the same issues? I told the guy about it and he said bring it back Monday and he will put swirl remover on, will this work? And what to do about the water spots? They also lost a piece of the interior, its a black cap that covers the sensor for the automatic headlights, are they responsible for this as it was there when I dropped it off? What do you guys reccomend?
 

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They should be responsible for the piece of the interior. It definitely shouldn't come back missing parts.
 

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Get the part back or have them order you a new one from Ford and give them one more shot at doing the polish buffing correct.

I've been burned by letting other people do work on my cars so many times, taking it to someone else is an absolute last resort.

For the swirl marks and the water spots on red, definitely one of the tougher things to remove if they are "really in there". As a last resort on another car of mine I had to buy coloured car wax and buff it in on those swirl marks only, very slowly adding a thin layer of wax at a time. I do not recommend coloured car wax for anything else, do not do your whole car with it.
 

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If you posted some pictures it would be much easier to tell you what you need.

Mike
:dunno:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Update on this. Took it back Monday, they found the part that was missing and superglued it back on which I am not to happy about. And they applied swirl remover to my dirty car. I picked it up and there were bugs on the front as well as dust still on the back bumper. Also had the overspray from the tire dressing they put on Friday when it was there. I really think there are more swirls on the sides of the car then there was before. I really don't know what to do at this point. I am thinking I should turn them into the Better Business Bureau, or demand my money back as they did more damage then good. Looks like I am gonna have to learn how to polish with the PC to fix this mess.
 

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QUOTE (shoboy07 @ Mar 25 2009, 12:38 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=712188
I should turn them into the Better Business Bureau, or demand my money back as they did more damage then good. Looks like I am gonna have to learn how to polish with the PC to fix this mess.[/b]
Yes, to the BBB report. Yes, ask for your money back and explain to them as nicely as you can in writing why. Yes, to polishing it yourself.

Some of my happiest moments are when I'm waxing and polishing my car.
 

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QUOTE (shoboy07 @ Mar 25 2009, 01:38 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=712188
Update on this. Took it back Monday, they found the part that was missing and superglued it back on which I am not to happy about. And they applied swirl remover to my dirty car. I picked it up and there were bugs on the front as well as dust still on the back bumper. Also had the overspray from the tire dressing they put on Friday when it was there. I really think there are more swirls on the sides of the car then there was before. I really don't know what to do at this point. I am thinking I should turn them into the Better Business Bureau, or demand my money back as they did more damage then good. Looks like I am gonna have to learn how to polish with the PC to fix this mess.[/b]
Who in the heck is this place? Some people that call themselves detailers couldn't be further from the truth. Check out some of the detailing guru forums like http://www.detailingbliss.com/forum/ and http://www.autopia.org/forum/ Great advice if you are looking for a true professional detail.
 

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In your original post you said "well known Detailing center"

I would find the guys with a good reputation instead.

Mike
:dunno:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So what steps should I do to get the paint back in shape. I am guessing a compound, polish, and wax? What products do I need. I have a pc that I am borrowing from my dad, I just need to know what products are good.
 

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If you have the proper backing plate and pads for the PC:

Once you do a through wash, you'll need to clay the vehicle to remove contaminants in the clear coat. Next, you'll need some kind of compound to get micromarring out (I prefer using Optimum). Next, find a good polish on a different pad (once again I recommended Optimum). Finally, a nice last step product/wax/protectant. 1Z Glanz is a seriously awesome LSP as it has great longevity and gives the vehicle a great shine. But being that GP Red...IIRC, it may not even have any metallic flake in it, thus you may not achieve quite the gloss you may want.
 

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QUOTE (shoboy07 @ Mar 29 2009, 06:34 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=713433
Where can I get Optimum? And I think I need to buy pads, what kind should I get?[/b]
I generally buy detailing products from http://www.autogeek.com

I recently picked up some new pads from Lake Country: http://www.autogeek.net/lakecountry.html You'll need the correct backing plate for your PC to properly use pads. http://www.autogeek.net/porter-cable-7424-...ing-plates.html Rubber one here will reduce the vibrations...porter cables will wear your arms out!

Depending on the size of the backing plate, will determine what pad size to use. The bigger the pad, the more the vibration. Course a smaller one will be easier to work with, but will not cover as much paint at once. I would get an orange light cutting pad (for working with the compound), a white polishing pad at least (for polishing).
 

