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Looking For Leakers In Ford's Duratec 3.0L Engines


Due to changes in the Duratec block casting around mid-year 1999, using the wrong head gasket may result in leaks. Text below is copy/paste from article above.



QUOTE
Ford Duratec engines manufactured for the 1999 model year vehicle applications may have a greater tendency to leak.


If you have ever experienced the joy of doing a plumbing project you learn very quickly about how the proper amount of heat in the right place will literally leach the solder into the joint to seal the copper pipe properly – or not. It becomes obvious where you failed to do so once you open the main water valve and you suddenly realize you have a leak.
That is exactly what can happen with the 3.0L DOHC Duratec Ford engines. In particular, those engines manufactured for the 1999 model year vehicle applications may have a greater tendency to leak.

It seems that engines built prior to 6/15/1999 used one head gasket and cylinder head/block combination and after that date used another. All of the casting numbers and details will be coming in an article later this year but for right now we are going to give you the basic information and images to keep you from having a leaker.

There are three different areas which clearly identify which head gasket is which and a small change was made to the coolant port area between cylinders No. 2 and No. 4 on the right bank.

If the wrong style head gasket is used you will have a coolant leak to the exterior of the engine, which on initial start up changes your shoulder posture from bold and robust to hunched over and distraught, usually with a small moan connected to it. So before that happens let me give you that "one thing" you need to know: if you have an F5 or F7 block use the early gasket; if it is an XW block use the later gasket.

If you look at the pictures you can see why. First compare the head gaskets early and late (Figure 1), noticing the three different color boxes on both gaskets, and corresponding expanded views with the same color borders (Figures 2, 3 and 4). All the pictures show the early view on the top and late view on the bottom. Then look at the expanded view of the cylinder head (Figure 5) and you can see the minor difference in the castings.

Put the wrong gasket on the wrong head and you'll have your leaker.[/b]
 

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QUOTE (spridget @ May 22 2010, 01:48 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=806013
Looking For Leakers In Ford's Duratec 3.0L Engines


Due to changes in the Duratec block casting around mid-year 1999, using the wrong head gasket may result in leaks. Text below is copy/paste from article above.



QUOTE
Ford Duratec engines manufactured for the 1999 model year vehicle applications may have a greater tendency to leak.


If you have ever experienced the joy of doing a plumbing project you learn very quickly about how the proper amount of heat in the right place will literally leach the solder into the joint to seal the copper pipe properly – or not. It becomes obvious where you failed to do so once you open the main water valve and you suddenly realize you have a leak.
That is exactly what can happen with the 3.0L DOHC Duratec Ford engines. In particular, those engines manufactured for the 1999 model year vehicle applications may have a greater tendency to leak.

It seems that engines built prior to 6/15/1999 used one head gasket and cylinder head/block combination and after that date used another. All of the casting numbers and details will be coming in an article later this year but for right now we are going to give you the basic information and images to keep you from having a leaker.

There are three different areas which clearly identify which head gasket is which and a small change was made to the coolant port area between cylinders No. 2 and No. 4 on the right bank.

If the wrong style head gasket is used you will have a coolant leak to the exterior of the engine, which on initial start up changes your shoulder posture from bold and robust to hunched over and distraught, usually with a small moan connected to it. So before that happens let me give you that "one thing" you need to know: if you have an F5 or F7 block use the early gasket; if it is an XW block use the later gasket.

If you look at the pictures you can see why. First compare the head gaskets early and late (Figure 1), noticing the three different color boxes on both gaskets, and corresponding expanded views with the same color borders (Figures 2, 3 and 4). All the pictures show the early view on the top and late view on the bottom. Then look at the expanded view of the cylinder head (Figure 5) and you can see the minor difference in the castings.

Put the wrong gasket on the wrong head and you'll have your leaker.[/b]
[/b][/quote]


Good Information for us Duratec owners.

The article does not say, but I was curious what this change means to us owners of duratec engines.
I mean the change could have been made for the benefit of the casting supplier or to decrease Ford Warranty costs due to head gaskets failures ( I have no knowledge of Duratec head gaskets failures), to name a few or for other reasons.

So if anyone knows what precipated this change please speak up.

I am sensitive to this issue because I just had my mechanic replace a head gasket failure on my wife pos
GM minivan.


k8crd
Michigan
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There were minor changes to allow for VVT which was available on some models. Coolant and oil ports were added or enlarged.
 

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VVT on a taurus?? really? i need to find that diamond in the rough...
 

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QUOTE (Jivvity @ May 23 2010, 02:51 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=806304
VVT on a taurus?? really? i need to find that diamond in the rough...[/b]
The Duratec 3L block is used in many different vehicles. The block is indentical in each one. Heads, oil pans, front covers, intakes, and exhaust system are different.

Jaguar X-Type (w/ VVT)
Jaguar S-Type (w/ VVT)
Lincoln LS V6 (w/ VVT)
Ford Escape V6 (w/o VVT)
Ford Taurus (w/o VVT)
Ford Five Hundred (w/o VVT)
Mercury Sable (w/o VVT)


edit - I believe the 3L Duratec block in the Five Hundred has different casting on the back side for the CVT bellhousing. I've never seen one to verify.
 
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