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hey guys last time i did my brakes i did rotos and pads in the front. starting last month i noticed than in like 3 days after cleaning they were super dirty!

just lately, i cleaned them after a long drive and noticed the rims themselves were HOT! and my friend pointed out how shiny my rotors were, which i didnt pick up on.

So im trying to figure out if ive done something wrong, i did them just like ive always done brakes, just pop the pads in the reset the piston.

so basically my front 4 pads are all crap or i screwed something up. they spit terrible dust now, but ive only had them maybe 5 months, so they still brake fine, not sure what the problem is exactly but im gunna have it in the shop next week to see whats going on. just hoping to figure something out here.
 

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Yep, it can be a problem or worse the calipers.

What you need to do is get a drill, with a nice long wire brush. Now, take out the slider pins, clean the old grease off of them, if there is any rust on them, grind/polish them fully clean. With the long wire brush, insert it inside the slider pin hole and clean that place up. Then grease the pins and a bit in the holes better more than less imo.

Thats pretty much it.
 

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Also if you have rear drums check them for proper adjustment. If the self-adjusting mechanism doesn't work you'll go through front pads very fast.
 

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80% of my friends that do their own brakes never clean or use grease on the new pads sliding points or on the back plate. And then they complain about low gas milage, hot rotors, bad braking and eventually sqeaking...
Check the sliders too. Don't wipe that grease out if it is working - it's special (high temperature) grease!

Just read a how-to carefully in the Haynes/Chilton manual or online.
 

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80% of my friends that do their own brakes never clean or use grease on the new pads sliding points or on the back plate. And then they complain about low gas milage, hot rotors, bad braking and eventually sqeaking...
Check the sliders too. Don't wipe that grease out if it is working - it's special (high temperature) grease!

Just read a how-to carefully in the Haynes/Chilton manual or online.
Well grease that has contaminants in it isn't better. You should really change it I do believe. Obviously you should use a grease that has the same priorities or better.

You can find caliper slider pin grease at any autoparts.
 

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The sliding pins have rubber booths on them to keep contaminants out. In my Haynes manual is a warning about wiping the original grease off - "at the time of writing, there is no substitute available for that grease".

If you don't have something equal or better to put back in, better don't mess with it. Regular grease on back of brake pads (or sliders) will be baked and become a crust.
 

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Pins

The sliding pins have rubber booths on them to keep contaminants out. In my Haynes manual is a warning about wiping the original grease off - "at the time of writing, there is no substitute available for that grease".

If you don't have something equal or better to put back in, better don't mess with it. Regular grease on back of brake pads (or sliders) will be baked and become a crust.
Agree:

In my Taurus/Sables and Lincolns, never had a pin that was not free. If it ain't broke, ..

If I had one binding, I would buy a new yoke. Included pins and bushings, and seals.

If the pins are the problem, then only the outer pads would be worn/damaged. Easy to tell.

And a reminder. Ford pads are 'rattle loose' in the yokes. They must be that way. The antirattle is done with the spring on top. The free play causes a very slight rotation forward to reverse keeping them from developing the scoring lines. Other brands like many GM use SS inserts that provide a antirattle on the ends of the pads.

New pads may have faulty ends due to bad shearing of the metal backing. Not common but I have seen it. GM brand.

So imortant the pads in Ford just fall in place. Yokes must be cleaned and greased.

Possible to have pads too thick. Might get them on but when the rotor gets warm it expands and binds. As it binds, it expands more, tighetning them more and the downward spiral begins.
I saw that possible on a F-150. Son-inlaw got one side on easy, other bit tight and he wanted to borrow my rubber mallet. Whoo, not going to happen. I went to his his house, checked to see the piston was al the way in, and it was, but the pads were a bit too thick for the application. I sanded them on my disc sander a bit, washed them in soap and water to be sure no grit left. Slipped in place, worked fine.

-chart-
 

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In my Haynes manual is a warning about wiping the original grease off - "at the time of writing, there is no substitute available for that grease".

If you don't have something equal or better to put back in, better don't mess with it. Regular grease on back of brake pads (or sliders) will be baked and become a crust.
I have always used the green permatex, which is the basic one, it has always stood up, but now that I visit their website, my mouth just fell open.

Green (Synthetic, 400°F)
Red (Synthetic Silicone Based, 550°F)
PURPLE (Synthetic with Ceramic Solids, 3000°F :eek:) <<<---- I want.
 

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Brake Check

hey guys last time i did my brakes i did rotos and pads in the front. starting last month i noticed than in like 3 days after cleaning they were super dirty!

just lately, i cleaned them after a long drive and noticed the rims themselves were HOT! and my friend pointed out how shiny my rotors were, which i didnt pick up on.

