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I recently bought a 2002 Ford Taurus with 120,000 miles. It had a bad engine miss caused by low compression (40 lbs) on the front head. I first replaced the front head which fixed the # 5 cylinder miss fire. The engine still missed because the # 1 cylinder was 60 lbs. and the # 2 was 120 lbs. I changed the back head and the engine runs fine. I looked at the intake valves and the surface was pitted on all of the valves. The exhaust valves looked good. The head seats were fine. I talked to the local garage and they suspected that E85 had been used by the previous owner. The E85 will increase cylinder temperatures. Is E85 the cause?
 

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E85 burns cooler than gasoline. It has an octane ration of 105 or 107. So, in my opinion and my toying around with e85 for years, and based on a quick google search, no e85 won't damage your car as you describe. My car gets better gas mileage on 30-40% ethanol than it does on 10% ethanol.
 

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The fuel itself burns cooler, but on a non flex fuel car, or car that not is set-up to run on e85, the mix will go SUPER lean. Lean = HOT. It probably detonated to all hell. You'd think that the last owner would have noticed. It wouldn't run even close to normal.
 

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Cool. You just repeated what I said.
 

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Run your car on e85. Not just idling, driving. Take it to redline a few times. I'd love to hear what happens, if you can even get it past 2k rpm.
 

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I'd hate to think of how long it would take to idle out 18 gallons of E85. I still can't find a single reference or piceof actual data that says E85 in a non flex fuel vehicle will cause:
"It had a bad engine miss caused by low compression (40 lbs) on the front head. I first replaced the front head which fixed the # 5 cylinder miss fire. The engine still missed because the # 1 cylinder was 60 lbs. and the # 2 was 120 lbs. I changed the back head and the engine runs fine. I looked at the intake valves and the surface was pitted on all of the valves."
 

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:lurk:

:rofl: :rofl:
 

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QUOTE (2000Sable @ Mar 24 2009, 07:41 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=711943
I'd hate to think of how long it would take to idle out 18 gallons of E85. I still can't find a single reference or piece of actual data that says E85 in a non flex fuel vehicle will cause:
"It had a bad engine miss caused by low compression (40 lbs) on the front head. I first replaced the front head which fixed the # 5 cylinder miss fire. The engine still missed because the # 1 cylinder was 60 lbs. and the # 2 was 120 lbs. I changed the back head and the engine runs fine. I looked at the intake valves and the surface was pitted on all of the valves."[/b]
That's because most people aren't retarded enough to run 100% e85 in a non flex-fuel car.

Notice I said 'most'. Find what happens when you lean out the mix so much that the car misfires and detonates. You may find some interesting, and similar, results.
 

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QUOTE (FFVulcanPowah @ Mar 24 2009, 06:52 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=711949
QUOTE (2000Sable @ Mar 24 2009, 07:41 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=711943
I'd hate to think of how long it would take to idle out 18 gallons of E85. I still can't find a single reference or piece of actual data that says E85 in a non flex fuel vehicle will cause:
"It had a bad engine miss caused by low compression (40 lbs) on the front head. I first replaced the front head which fixed the # 5 cylinder miss fire. The engine still missed because the # 1 cylinder was 60 lbs. and the # 2 was 120 lbs. I changed the back head and the engine runs fine. I looked at the intake valves and the surface was pitted on all of the valves."[/b]
That's because most people aren't retarded enough to run 100% e85 in a non flex-fuel car.

Notice I said 'most'. Find what happens when you lean out the mix so much that the car misfires and detonates. You may find some interesting, and similar, results.
[/b][/quote]

What's the main difference between a car that can run E85 (Flex Fuel) and one that isn't (Flex Fuel) designed to? Just wondering if you could tell us?
 

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Here's a couple:

-Larger injectors
-(sometimes) different compression ratio
-Larger fuel pump
-Sensor to detect ethanol content. I've heard it called a "lambda" sensor before.
-Computer programming to adjust the a/f ratio for ethanol/gas mix.

A car that is designed to run on gasoline only will NOT adjust the a/f ratio, wont pump more fuel in, and will encounter a lean condition if e85 is run in the car.
 

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That lean condition might fry an O2 sensor but it won't destroy the engine as described. This isn't racing fuel or nitrous we're talking about.
 

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Most people who experiment with ethanol experience detonation/pre-ignition/knock at e50 (50%), or less. Constant detonation from an e85 (85%) mix CAN cause engine damage as described. You get it lean enough, and you'll start burning off pieces of the spark plugs. I bet those little pieces would cause some neat pitting on a piston or valve.

But hey, you seem pretty confident that e85 wouldn't seriously f-up an engine/car that's not set up for it. Give it a try. You seem like the time that's so dead-set in their ways to actually attempt something that...adventurous.
 

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Here's the math -

Gasoline runs at roughly 14.7 parts of air to one part of fuel.

Alcohol runs at 9 parts of air to one part alcohol. E85 means the fuel is 85% alcohol. This is NOT an insignificant variance from 100% gasoline.

Big word - stoichiometric balance. If you take a computer program which is designed to maintain a 14.7:1 balance and use a fuel designed to run at 9:1 balance you will be under fueled significantly.
When you run under fueled, you run lean. When you run lean, you run hot. You WILL wreck your mill with the wrong fuel.
Also, alcohol does not show up on an O2 sensor the same as gasoline hydrocarbons do, furthering the poor CPU's confusion.

Go ahead, pull the engine apart. I would expect to see all the ring landings will be rounded from overheating.
 

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I'll bet you 10 dollars Sable guy disputes this.
 

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QUOTE (FFVulcanPowah @ Mar 24 2009, 07:52 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=711973
I'll bet you 10 dollars Sable guy disputes this.[/b]
Nope. E85 destroys non-flex fuel cars. I'm wrong. The junk yards are full of E85 destroyed cars and the Internet is abuzz with tales of woe caused by putting E85 in a non flex fuel vehicle.

Excuse me I have to go add an ounce and a half of acetone to my fuel tank and 12 ounces of sea foam to put in my crank case.
 
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