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Ok, a little backround first. 2003 Taurus with 3.0 Duratec and 82,000+ on original transmission. Regular maint / fluid & filter changes done to the transmission with a Gen2 SHO trans cooler installed and a cyberdyne 0-300 F digital temp gauge. The SHO cooler is mounted under the front core support and the flow goes from the trans to the radiator cooler, bypassing the stock cooler to the SHO cooler then back to the trans.

Today I took the wagon on its longest trip with the Gen2 SHO cooler and the gauge togeather. It was a 130 mile run @ 70mph with an outside temp average of about 30 F. I got on the highway and set the cruise control @ 70 for the complete trip. Once on the highway the trans warmed right up to 112F and stayed steady for most of the trip. What was interesting to watch was on up and down hill sections you could actually watch the temp go up and down by as much as 2 degrees plus on the up hills and minus on the down hills. The engine temp stayed normal the whole trip with pleanty of heat.

It will be interesting to see how much this will cool come summertime. If anyone is thinking of installing a cooler and temp gauge, I would highly recomend the digital gauge. You would never see this temp change with an analog gauge.
 

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Sounds like your system is working well. I'm working on my temperature switch for the fan. With temps in the 40's the fan constantly on causes the trans to not go to OD and lockup for too long(IMO). Had some issues attaching it to the cooler line, but I think I have it resolved. I'll post pic's when I'm sure about how it will attach.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I made half of the same trip today. The temp was in the 40's today and the trans ran almost 10F hotter, in the 120F range. I am still looking into some changes for this summer. I'll keep everyone informed on the plans.
 

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Hey DLC, apparently you mean using an electronic guage. Analog electronic guages will show the difference, however the ones that are not analog (with the capillary tubes.. and noticeably cheaper) Take time to register the differences. This is why I always recommend that people add a transmission cooler to their vehicles.

Also.. Can someone ban the Ad-Bot already??
 

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I finished installing my switch. It's made of a disc thermostat(150 deg F) attached to an aluminum adapter which saddles the cooler line. It is held together with 2 epoxys and sealed with liquid electrical tape. There's thermal grease between the adapter and the switch. I just need to wire it in and I'll be good to go.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey DLC, apparently you mean using an electronic guage. Analog electronic guages will show the difference, however the ones that are not analog (with the capillary tubes.. and noticeably cheaper) Take time to register the differences. This is why I always recommend that people add a transmission cooler to their vehicles.

Also.. Can someone ban the Ad-Bot already??
I have a DIGITAL read out gauge with an electric sending unit mounted in the trans. By analog I meant a needle style gauge. The other downfall of a needle gauge is they start at 180F so they would never register in colder weather.
 

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I have a DIGITAL read out gauge with an electric sending unit mounted in the trans. By analog I meant a needle style gauge. The other downfall of a needle gauge is they start at 180F so they would never register in colder weather.
I've found electronic analogue "needle" gauges adjust almost instantaneously. The Trans temp gauges I've seen start at 100 degrees and go to 250 degrees. So its perfectly in the temperature range that the tranny should be in. :dunno:

The "mechanical" analogue gauges are the ones with capillary tubes and take time to register changes in temperature.
 

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Trans temp switch done!

My trans temp switch setup works. The fan comes on when the trans temp gets to 160F, and cuts out when it gets down to 140F. That should be the end of thinking about trans temps. Now on to the CPS and rear valve cover gasket.B)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've found electronic analogue "needle" gauges adjust almost instantaneously. The Trans temp gauges I've seen start at 100 degrees and go to 250 degrees. So its perfectly in the temperature range that the tranny should be in. :dunno:

The "mechanical" analogue gauges are the ones with capillary tubes and take time to register changes in temperature.
I agree most "needle" gauges span 100 to 250 degrees. While this is a good range for a transmission, I wanted to have as wide a range as possible. When driving on the freeway and the gauge drops down to 108 degrees, I dont have to sit there and try to figure out where the needle is pointing, my gauge reads 108 in bright red numbers, no needle pointing at smaller lines to count. If my trans temp moves 1 degree, I know it right away, I dont have to guess. My cyberdyne gauge also has a memory recall feature that at anytime while driving I can push the button and know the high and low temps for that session. All questions are answered just by looking at the gauge. I agree, if a gauge is big enough and right infront of you, a needle gauge is good enough. When it is mounted in a secondary location, away from the windshield line of sight, I want bright numbers to quickly see and get back to driving. The same information but in a quicker and safer function.
 

