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I was at the J/Y the other day and ran across a 2002 thats brake lines were in mint shape. I would like to just pull them off that car and put them on my Gen III. I figured I could coat the lines with Rust Bullet, and just put slap them on. Would they fit?
 

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Do you have rear discs? If so, the drum lines will not work, and in reality, brake hoses are very cheap.

When I swapped rear discs onto my Gen IV, the rear hoses cost me:

LR: $12
RR: $18

And the front hoses are:

LF: $22
RF: $24

Don't ever put a used part like this on your car.

JR
 

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The 2002 does not have a bias block.

He PM'd me about this, and we already worked it out that it won't work. Besides the fact that it's an insane PITA to get the lines out of the car, he'll have to have the ABS pump bled at the dealer.

JR
 

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2000 is the only g4 equipped with a bias block. Just in case anyone was curious.
 

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I was at the J/Y the other day and ran across a 2002 thats brake lines were in mint shape. I would like to just pull them off that car and put them on my Gen III. I figured I could coat the lines with Rust Bullet, and just put slap them on. Would they fit?
[/b]

For salty roads, I've heard Cunifer (Cu-Ni-Fe) is the way to go.

Available here:
http://www.fedhillusa.com/
 

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The 2002 does not have a bias block.

He PM'd me about this, and we already worked it out that it won't work. Besides the fact that it's an insane PITA to get the lines out of the car, he'll have to have the ABS pump bled at the dealer.

JR
[/b]
You don't have to do an ABS bleed when changing lines. The only time you have to bleed the HCU is when you replace it, or if you've gotten air into the valves by having the ABS engage while you have air in the system. Otherwise, the valves in the HCU are positioned so that the brake fluid flows from the master, thru the HCU and to the wheels, and isn't trapped in the HCU anywhere. That's why you can suck air thru the master when bleeding the brakes, refill it, and continue with a normal bleed, and remove all the air. An ABS service bleed activates the valves in the HCU to force air out of them, so as long as there's no air in them, you don't need to do it.

FWIW, i wouldn't bother trying to remove the lines from one car to put onto another anyway. Brake like is fairly cheap, and it would be less work to just make up your own lines than to try swapping from another car.
 

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[
it would be less work to just make up your own lines than to try swapping from another car.
[/b]

Any helpful hints on how to bend brake lines?

The ones I've replaced look like crap. I took my old aerostar to a mechanic who replaced the brake line by running a new line down the driveshaft tunnel instead of tucking it up againest the rocker panels. On the sable that I had the rear lines replaced last week, the mechanic tried to tuck them up agianest the rocker panel but only hit one of the retaining clips, the lines cross when they should be parallel and are bent where they should be straight. They hang down so they are visible from the side of the car. I'm afraid if I hit a chunck of ice or something it will tear them off.

I have seen quality brake line installations, the guy down the steet restored a Ford GPA. The brake lines followed the contour on the inside of the hull beautifully. How do you do it?

Working in one plane would be hard enough but two planes and not all bends at 90 degrees throws me. Prebent lines are available (inline tube) for older cars but not newer ones.
 

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<div class='quotemain'>
The 2002 does not have a bias block.

He PM'd me about this, and we already worked it out that it won't work. Besides the fact that it's an insane PITA to get the lines out of the car, he'll have to have the ABS pump bled at the dealer.

JR
[/b]
You don't have to do an ABS bleed when changing lines. The only time you have to bleed the HCU is when you replace it, or if you've gotten air into the valves by having the ABS engage while you have air in the system. Otherwise, the valves in the HCU are positioned so that the brake fluid flows from the master, thru the HCU and to the wheels, and isn't trapped in the HCU anywhere. That's why you can suck air thru the master when bleeding the brakes, refill it, and continue with a normal bleed, and remove all the air. An ABS service bleed activates the valves in the HCU to force air out of them, so as long as there's no air in them, you don't need to do it.

FWIW, i wouldn't bother trying to remove the lines from one car to put onto another anyway. Brake like is fairly cheap, and it would be less work to just make up your own lines than to try swapping from another car.
[/b][/quote]

Highjack-couldn't you just find a dirt road and hit the brakes a couple of times to activate the antilock brakes and then do a regular bleed again? I think I need to do this on my 98'. The brakes haven't been very firm since the ABS module changeout. Highjack over :ph34r:
 

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<div class='quotemain'>
<div class='quotemain'>
The 2002 does not have a bias block.

He PM'd me about this, and we already worked it out that it won't work. Besides the fact that it's an insane PITA to get the lines out of the car, he'll have to have the ABS pump bled at the dealer.

