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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to replace my current brakes since they are getting long in the tooth. (I think) I found a good deal on Brembo brakes.

-2 new Brembo OEM replacement (not slotted or drilled) front brake rotors (model 27043)
-2 new Brembo OEM replacement rear brake drums (model 23035)

All for $192 shipped to my door. This seems like a good price to me since when comparing to mid-range brakes from autozone or advance it looks to be about similar in price, if not cheaper. Can I get this any cheaper?

For pads/shoes, I was thinking of using Duralast Gold Cmax DGC601 and Duralast Brake Shoes in conjunction with the Brembo hardware. I want to maximize performance and life of my brakes as I hope to keep the car (and these new brakes) going for at least another 75-100k miles. Does this seem like a good package for my money? Should I go for different pads/shoes? A penny for your thoughts and recommendations...

By the way, I'm moving to a more hill-ier area and that is another reason I want to sort of upgrade my brakes.
 

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Expensive rotors really aren't necessary. My combo is wearever rotors (cheapest advanced auto had) and Wagner Thermoquiet ceramic pads. I installed them in the middle of the summer, and am very pleased with the results. Not a trace of dust, and the rotors have held up great so far, and I can tend to the aggressive side as far as braking goes. If you want an actual upgrade, you could try 11.6'' rotors from the GenIVs, dual piston calipers, drum to disc swap in the rear, or more aggressive pads (which would be harder on the rotors).

I haven't done my rear brakes yet, so no advice there.
 

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I know for a fact that the cheaper Autozone rotors will be just fine for the daily driver. You want to invest in good pads, and I've heard great things about the EBC greenstuf and EBC yellow pads as well as HAWK pads.

Rear shoes can also run with some AZ parts. Have had no trouble with mine since I changed the shoes in my '01 Sable.

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Go to the bigger rotors and pads. It's the same caliper, but you get more surface area on both the rotor and the pads, and much more swept area.

I've got a set of the 11.6" brackets that I could part with. They've been sandblasted, so they're nice and clean. All you'd need are new rotors and pads.

JR
 

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Would the 11.6" brakes fit with his wheels?
FWIW, I did a brake job recently and here is about how it was priced:
-2 new Wearever brake rotors: $60
-2 new brake drums (I think I got them at O'Reiley's): $70
-Hardware kit for drum brakes: $10
-Wearever Gold Semi-Metallic brake pads: $35 <=I hate these pads lol
-Duralast Shoes: $15
So the rough parts total was $200 (trying to include tax)...everything works great, but I absolutely hate these brake pads. They have great bite, but they leave an incredible amount of dust. I'm going to try the Hawk pads next time around B)
-Jordan
 

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You want to upgrade your brakes by overpaying for rotors and drums you don't need and using run of the mill pads on stock units? Thats like upgrading your computer for better performance by using the Chuck Norris mouse pad instead of the Minnie Mouse mouse pad.

If you really want an upgrade, get rear disk. Run good pads. rotors will do nothing for you. Also, NO combination is going to last 75K-100K miles. You will need pads before then.
 

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Would the 11.6" brakes fit with his wheels?
FWIW, I did a brake job recently and here is about how it was priced:
-2 new Wearever brake rotors: $60
-2 new brake drums (I think I got them at O'Reiley's): $70
-Hardware kit for drum brakes: $10
-Wearever Gold Semi-Metallic brake pads: $35 <=I hate these pads lol
-Duralast Shoes: $15
So the rough parts total was $200 (trying to include tax)...everything works great, but I absolutely hate these brake pads. They have great bite, but they leave an incredible amount of dust. I'm going to try the Hawk pads next time around B)
-Jordan
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I had those stupid Wearever Gold pads for almost 3500 miles. I somehow ended up walking out with those things when I originally went in for ceramics. Worst. Pads. Ever.

They stop just fine, but they're idiculously dusty like you said, and mine were spectacularly noisy. They were the only pads I've had on either Taurus that ever squealed...I'm back on Duralast Gold ceramics and they're just fine for the same money - stop well, virtually no dust, and silent.

I've had Duralast shoes on the back for almost 50k and they're just fine too.
 

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If you really want an upgrade, get rear disk. Run good pads. rotors will do nothing for you.
[/b]
I agree, a rear drum/disk swap is probably the best upgrade you can do besides getting new pads. One thing you are trying to do is prevent heat build-up. Heat ruins any brake system. The only reason people use slotted or cross drilled rotors is for two reasons, 1) looks and 2) better heat dissipation. Companies like Brembo and Baer make great products, but not for a Taurus, it's over kill.

