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I'm starting a new topic with a question I posted on my other thread about transmission flushes based on some info I recently found.

Does a 1999 Taurus (and the other Generations of Tauruses) have a drain plug on the torque converter for draining the trans fluid?

I just came across the following info doing a Scroogle search and it sounds very promising. I'll post it and bold the most interesting part which is toward the middle:

http://autotechrepair.suite101.com/article...ission_flushing

Transmission Flushing
Car Repair Advice on When and How to Flush Your Transmission

© Vincent Ciulla

Jan 3, 2008 Auto repair advice from expert Vincent Ciulla. Your questions answered about transmission flushing.


Read more: "Transmission Flushing: Car Repair Advice on When and How to Flush Your Transmission" - http://autotechrepair.suite101.com/article...g#ixzz09ymsEZMZ


This weekly Q&A session answers your questions about cars and trucks. This week explores transmission services and flushing.

QUESTION: Transmission Flushing

I noticed you didn't advise on flushing the transmission. We flush 8 hours a day and have never had a problem. Snap-On only puts in the same amount of pressure that the transmission puts out. Drop the pan, clean it and add a new filter. Snap-On guarantees its pump not to damage or they will pay for repairs.

Had Ford Explorers going 250,000 miles without a problem and are still going right now. Love your website.


ANSWER:

The Snap-On machine is not a flush machine; it is a fluid exchanger. All it does is push out the old fluid. A flush machine uses high pressure and cleaning agents and forces it in the reverse direction of the normal fluid flow.

This is something Ford Motor Company specifically advises against. In big letters in the Ford transmission service manuals it says "Warning: Use only clean automatic transmission fluid. Do not use any supplemental transmission fluid additives, treatments or cleaning agents. The use of these materials affects the operation of the transmission, resulting in internal component failure."

It is not necessary to use a special machine to do the job correctly.

Just drop the pan and pull the drain plug on the torque converter. While it's draining, drop the transmission filter, put in a new one and clean the pan. Put a new gasket on the transmission pan and button it back up. Put the drain plug back into the torque converter and fill up the transmission.

This method will get 95% of the transmission fluid out with wasting time hooking up a machine you don't need. Then you can use the money for that machine on equipment you do need.

The facts are this:

1. The only ones who recommend a transmission, or engine, flush as a maintenance service are the people who make the machines and the people who sell the service.

2. No automotive manufacturer in the world recommends a flush as regular service. If a shop tells you they do; they are outright lying to you.

3. All automotive manufacturers specifically recommend against flushing services. Doing so will void new vehicle warranties.

4. A transmission, or engine, that has been regularly serviced does not need a flush.

5. Flush machine manufacturers specifically advise against flushing "high mileage" vehicles. This loosely phrased warning puts the complete burden of the cost of repairs to components damaged by a flushing service on the shop and leaves them libel free.

So whenever a shop says you need a transmission, or engine, flush; just say no.
 

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To do a full fluid flush, you'll need to use the following procedure:

Disconnect trans line from cooler and put in bucket
Start car, let transmission pump until the fluid get very slow
Turn off car
Drop transmission pan
Change filter
Put transmission pan on with original gasket
Fill with 8-9 quarts of fluid
Start car, keep running until fluid coming out of hose is cherry
Turn off car
Re-connect trans line to cooler
Top up with an additional 4-6 quarts until full

JR
 

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QUOTE (OldWagon @ Mar 17 2009, 07:57 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=709533
QUOTE (godspunk32 @ Mar 17 2009, 06:25 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=709530
Disconnect trans line from cooler and put in bucket[/b]
Which line? Or just disconnect both?
[/b][/quote]
There are two lines coming out of the transmission for cooling. The line that runs up the passenger side of the vehicle is the outlet, the one that runs along the driver's side is the intake for the transmission.

They both run to a metal cooling pipe situated in front of the radiator. There are two pipes up there...one is for the power steering, the other for the transmission. Usually, the transmission cooler is the bottom one, or the one without vanes, though they are sometimes switched.

Disconnect the hose coming out of the cooling pipe, so on the driver's side, and attach a 2' piece of similar hose to the pipe. Put that pipe into the bucket.

JR
 

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Mine is slightly different in that the cooler apparently is integral to the radiator... but no matter, since the rubber hoses are easily accessed at the base of the radiator on the driver's side. They already have worm-gear hose clamps on them, probably from a previous owner's flush. Probably have to remove the underside air dam, also no biggie.

Hope they took it to a Ford dealer, where they use only a fluid transfer system rather than a Firestone/QuikLube tranny-busting power flush.
 
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