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Whether you go with an analog electronic or digital electronic gauge, it is mostly personal taste. (I don't like the mechanical capillary ones either because they can spring a leak and then what are you going to do?)

Personally, I like having the AutoMeter Z-series gauges triple-mounted on my a-pillar. The digital instrument cluster is cool, but actual needles on a gauge do look cool too!

Since yours is in the console, you probably want to check it with a quick glance instead of having to actually read it while driving. (Makes sense!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Whether you go with an analog electronic or digital electronic gauge, it is mostly personal taste. (I don't like the mechanical capillary ones either because they can spring a leak and then what are you going to do?)

Personally, I like having the AutoMeter Z-series gauges triple-mounted on my a-pillar. The digital instrument cluster is cool, but actual needles on a gauge do look cool too!

Since yours is in the console, you probably want to check it with a quick glance instead of having to actually read it while driving. (Makes sense!)
I agree on both counts for most gauges except for a temp gauge (water, oil, trans or any other temp you may want) that the capillary type gauge is not accurate for that. You loose temp the farther away you have to run the fluid since it is not a circulating system. For temp I feel the electrical sending unit is a better gauge, needle or digital read out.

Depending on where the gauge is mounted and the size of the gauge is how I would pick what style. I grew up working on racecars and to mount a small gauge below dash level is asking for trouble. You have to take your eyes away from the forward view and focus on the gauge longer than you should. If you notice, this is done but all gauges point up at normal range for a quick glance, but its not very accurate.
With digital read out in a small gauge, its just a guick glance. Mounting a 2 5/8 inch gauge in dash or above, needle gauges are great. With a full sweep trans gauge, that would be sweet. I mounted a 2 1/16 gauge at knee level in the console, thats just asking for trouble at anytime the car is moving.

BTW, sorry if I sound bossy or pushy with my opinions. Its just one of my biggest b!thce$ when people mount things in cars that they have to take their eyes off the road to use.
 

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I agree on both counts for most gauges except for a temp gauge (water, oil, trans or any other temp you may want) that the capillary type gauge is not accurate for that. You loose temp the farther away you have to run the fluid since it is not a circulating system. For temp I feel the electrical sending unit is a better gauge, needle or digital read out.
I agree that electronic is more accurate, but the mechanical gauge does not work as you describe. The sensing element has a fluid inside which expands with heat and increases pressure. The capillary tube carries the pressure to the gauge. The gauge deflects due to the changing pressure. They can be very accurate, but generally automotive gauges are not that high quality(cheap). It is much easier to make an accurate electronic one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I agree that electronic is more accurate, but the mechanical gauge does not work as you describe. The sensing element has a fluid inside which expands with heat and increases pressure. The capillary tube carries the pressure to the gauge. The gauge deflects due to the changing pressure. They can be very accurate, but generally automotive gauges are not that high quality(cheap). It is much easier to make an accurate electronic one.
AHHHHHHH, you are right, I was thinking like an oil pressure gauge. I completely forgot about the sending unit being sealed for the temp gauges.
 

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Ok, a little backround first. 2003 Taurus with 3.0 Duratec and 82,000+ on original transmission. Regular maint / fluid & filter changes done to the transmission with a Gen2 SHO trans cooler installed and a cyberdyne 0-300 F digital temp gauge.
Cyberdyne??? Don't they invent Skynet a few years from now? I seen the movie...
 

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