So im trying to figure out if ive done something wrong, i did them just like ive always done brakes, just pop the pads in the reset the piston.

so basically my front 4 pads are all crap or i screwed something up. they spit terrible dust now, but ive only had them maybe 5 months, so they still brake fine, not sure what the problem is exactly but im gunna have it in the shop next week to see whats going on. just hoping to figure something out here.
Diag Brake Drag.
Brake checks.
  1. Safely secure the car.
  2. Shift to N.
  3. Loosen slightly lug nuts one wheel. SLIGHTLY
  4. Jack it up.
  5. Wheel should turn freely.
  6. If so, push the brake pedal in and release slowly.
  7. If wheel turns freely, keep you foot off the brake while driving.
  8. If the wheel binds you have secured the evidence.
  9. Check to see that the brake pedal comes all the way to the top.
  10. Remove the wheel.
  11. Remove the caliper bolts.
  12. Remove the caliper, if it is tight that is the problem.
  13. Pads can be too thick, or piston sticking.
  14. If the caliper slips out freely, check the pins for free movement.
  15. If the pads are stuck in the yoke you have found the problem.
  16. Remove the yokes and wire brush and sand the sliding surfaces with fine paper.
  17. Check pad backing for burrs on the surfaces that contact the yoke.
Brief way to secure evidence.

-chart- (the old coot, old shop teacher)
 

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Chart, you used to be able to buy a loaded caliper mount bracket with all the necessary hardware, but now most parts stores sell everything individually. Mo money! Absolute best lube to use on slide pins is never-seize. Clean old grease off pins and slather on liberally. 3M markets it in a brush-can labeled brake lube, but any anti-seize is fine.
 

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no i didnt, could that be my issue?
Probably, so.

Don't worry...I did the very same thing years ago and warped some rotors. Hopefully you're not there yet.

I started using hi-temp anti seize on my brake components. According to the Permatex website you can use it on anything that's slow or non-moving to lubricate and prevent seize...it's good to 1600F. My wife Chrysler T&C had parking brake components that would keep freezing up with regular hi-temp grease. I put a coating of hi temp anti-seize on the last time and it's been working great since. I use it on the pins, back of the pads, drum shoe adjusters, and anywhere a pad or shoe has a chance to rub and cause noise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
the rotors are definetly screwed now, i get that wobble feeling at only about 30mph, the kind that ive only felt once before when i had loose lug nuts (i checked all my lugs and they were all tight today) so im assuming the rotor is out of round.
 

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If Haynes manual says not to clean caliper pins and re-grease them, Haynes is spreading misinformation. sheila recommended anti-seize. I believe anti-seize is silicone based grease with aluminum power. Temperature-wise it is the best kind. "Wheel bearing grease for disk brake" will work well, too. These greases will not last the life of caliper pins. Neither does the oem grease.
 

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Caliper

Chart, you used to be able to buy a loaded caliper mount bracket with all the necessary hardware, but now most parts stores sell everything individually. Mo money! Absolute best lube to use on slide pins is never-seize. Clean old grease off pins and slather on liberally. 3M markets it in a brush-can labeled brake lube, but any anti-seize is fine.
Pic of approx what I used, only time I had to replace a caliper on this line of cars. RockAuto lists several with the mounting bracket. I find the brackets wear/rust badly here in the NE. I never greased a pin though, all mine were free floating, but I check them. If I needed to grease, I would use high temp antisieze.

Had a friend with a Chrysler product that was greasing the pins on one side every 2 months and they still stuck. Bad wear on pads on one side. I suggested new yoke, pins, caliper. There must be a reason the pins are free, but bind when the caliper is tightened. I am guessing the pins were not parallel when tightened, bent pin or non flat caliper face. And the wear was mostly on the outside pad, right side. Other side fine.

-chart-
 

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Well, Haynes did say that wasn't a replacement for that grease a long time ago. Maybe now it is. I am using the one from the parts store store special for breaks (high-temperature)... Antiseize is high-temperature too but I don't think is as good lubricant as grease.
 

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Pin Grease

If Haynes manual says not to clean caliper pins and re-grease them, Haynes is spreading misinformation. sheila recommended anti-seize. I believe anti-seize is silicone based grease with aluminum power. Temperature-wise it is the best kind. "Wheel bearing grease for disk brake" will work well, too. These greases will not last the life of caliper pins. Neither does the oem grease.
My last word: logic?

OK the pins do not get hot. If they did, that rubber seal would be toast.

So How could they get more than warm?

Anyway, wheel bearing grease is intended to stay where you put it.
Other greases are mobile and intended to be confined by rubber seals, but move around to keep things lubed. Like CV joints and such.

In face, I would be tempted to use CV joint grease, that is if I ever needed to grease a pin. I got some CV grease!:lol2:
Problem is, if you get it on your hands it will make them slick for a long time. Slime!

OK, my last word.

Going to Pick A Part lookin for a hood!;)

-chart-
 

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Good luck at the JY, Chart, if you are lucky, you will find one in the right color!
 

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Hood

Good luck at the JY, Chart, if you are lucky, you will find one in the right color!
Yep, posted a pic already. Same year, same paint color, no scratches or dents. I look every other day at their web site and they have pictures with arrive dates. Pic said Sable, text said Taurus. Picture do not lie.

When my daughter and I arrived, second trip with tools, two guys were under the hood. Looking for those rubber ell's that go on the valve covers, that rot off. They had no luck with this one. They had removed the PCV to intake hose and someone had duct taped it together and it fell apart. Can imagine what that one ran like.

Had to remove the grille as they wanted to charge more ($16) with the grille. It was broken. Easy to remove. I had already taken my old one out at home along with the insulation. Hood is a bit awkward to carry. Some nice guys held the door open for us to get in and out of the office.

So, I am one tired old dude now. Good tired.

-chart-
 
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