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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I'm still dealing with the crapped out cooling system on my '99 Vulcan. I flushed the engine once, and the core twice in the past 6 months. Flushing the engine did nothing, and after every core flush, there was amazing heat! (For 2-3 days..:angry:)

This car is important. I use for long trips every week, and I NEED heat. I don't have time or money to be getting another car. The Mystique is my mom's car. She won't trade with me.:(

Anyways to the point now. After reading the Brown Coolant TSB .pdf, I realized that I wasn't using the right product or procedure. First of all, I need some sort of iron neutralizer. They say to use F8AZ-19A503-AA, Ford Neutral pH Iron Cleaner. The problem is, its not manufactured anymore. There was a substitute (I Think) that I found, and it was Motorcraft VC-9. It is supposed to be an iron cleaner too, but i'm wondering if it is only for diesels? :confused: Well that product is discontinued too.

For the procedure. The cleaner is supposed to be poured into the heater return hose that connects to the water pump, and the rest of the system filled with water. After it has rached operating temps and sat for 30 some odd minutes, disconnect the bottle overflow and attach a section of hose to run over the fender. Disconnect the hose from the water pump, and plug the opening of the pump. Fit a garden hose to the heater return hose, and flush the system for 5 minutes with the water draining out the overflow hose and the petcock.

Hopefully that procedure is right, and with the right chemical, it will solve my problem. Would anybody happen to know of any other substitutes for the products I mentioned? I don't think Prestone Radiator Cleaner would work, because it doesn't mention anything about the neutralization of Iron. Something alot stronger would be needed.

Your input is greatly appreciated. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for your responses. i will probably get the motorcraft vc9 product.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I found the Motorcraft CV9 on amazon in the link below 25 bucks. i dont see why it would matter if it was a diesel considering its just the coolant system. but i could be wrong on that. The procedure you mentioned sounds right to me.


Amazon.com: Motorcraft VC9 CLEANER OXIDATI: Automotive
Well, unfortunately, these guys don't ship to Canada.:( I guess i'll keep scouting around for some sort of iron cleaner. I'll also keep in mind the Iron Out that Shelia was talking about. But i'm wondering if its safe for engines..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well I spoke to one of the guys from Ford.com, and they said that both the cleaners mentioned in my first post were still available. The first one, which is the neutral ph iron cleaner (F8AZ-19A503-AA) is still indeed available through Ford. Here's the catch though. When you add the part to your cart, the price is $176 because they are trying to sell you 6 bottles in one quantity. Each bottle would be around $30, which is reasonable.

The Motorcraft VC9 is available in just one bottle, and its $26.50 or something. Probably gonna get that one and order it online or go to my highway-robbery friends at Ford on the west-side of town.
 

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I'll add my 2¢. I have read on this forum that the early Vulcan engines have a cooling design problem. And from what you described on your 1st post it appears you may have this issue.

My suggestion and I know its a real pain-in-the-ass to do but...
flush the heater and engine separately. Why?

If the block contains a large portion of rust and other chunks of garbage you don't want this going into your heater core only to clog it up again. Bypass the heater with a hose of some type. Flush the engine as best as you can if necessary alternate the flush direction.

Flush the heater core last with a garden hose and alternate the direction of flush until it comes out clean.

Reconnect heater core to the original coolant lines.

Refill with Motorcraft antifreeze + distilled water and test.

Other cooling issues to look for.
Bad coolant hoses, cracked or getting brittle.
Coolant leaks of all types (e.g. hoses, radiator, water pump).

Monsoon
 

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I've heard and read that the only rustable metal in the whole cooling system, is the impeller blades of the water pump, so that if you find a coolant or heater core flush purges a fair amount of rust, you should check your water pump's impeller. I also thought I'd read that you can buy water pumps whose impeller isn't made of a rustable material, or you can get a non-rustable impeller by itself and replace the old one, which would seem to eliminate this from happening again, but that sometimes these impellers are more subject to cracking than the rustable type.

Is any of that accurate?
 

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^ Adworden, i have used CLR once as suggested by a few on this and other forums. It worked great cleaning up the core and entire cooling system but soon after i developed a pass. floorboard coolant (core) leak and syrupy mist on the inner windshield signalling the demise of the core. Dunno if the CLR caused this or the core (which had been troublesome and previously treated with stop leak) just gave out due to age and wear and tear. Maybe the CLR merely removed the stop leak. After replacing the core, i read the fine print on the back of the CLR bottle (good timing). Stated not to be used on aluminum, brass or copper. Their info data sheet online said not to be used in automotive cooling systems.... Live and learn. Others claim to have used it successfully. As previously stated, it may have simply removed the old stop leak which was keeping leaks at bay?
 

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^ Adworden, i have used CLR once as suggested by a few on this and other forums. It worked great cleaning up the core and entire cooling system but soon after i developed a pass. floorboard coolant (core) leak and syrupy mist on the inner windshield signalling the demise of the core. Dunno if the CLR caused this or the core (which had been troublesome and previously treated with stop leak) just gave out due to age and wear and tear. Maybe the CLR merely removed the stop leak. After replacing the core, i read the fine print on the back of the CLR bottle (good timing). Stated not to be used on aluminum, brass or copper. Their info data sheet online said not to be used in automotive cooling systems.... Live and learn. Others claim to have used it successfully. As previously stated, it may have simply removed the old stop leak which was keeping leaks at bay?
Wow that is a tough lesson to learn. I was going to use copper plumbing to help cool the tranny fluid but I noticed there is no other system on the car that uses copper for plumbing. And there has to be a reason for this - I never installed copper. I stuck with the traditional transmission rubber hose.

Monsoon
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I revived this thread because I finally got around to doing the procedure as mentioned in the Brown Coolant TSB.

I managed to get the iron cleaner stuff through my Ford dealer, who got it through another dealer. Its very rare now, but cost $50 altogether.

Well, after running the car to operating temps with the solution in, the bypass manifold assembly that connects to the heater core, the metal portions just rusted right through. It was rusted before, but this chemical just eats through rust.

I wasn't paying big bucks to buy another one, so i tore the assembly out and bought some 3/4" Gates premium heater hose, a few clamps, and two 90° heater connectors.

Its fitted up now with no bypass. Is this a bad idea? To me, the concept of using a bypass is completely unnecessary, considering that the cooling system is operating correctly. (which it should after this solution has been through.)

We drove the car today for 2 hours total and didn't notice anything out of the ordinary.

Pics are below.

Thanks!
 

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The bypass assembly was a dealer-installed stopgap measure that Ford said would fix the coolant problem. Obviously it never worked, so you're fine without it.
 

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Well, you just increased the back pressure on the water pump (restricted flow). That leads to less flow in the engine block. Don't know how much "less".
Is that good? I would say no... But the only way to find is drive it when outside temperatures are over 90F, in stop and go traffic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
It only gets 90F+ here in like mid-july. Now its getting cooler out, so hopefully i wont have a problem. The temp gauge has never moved passed middle that i can remember. That was even with the brown corroded coolant still in place.
Now maybe the damn thing will heat!
 

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I'm not a mechanic, but based on my experience with my '97 Taurus GL wagon (198.5 k miles now), I would never recommend removal of the bypass hose on a Taurus of this vintage. The cooling systems on these cars will forever shed rust particles large enough to eventually plug your heater core, and without the bypass hose to ensure circulation you're asking for trouble.
 
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