Pads that bite more will leave more residue on your wheels, where harder pads might last longer and leave less residue, but will not brake as well.

I would check a wrecking yard some parts for a rear disk setup and get the rest new.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
((((In advance, sorry for the length))))
Thank you so much everyone for your replies. Your advice has been well considered. I guess I should clarify that I don't really want to "upgrade" the brakes-- meaning put on bigger discs and swap the drums. I have no real complaints with the stuff that is up there now and I think it will perform just fine for the conditions I will be in. Plus I think the swap is a little too intensive for my tastes right now and I like to keep things simple for my daily driver. My thing is that I just want to get the highest quality hardware up there so that I don't have to worry about replacing or having shoddy quality parts in the time I need it most… like going down a mountain. I also don’t want to have to replace (if possible) for the rest of the life of the car.

---This was my thinking---
On the rotors/drums:
I was originally turned on to the Brembo Slotted rotors when I realized I'd have to replace my brakes soon but 100% of the other posts up here and elsewhere discouraged that and most on those forums just said to go with the OEM replacement Brembos rather than slotted. So I was under some impression that the quality was noticeably higher with the Brembos than the normal Autozone rotors.

I am all about high quality stuff for my car (synthetic everything), so I figured paying a $192 for that wasn't too bad considering that similar (Duralast) parts at Autozone would tally to over $200. Also, buying through Autozone, it would be $200 for just 2 Brembo front Rotors. I do see I can get a Wearever package from Advance for just over $150, so I can see the point that it may not be worth paying an extra $40 for something I may not notice.

The one thing that is still turning me toward paying more is that my original drums have slightly warped over time and I have a 'feeling' that the Brembo hardware may resist warping better and may give me longer lasting quality... plus with my "high quality" disposition it may give me more piece of mind. In my mind the fact that I do all of the maintenance myself and don't pay labor charges-- I think gives me the excuse to spend a little more for higher quality so that I don't have to do as much maintenance in the future. That's just my thinking though.

On the Pads/Shoes:
I was definitely looking at the Hawk Ceramics and Greenstuff pads… but I looked at the Ceramic Duralast with the Lifetime warranty for about the same price, and that is why I was leaning toward them. They offer the same benefits like low dust and low noise… but maybe at the price of performance? I figure any ceramic is going to perform better than what I have now. I also like the idea of being able to bring the pads back to Autozone if I have any problems in the future… even 5 or more years down the road. I like the idea of not necessarily “needing” to replace them with the lifetime warranty provided. But will I really get that much more performance out of Hawk’s or Greenstuff’s over Duralast’s with a LLT warranty? (Insert your opinion here please). How long will the Hawk pads last?

Does my thinking ^^up there^^ match my wants/needs out of brakes or is there still a better route I can take?

Again, I really appreciate everyone’s opinions and already your different perspectives have helped me in evaluating this hard decision for me. :thumb:
 

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Drums warping? That's a new one by me.

The Hawk pads are going to work great for probably 30k miles. They're probably going to be a bit louder than stock, and will likely dust more.

If I were you, I'd go with Wagner Thermoquiet pads. I ran them twice on my old Sable, and they were great. My PFCs stop a whole hell of a lot better, but they dust much more, and they're louder.

Whatever you end up doing, check out the rotor seasoning and pad bedding procedure that I posted in the Wiki. That will really help as far as prolonging the life of your rotors and pads, and increasing your stopping ability.

JR
 

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Drums warping? That's a new one by me.

The Hawk pads are going to work great for probably 30k miles. They're probably going to be a bit louder than stock, and will likely dust more.

If I were you, I'd go with Wagner Thermoquiet pads. I ran them twice on my old Sable, and they were great. My PFCs stop a whole hell of a lot better, but they dust much more, and they're louder.

Whatever you end up doing, check out the rotor seasoning and pad bedding procedure that I posted in the Wiki. That will really help as far as prolonging the life of your rotors and pads, and increasing your stopping ability.

JR
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Word on the seasoning and bedding. Helps a whole ton.
I still say get cheap rotors/drums. Mine have held up great, and I'm not easy on the breaks by any means.
Really the only thing you're paying for is the "Brembo" on the box.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Drums warping? That's a new one by me.
[/b]
Sorry I was typing one thing and meant another.. I meant discs. I am all over the seasoning and bedding though! I saw that and it looks like a good write-up.
 

