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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My method, some may get something from this, others might want to pass on by.

I keep these pics in a notebook that I keep for my cars, and other family members that I help keep up. Mostly rusty rotors issues in the rust belt. Never wear out pads unless they rust in the yoke and stick.

First I find these tools work best. These are just the helpful ones, and of course the necessary like lug wrench, jack, and such are obvious.

In the pic Brake 1 I find compressing the piston in place saves effort and frustration. You need a really big C clamp. I open the bleeder and push the fluid out while compressing. Thus it does not overflow the reservoir, and does not push the dirty fluid back up the line.

In the pic Brake 2 the finsihed product, with the little alignment tool I made. I use this to aligh the caliper to yoke, the hole and remove to start the bolts. Those seem hard to get in line, and working from the back is a hinderance.

I wire bursh the flange face to get loose rust off, and put grease on the part of the hub (alignment pilot) for the rotor. I wire brush the yoke area where the pads fit and use proper grease. I check to see that the new pads fit freely in the yoke, and adjust the anti-rattle springs straight up before putting the caliper on.

I have made hold in place nuts to keep the rotor in place while installing the pads and caliper.

In this case, I had already flushed the system when I put new wheel cylinders on the back. So job done, reservoir still on the fill line. Brakes work fine.

Other past experience. For family member, Buick Van, dealer installed pads, GM, and they ran hot. I jacked it up, could barely turn the wheel. Removed wheel and easily removed the caliper, so that is not it. Still could not turn the flange with the caliper off. Had to pry the pads out of the yoke. The GM pads had burrs on the edges that went against the stainless guides. Quick hit with a fine flat file and the pads slipped back easliy. No more issues with those. So point is: pads must slip freely in the yoke. Ford desigh should fit loose in the yoke, and they use the spring on top to maintain friction and keep the pads steady when not braking. The GM uses SS very thin inserts that spring out to control rattle. In any case, the pads should be at least finger push easily.

Happy braking.

-chart-
 

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I am using a cylinder compressor from the parts store - I don't like pushing (maybe scratching) my rotors like you do :)
And you forgot to add grease (special one for brakes) on the back and on the sliding surfaces of pads? That's why sometimes they don't slide back and rub against the rotor or they squeak.

Front disc tool:

Rear discs have the cylinder screwing back in with this:
 

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Cake monster
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I am using a cylinder compressor from the parts store - I don't like pushing (maybe scratching) my rotors like you do :)
And you forgot to add grease (special one for brakes) on the back and on the sliding surfaces of pads? That's why sometimes they don't slide back and rub against the rotor or they squeak.

Front disc tool:
Those things suck, I split the plastic handle right off of it on the second use, I'm gonna get something made entirely of metal to replace it.
 

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Wow, you didn't open the bleed screw? I do that sometimes, but still I never broke mine...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Rear Disc Tools

I am using a cylinder compressor from the parts store - I don't like pushing (maybe scratching) my rotors like you do :)
And you forgot to add grease (special one for brakes) on the back and on the sliding surfaces of pads? That's why sometimes they don't slide back and rub against the rotor or they squeak.

Front disc tool:

Rear discs have the cylinder screwing back in with this:

Here is mine, made years ago when finding on was difficult. First one I remember doing was on a '91 Lincoln Cont. That was when I learned to open the bleeder screw. Mine is not universal, only for FORD products.

And I did mention special grease for sliding surfaces. However wire brushing first is equally important. I check the guide pins but never had one not free on my stuff.

-chart-
 

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Cake monster
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Wow, you didn't open the bleed screw? I do that sometimes, but still I never broke mine...
I'm good at forgetting sometimes :p It didn't take much, the handle broke right after two forceful turns. I can't imagine a mechanic using it daily, unless they sold them by the dozen. I'm pretty horrible to my tools, I bent a 12mm box end wrench last month, I just bought a new 95 piece screwdriver set, and ruined one after using it on 3 screws, chewed the head right off of it. I went back with it and said "Hi, I bought this yesterday and broke it today" :lol2:

I'm good at ruining tools.
 

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Cake monster
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Here is mine, made years ago when finding on was difficult. First one I remember doing was on a '91 Lincoln Cont. That was when I learned to open the bleeder screw. Mine is not universal, only for FORD products.

And I did mention special grease for sliding surfaces. However wire brushing first is equally important. I check the guide pins but never had one not free on my stuff.

-chart-
Nice tool. I did a brake job on my Taurus before getting rid of it, one pin on the drivers side seized so I took it out to my friends and he heated it out for me, then I installed a new set of pins.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Brake maint.

Nice tool. I did a brake job on my Taurus before getting rid of it, one pin on the drivers side seized so I took it out to my friends and he heated it out for me, then I installed a new set of pins.
I think getting in water does much harm. Way back when I had a '55 ford, I went across a small river on a crossing and was in water about a foot deep, but good footing. Few days later, both rear axel bearing began to make noise. "Pressed on" ball bearings were not much fun. I did not have access to a press, so I did some shade tree fix. My press consisted of an anvil and a piece of iron pipe.

-chart-
 

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I'm good at ruining tools.
Looks like you have some super-strong hands - I would hate to see you pissed of if the last case is true :)
I have some cheap 12mm box-wrench and even on those it takes some "juice" to bend that sucker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Tough Tools

Looks like you have some super-strong hands - I would hate to see you pissed of if the last case is true :)
I have some cheap 12mm box-wrench and even on those it takes some "juice" to bend that sucker.
If one used good tools, little leverage will not hurt them.
Pic of my favorite for removing lugs others put on with an impact.

14" Williams flex and 25" cheater. Save the back, remove the professional tire changer error. I also have a 100 #'ft beam torque wrench. To put lugs on right, I just pull it to the end of it's travel. Done. Done right the first time. If I have a flat on the road, they will not be an issue to remove.:withstupid:

-chart-
 

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Cake monster
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Here's a picture of the 12mm box end. I actually did it with my foot, I was removing the 12 point bolts off the driveshaft on a ford truck, they were stronger than the wrench, after that I smartened up and got my 1/2" breaker bar out and a 12-point socket.



It's a crescent brand wrench, I thought they were fairly strong up until I bent the 12mm. I used cheater pipes on them with success. The one on the bottom is from my new set, I had to replace the entire set.
 
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