JR
[/b]
You don't have to do an ABS bleed when changing lines. The only time you have to bleed the HCU is when you replace it, or if you've gotten air into the valves by having the ABS engage while you have air in the system. Otherwise, the valves in the HCU are positioned so that the brake fluid flows from the master, thru the HCU and to the wheels, and isn't trapped in the HCU anywhere. That's why you can suck air thru the master when bleeding the brakes, refill it, and continue with a normal bleed, and remove all the air. An ABS service bleed activates the valves in the HCU to force air out of them, so as long as there's no air in them, you don't need to do it.

FWIW, i wouldn't bother trying to remove the lines from one car to put onto another anyway. Brake like is fairly cheap, and it would be less work to just make up your own lines than to try swapping from another car.
[/b][/quote]

Highjack-couldn't you just find a dirt road and hit the brakes a couple of times to activate the antilock brakes and then do a regular bleed again? I think I need to do this on my 98'. The brakes haven't been very firm since the ABS module changeout. Highjack over :ph34r:
[/b][/quote]
I suppose you could try that, but you have to think of two things - first, how safe would that be? Second, you need to get all the valves to open and close, which means you'd have to make sure all 4 tires tried to lock up while you were doing it. Since you don't really have a good way of doing that, it's easier and safer to have it done properly at a dealership. Also, if only the ABS module was replaced, it shouldn't affect the HCU, since they are separate units. Even if they had to remove the HCU from the car to get the ECU off of it, any air that got into the ports in the HCU should pass right thru while doing a normal bleed, without getting trapped in the valves.
 

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<div class='quotemain'>
<div class='quotemain'>
<div class='quotemain'>
The 2002 does not have a bias block.

He PM'd me about this, and we already worked it out that it won't work. Besides the fact that it's an insane PITA to get the lines out of the car, he'll have to have the ABS pump bled at the dealer.

JR
[/b]
You don't have to do an ABS bleed when changing lines. The only time you have to bleed the HCU is when you replace it, or if you've gotten air into the valves by having the ABS engage while you have air in the system. Otherwise, the valves in the HCU are positioned so that the brake fluid flows from the master, thru the HCU and to the wheels, and isn't trapped in the HCU anywhere. That's why you can suck air thru the master when bleeding the brakes, refill it, and continue with a normal bleed, and remove all the air. An ABS service bleed activates the valves in the HCU to force air out of them, so as long as there's no air in them, you don't need to do it.

FWIW, i wouldn't bother trying to remove the lines from one car to put onto another anyway. Brake like is fairly cheap, and it would be less work to just make up your own lines than to try swapping from another car.
[/b][/quote]

Highjack-couldn't you just find a dirt road and hit the brakes a couple of times to activate the antilock brakes and then do a regular bleed again? I think I need to do this on my 98'. The brakes haven't been very firm since the ABS module changeout. Highjack over :ph34r:
[/b][/quote]
I suppose you could try that, but you have to think of two things - first, how safe would that be? Second, you need to get all the valves to open and close, which means you'd have to make sure all 4 tires tried to lock up while you were doing it. Since you don't really have a good way of doing that, it's easier and safer to have it done properly at a dealership. Also, if only the ABS module was replaced, it shouldn't affect the HCU, since they are separate units. Even if they had to remove the HCU from the car to get the ECU off of it, any air that got into the ports in the HCU should pass right thru while doing a normal bleed, without getting trapped in the valves.
[/b][/quote]

Hmmm, I guess I'll take it to the dealer and have them do it. I just think there is something wrong since the brakes on my 97' (stock brakes) are a lot more firm and stop a lot better than the my 98' (PBR calipers and ss brake lines).
 

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<div class='quotemain'>
[
it would be less work to just make up your own lines than to try swapping from another car.
[/b]

Any helpful hints on how to bend brake lines?

The ones I've replaced look like crap. I took my old aerostar to a mechanic who replaced the brake line by running a new line down the driveshaft tunnel instead of tucking it up againest the rocker panels. On the sable that I had the rear lines replaced last week, the mechanic tried to tuck them up agianest the rocker panel but only hit one of the retaining clips, the lines cross when they should be parallel and are bent where they should be straight. They hang down so they are visible from the side of the car. I'm afraid if I hit a chunck of ice or something it will tear them off.

I have seen quality brake line installations, the guy down the steet restored a Ford GPA. The brake lines followed the contour on the inside of the hull beautifully. How do you do it?

Working in one plane would be hard enough but two planes and not all bends at 90 degrees throws me. Prebent lines are available (inline tube) for older cars but not newer ones.
[/b][/quote]
Bending the lines nicely is tricky. Your best best is to pick up a tubing bender to use, as trying to bend them with your hand will often lead to putting kinks in the lines. You could also use a socket to bend the line around - i do that sometimes. The taurus brake lines are a pain to get looking really nice when you do them, since there are so many different angles. I just get them as good as i can, and use zip ties to keep them secured up out of the way. If there are spots where they rub, and you can't fix it, put a small piece of rubber hose or something similar around the line in that spot to prevent it from rubbing thru.
 
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