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Discussion Starter #1
Not experienced w/brakes, just have done oil & tune-ups, etc..
but can't afford to pay mech, so i will just follow the Haynes manual,
but just wondering if i need any special tools? C-clamp?
It's on my 98 Taurus SE w/105K. i a planning to turn the rotors,
they look very solid and pretty new, i just bought the car.
thanks
 

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I am doing this and new rotors right now. The c-clamp or the $9 tool from AutoZone will work to compress the piston. Otherwise, it is very easy, make sure you torque to specs, even your lugsnuts! Pretty easy job and I am a hobbyist mor than a mechanic. My new rotors were $30 a piece...you can turn them cheaper, but they are know to warp, so if they are geting thin, just buy new ones.
Good luck!
 

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Oh sorry, you will need a 15mm socket, a 12mm socket a 10mm socket, a C-clamp, some wire to hang the caliper, a lug wrench, jack, jack stands, brake fluid and brake cleaner. Oh and the right pads, AZ gave me the wrong ones, but the rotors were correct.
GL!
 

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And thread locker. You should reinstall the brake caliper bolts and the caliper bracket bolts (if you remove the rotors) with thread locking compound. While you have the caliper off, you can relube the caliper pins. Caliper lube comes in little 99 cent packets. Before you squeeze the piston in you may want to use a turkey baster to remove some fluid from the master cylinder.
 

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Definitely remove some fluid from the MC. Dot 3 brake fluid is a pretty nasty corrosive, and when you compress the piston, you're going to send a good amount of fluid back into the MC resevoir. If you overflow it, you're going to be taking the chance that the brake fluid will get on your engine components. It won't corrode it quickly, but over time might cause problems.

You might want to bleed the brakes as well.

If you decide that you want to replace the rear pads, remember that you can't compress the piston to put the caliper back on with a c-clamp...you need to turn the piston with a set of needle-nosed pliers to compress it in it's bore. I think you turn it counter-clockwise, but I might be wrong.

JR
 

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Best thing to do is to open the bleeder valve and put a 1/4" ID hose on it when you push in the piston. This way no contaminated fluid gets forced into the MC. Also be sure to get good pads. Money spent on quality pads will eliminate the warping, which is really pad material being deposited on the rotor.

Use Valvoline synthetic brake fluid. Only cost a $1 or so more and is much better fluid than regular DOT 3.

I use anti-seize on the pins. Gave up using silicone after 20 years of lackluster results.

Use the thread locker but us it sparingly.

Also after a 100 miles of use be sure to aggresively bed in the pads by doing three 60-5 mph, ABS kickin' stops in a row. Then limping home and letting the brakes cool completely.
 

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Get a torque wrench for the lug nuts, too. Unless of course you like warping your rotors.
 
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