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Discs very, very, very rarely warped. I've typed about this ad nauseam, and I'm not getting deep into it, but discs on a passenger car don't warp. What you will get are high spots from cheap ass pads, as the pad material leaves deposits. A few good 100-0 stops with hot brakes will clean that right up.

Anyway, this is why we recommend good pads over good rotors.

JR
 

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a front brake upgrade is very easy on your car... in fact its just like doing a brake job, nothing different.......

take off all your old stuff

remove caliper, remove caliper bracket, remove pads, remove rotor

now to put on the 99SHO 11.6 brake upgrade

get 99 SHO Rotors, put those back on
get 99 SHO pads, these are bigger
then you need 99 SHO caliper brackets, this will be the only part you really change on the car....

to get the rotor off you obviously unbolted the original caliper bracket, so instead of putting it back on, you put on the SHO bracket..... then the SHO pads, and just bolt your caliper up to it.....


EASY

oh yeah, some fools might tell you not to upgrade the fronts with your drum setup, I say thats not needed..... I recently did a brake job on a 2001 SLO Taurus, which uses the same brake setup up front as the 99 SHO, we use Wagner Thermoquiets at work..... that car had the 11.6 rotors and drums in the rear.... stopped totally different then my 93 SHO with discs all around...... makes my cars brakes look very inadequate
 

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don't bother with the brembos. cheapest chinesest rotors work great. put the money you save towards a torque wrench. and retorque your rims after every service. even if just your oil was changed, manny places check your brake pads, to see if they can sell you a brake job.
 

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a front brake upgrade is very easy on your car... in fact its just like doing a brake job, nothing different.......

take off all your old stuff

remove caliper, remove caliper bracket, remove pads, remove rotor

now to put on the 99SHO 11.6 brake upgrade

get 99 SHO Rotors, put those back on
get 99 SHO pads, these are bigger
then you need 99 SHO caliper brackets, this will be the only part you really change on the car....[/b]
The parts are the same 96-99 SHO, 2001-2007 SLO. This includes rotors, pads, and the brackets. The calipers are the same 96-07 SLO and SHO.
The brackets have "FN74" cast into them
The pads end in "598" - the pads ending in "601" are for the SLO and are too small.
 

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Another thing to keep in mind with Drums is they are inheritly harder to dial in and don't "show" when they aren't working correctly. When replacing the drum be sure to clean the inner components with some brake cleaner (and a bucket underneath). Many times the components get sticky and this can lead to improper pad wear on your front brakes and/or poor stopping performance. I actually cracked my front Baer rotors due to bad Drums. I quickly rectified that with rear disks... ;)

A good way to check if your drums are properly adjusted is with the tire off the ground give the wheel a light spin. Just enough so that it could spin a little more than once. If the wheel naturally only spins one full rotation then you should be good. If it wants to keep spinning you need to adjust the shoes out a bit.

I second a good pair of Pads is the best. Autozone Gold's are typically good, but not the "best". They work good for our cars and only have to be purchased once as they have a "lifetime" gaurantee of replacement. For my normal breaks I am using Raybestos Ceramic Gold's and they do work better than any of the Autozone ones I have used. I use Yellow Stuff pads for track.

There are advantages for using better rotors, but keep in mind that most people are referring to "Daily Driver". Most people (even hard break'ers) don't need fancy rotors. Though there is one advantage to fancy rotors that a daily driver might desire. "Most" aftermarket "Name Brand" rotors have a protective coating which protects the metal from water and other corrosions. This can help to keep them working better and looking good all year round... ;)
 

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a front brake upgrade is very easy on your car... in fact its just like doing a brake job, nothing different.......

take off all your old stuff

remove caliper, remove caliper bracket, remove pads, remove rotor

now to put on the 99SHO 11.6 brake upgrade

get 99 SHO Rotors, put those back on
get 99 SHO pads, these are bigger
then you need 99 SHO caliper brackets, this will be the only part you really change on the car....

to get the rotor off you obviously unbolted the original caliper bracket, so instead of putting it back on, you put on the SHO bracket..... then the SHO pads, and just bolt your caliper up to it.....


EASY

oh yeah, some fools might tell you not to upgrade the fronts with your drum setup, I say thats not needed..... I recently did a brake job on a 2001 SLO Taurus, which uses the same brake setup up front as the 99 SHO, we use Wagner Thermoquiets at work..... that car had the 11.6 rotors and drums in the rear.... stopped totally different then my 93 SHO with discs all around...... makes my cars brakes look very inadequate
[/b]
so what your saying is on gen 3s you only have to get the rotors and brackets to upgrade the fronts
 
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