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shoboy7,

Sorry to hear about your "detail(er)" mishap. Sounds like your finish is suffering from swirls (usually washed induced or other forms of abrasion) and most likely RIDS (Random Isolated Deep Scratches, Random In Depth Scratches... all mean the same idea). Swirls as I mentioned before are mostly commonly seen in moderate to heavy lighting, i.e. sunlight, and appear as a collection of, swirls or also referred to as "spider-webbing".

How To Fix!

There are numerous approaches to fixing or correcting these issues. There are products that Meguiar's makes that are OTC that will help the appearance of scratches, I witnessed this at a recent Meguiar's Class held at AutoGeek's Detail Fest 4. Very labor intensive, but possible. Using a machine such as a DA or Random Orbit machine will yield much better results. The plan of attack varies greatly, due to the intensity of the swirls and RIDS in combination with the hardness of the paint surface.

Now keep in mind I am speaking from a limited background and research in the concept of paint care and maintenance, mainly as an enthusiast. BullGeek mentioned Optimum products. They are very good products, but possibly not as user friendly, depending on the paint being worked.... Before you get all excited and start trying to figure out how the fix/diminish some of those scratches, you need to learn the proper techniques of cleaning and maintaining the surface before you put all the time into polishing out the scratches, and seeking them resurface after your first wash.

Autopia.org is a great resource, my first that got me started. Chances are, any question you may have, has been posted there. The search function is your friend!

Washing:
2BM - 2 Bucket Method including the use of a Grit Guard in each bucket. The Grit Guard is a plastic medium, placed at the bottom of the bucket that keeps your wash media from touching the bottom of the bucket, where all the dirt and abrasives are located. The design of the Grit Guard base, also helps keep the dirt/contaminants from re-swirling around in the bucket.
Bucket 1 - water with wash solution (i.e. soap)usually 1-2 oz. of soap are good for 3-5 gallons of water (estimate) (Grit Guard inside)
Bucket 2 - clean water for rinsing wash media (Grit Guard inside)

** Do NOT Recommend the use of Dawn, dish washing detergents. Common to popular belief. It is thought that Dawn will strip any wax/protection on the car. It may and it may not, but it is rather aggressive on the plastic/rubber trim, aiding to their drying out and fading.

Wash Media: T-shirts, old rags, etc... NO. They are abrasive and will scratch the surface. Wool wash mitts, microfiber wash sponges, mits, etc...

Frequent rinse of the wash media to remove contaminants on the wash media's surface. You can make 1-2 passes on the surface and rinse the media (use judgement based on how dirty the painted surface is)

Drying: Again, no T-shirts, rags, etc... Use a quality Waffle Weave towel or plush microfiber towel . I've been using a combination of both. Blotting with the waffle weave (WW) to absorb the water and a plush microfiber (MF) to gently wipe away any remaining water. Key is to not drag, or as little as possible your drying media on the paint surface to above scratching the surface. If you are going to clay the vehicle, then I wouldn't worry about precisely drying the vehicle, as you need a lubricant to aid the clay bar so it can perform it's duty of shearing off any contaminants embedded in the paint surface. A simple solution of water mixed with a minimal amount of car soap is a good start.

Once clayed, you're ready for prepping the surface with an AIO (All-In-One) product to remove oxidation, minor water spots (as long as it's not water etching) to really see what you have to work with. Then you can move onto to polishing/compounding if need be and ultimately a wax or sealant to protect your work. I can post more info if you'd like.

Please post photos of the paint surface you are referring to as it will help myself and others assist you further. I've found the paint on my '05 Taurus to be rather hard, so working with a PC took me a while and I didn't get all the defect I wanted out. There is a compounding product from Meguiar's that I have seen perform some awesome results with a PC. I would read up on it first to see if this is an aggressive method that is needed, this is where good detailed photo's help.

A little help to get you started ;)

- Chris
 

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So the GF's car got spotted just recently. I think its pretty bad. Sorry about the poor pics, all I have is my phone for now.





Would the clay bar technique work for this or are we looking at going to a detailer?
 

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Yeah I used to see them on cars alot when I worked at a dealership. They really can ruin the look of a corvette lol. So I'm worried about her car...
 

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Exide detail
Pakshak

Several other places.

If a car has tree sap on it you need to wash and clay it before you ever get out the PC.

Mike
B)
 
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