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I've searched and have seen that there is a coolant bypass kit out there. I've seen this done on other cars. I was wondering how this would effect fuel economy.
 

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I would love to be able to take credit for the following but this was a post by Doctor Wicked i found at Mazda6club.com. And as we all know the Mazda 6 uses a beefier version of the Duratec.

This is why it is a bad idea to bypass your throttle body coolant line:

First, we need to make some assumptions. The first set of these assumptions deals with the operating condition of the engine. Let’s assume that we are running the engine at full throttle at 4,000 RPM. We have a 3.0L engine that is efficient and has about an 85% volumetric efficiency. Our effective engine volume is 0.85*3.0L or 2.55L. Since we have a four stroke motor, we are pulling in 2.55L of air 2000 times a minute. Therefore we are ingesting 3.00 cubic feet of air per second, after unit conversions. Our throttle body’s inside diameter is 2.5 inches (D) and its total length is 2 inches (L).

The second set of assumptions deals with the air and coolant flowing through our throttle body. Let’s assume that we are pulling in air from outside the engine bay on a warm day. Our intake air is 80 degrees, Fahrenheit. At 80F and 1 atmosphere, air has the following properties:

Density (p): 0.0735 lbm/ft^3
Thermal conductivity (k): 0.01516 BTU/hr*ft*F
Kinematic Viscosity (v): 16.88*(10^-5) ft^2/s
Specific heat (Cp): 0.24 BTU/lbm*F
Prandtl Number (Pr): 0.708 Unitless

Let us also assume that our coolant is 280F and that our throttle body is not cooled significantly by the incoming air. That is, the surface temperature of the inside of the throttle body is always 280F.

Now we will figure out how much and how fast the air is entering the engine. Through simple calculations, knowing the throttle body dimensions and volumetric flow rate and the density of the air, we can find out the mass flow rate and velocity of the air entering the engine. These values are found to be 794 lbm/hr (m) and 88 ft/s (V).

We now need to know if the flow of the air is turbulent or laminar. This will allow us to determine what appropriate equations to use later. First, we need to find the Reynolds Number (a unitless number that allows one to know if the flow is turbulent or not). This is found by the equation:

Re = V*D/v

We find our Reynolds Number to be 110,000. This is definitely turbulent flow! (Anything over 10,000 is defined as fully turbulent flow)

We need to find our entry length, or the length of tubing needed for the flow to become fully turbulent. This value is defined as Lh = 10*D. This value is found to be 2.08 ft. This is acceptable, since there is, most likely, two feet of piping between the throttle body and the air filter.

Since our entry length is less than our actual piping length, we can use Dittus-Boulter equation to determine the Nusselt Number (Nu):. (Sorry about all of this name dropping)

Nu = 0.023*Re^.8*Pr^.4 = h*D/k

We find our Nusselt Number to be 214. The ‘h’ value above is the average heat transfer coefficient. Now, we can actually find the temperature of the air coming out of our throttle body. Solving for h in the above equation yields h equal to 15.58 BTU/hr*ft^2*F.

By using Newton’s law of cooling, where the rate of heat transfer (Q) is determined to be:

Q=h*(area of heat transfer)*(Surface temperature-Medium Temperature)

By using differential equations, natural logs and some other hocus pocus, we get the following equation:

Texit=Tsurface-(Tsurface-Tinlet)*exp(-h*A/m*Cp)

Finally, by using the above equation, the outlet temperature can be determined to be 81.3 degrees Fahrenheit.

Now, using the SAE J1349 correction factor, you lose ~1% of your total power for each 10 degree increase in inlet air temperature. With this 1.3 degree increase, due to the throttle body coolant, you are losing 0.13% of your power. Or, on a 200hp car, you are losing 0.26hp. By overriding the coolant flowing through your throttle body, you are risking having your throttle body freeze open in cold weather (the whole purpose of running coolant through the throttle body in the first place). Hope this clears up any confusion.
I know that was a lot of math (eww) but hope that helps.
 

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Yeah, I was like WOW when I found that explanation of it. Usually you find the "Just don't do it" kind of answers but was nice to find one where someone took the time to explain (thoroughly at that) why it isn't a good idea to do it.
 

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In this case the "Just don't do it!" answer would have been fine!

Sooooo much math! But better someone else than me.

Still, it was interesting, even if I just nodded like I understood from time to time.

 

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Believe me, when I was in my heat transfer class, where we do those equations, I was doing alot of that head nodding, too. Except It was primarily with my eyes closing.
 

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Whatever. I don't even think our cars have a coolant passage in the TB, do they? Even if they did, I don't think I'm running any risk of having my TB freeze in south florida. :rolleyes: I'll take that 1/4 hp, thank you.
 

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For those that live in the sunbelt i would think that this would be an ok Mod, but living in Indiana myself with or occasionally nasty winters i'm not chancing it for 1/4 HP.

I'll check my Duratec when i get home if no one has posted that they know for sure if this is even possible.
 

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I really wouldnt bypass the coolant for your intake. Remember that stuff isnt just there to keep your car from freezing over in the winter, its also there to remove heat from areas. Especially when you consider how hot it gets inside your engine bay. Then again I guess you could get really tricky and wire an electric pump and a secondary radiator specifically to cool your intake, but why bother. More than likely common sense says that your intake is gonna be about the same ambient temperature as the engine it is connected to, so having coolant flowing through it when it is hot is gonna keep it cooler. Well I better not say any more before someone brings up the idea of an intercooler. Oh well just make sure that if you bypass it you dont do it in a way that will make it hard to reconnect if you reconsider later
 

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why worry about bypassing a coolant line thats not there????

first you should research if you have what your trying to mod. Its like trying to clean the secondaries on a vulcan.

If you have a gen 3 sho...you have a coolant passage in the TB otherwise, you dont.

Brad
 

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There is no reason not to do it if you have the TB heater setup. Why add any heat? And the above equations, though extremely informative, do not take into account when the engine is not using a lot of air.

Sure at WOT there is an insignificant amount of heating, but at closed throttle there is a considerable amount of heating which gets transfered into the intake.
 
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