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So now that summer seems to finally be here, im running into the same engine heat problems i had last year. I have a 160 degree thermostat that i know works because when its cool outside at night or early morning the car runs very cool (just above the "L" on normal). When the sun comes up and the temp is around 75 the car will get much hotter. The temp of the engine will raise slowly but surly up to and past mid range. the car will turn on the low speed fan and the temp will keep raising untill the high speed fan turns on and then the car will start to cool. With these seemingly great temp fluctuations im concerned that i could warp the heads and create a leak. I plan to buy a new radiator and i think im gonna change the water pump. Im curious, has anybody found a water pump that moves more water than typical? I was also thinking about trying to install a smaller pulley on the water pump to drive it faster at normal engine RPMs. Has anybody done this? BTW GEN2 3.8
 

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I'm almost willing to bet that there is dirt/mud/bugs plugging up the fins of your radiator. You can't actually see the radiator because what you see from the front of the car is the condenser coil for the A/C. Before you start throwing all those parts at a car with a perfectly fine radiator system I'd check that first. Get a water hose with a GOOD sprayer attachment on it (NOT a pressure washer, it will bend the fins) and start spraying it through the condenser and see what comes out. If you see a bunch of nasty, keep it up until the water comes clear. If not, I would get a bottle of radiator flush and try that before I'd replace a thing. The stock water pump is perfectly adequate for these motors. I NEVER EVER had a problem with any of the Taurus's I've delt with over the years overheating unless there was something causing it. The other possibility you have with that 3.8 is that one or both of your head gaskets have blown and that will cause overheating. But you'd notice some water loss if that were the case. Let me know what you find.
 

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I know the radiator is clean because i put it in last fall because the old one is leaking, however it is used so im not sure if maybe its plugged. The condenser is also clean because, when i put the radiator in i took an air hose and blew air through the condenser to clean it out but even at the time it wasn't really dirty. The head gaskets seem to be fine as i lose no water from the system since i replaced the radiator. The coolant is fresh as well from last winter when i did a drain and fill to get the mix right for our harsh winters. Im thinkin that either the radiator has a blockage somewhere inside of it, or that the water pump is just wore down and cant move as much water as it should.


QUOTE (MrBooMY @ Jun 12 2009, 05:02 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=731877
I'm almost willing to bet that there is dirt/mud/bugs plugging up the fins of your radiator. You can't actually see the radiator because what you see from the front of the car is the condenser coil for the A/C. Before you start throwing all those parts at a car with a perfectly fine radiator system I'd check that first. Get a water hose with a GOOD sprayer attachment on it (NOT a pressure washer, it will bend the fins) and start spraying it through the condenser and see what comes out. If you see a bunch of nasty, keep it up until the water comes clear. If not, I would get a bottle of radiator flush and try that before I'd replace a thing. The stock water pump is perfectly adequate for these motors. I NEVER EVER had a problem with any of the Taurus's I've delt with over the years overheating unless there was something causing it. The other possibility you have with that 3.8 is that one or both of your head gaskets have blown and that will cause overheating. But you'd notice some water loss if that were the case. Let me know what you find.[/b]
 

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im having same problem, i just got overheated last month and i just did drain and refill the system last 6 months and did it again day after the overheat. and now notice after i rev (4k rpm) appear small bubles on the resevoir (just like there is some soap on it) and notice some slight coolant lost about 1/4 liter per week. is this an head gasket problem?
 

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Well for that issue i would park the car on dry pavement, or put some cardboard under it and run the car till it gets to normal operating temp. This is a good way to try and determine whether the water is leaking through a hose, radiator, fitting, or if the water is going out through a headgasket. Basically you want to hope for a puddle underneath because that would be better than no puddle--no puddle would most likely mean headgasket. My issue is not losing water, i believe that im not moving ENOUGH water to properly cool the engine.


QUOTE (taurus GL'97 @ Jun 14 2009, 01:00 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732140
im having same problem, i just got overheated last month and i just did drain and refill the system last 6 months and did it again day after the overheat. and now notice after i rev (4k rpm) appear small bubles on the resevoir (just like there is some soap on it) and notice some slight coolant lost about 1/4 liter per week. is this an head gasket problem?[/b]
 

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QUOTE (imafordboi69 @ Jun 14 2009, 09:57 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732150
Well for that issue i would park the car on dry pavement, or put some cardboard under it and run the car till it gets to normal operating temp. This is a good way to try and determine whether the water is leaking through a hose, radiator, fitting, or if the water is going out through a headgasket. Basically you want to hope for a puddle underneath because that would be better than no puddle--no puddle would most likely mean headgasket. My issue is not losing water, i believe that im not moving ENOUGH water to properly cool the engine.


QUOTE (taurus GL'97 @ Jun 14 2009, 01:00 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732140
im having same problem, i just got overheated last month and i just did drain and refill the system last 6 months and did it again day after the overheat. and now notice after i rev (4k rpm) appear small bubles on the resevoir (just like there is some soap on it) and notice some slight coolant lost about 1/4 liter per week. is this an head gasket problem?[/b]
[/b][/quote]
how about the bubling thing in reservoir, is this normal? i think the system suck some air somewhere in the engine and pop through reservoir. and can anyone post a pic of the diagram of whole cooling system of gen3 taurus. thanks in advance!
 

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QUOTE (taurus GL'97 @ Jun 14 2009, 02:58 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732155
how about the bubling thing in reservoir, is this normal? i think the system suck some air somewhere in the engine and pop through reservoir. and can anyone post a pic of the diagram of whole cooling system of gen3 taurus. thanks in advance![/b]

That is pretty typical after a flush/fill, but it should go away after a while.
 

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Pull your radiator and give it a throught wsshing with a water hose. Yo will be amazined at thwat is in there. Clean the ac cdcondenso at the same time.


Mike
B)
 

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QUOTE (taurus GL'97 @ Jun 14 2009, 12:00 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732140
im having same problem, i just got overheated last month and i just did drain and refill the system last 6 months and did it again day after the overheat. and now notice after i rev (4k rpm) appear small bubles on the resevoir (just like there is some soap on it) and notice some slight coolant lost about 1/4 liter per week. is this an head gasket problem?[/b]
It's external dirt, not internal. See Here http://taurusclub.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=70403
 

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QUOTE (astc @ Jun 15 2009, 09:26 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732333
QUOTE (taurus GL'97 @ Jun 14 2009, 12:00 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732140
im having same problem, i just got overheated last month and i just did drain and refill the system last 6 months and did it again day after the overheat. and now notice after i rev (4k rpm) appear small bubles on the resevoir (just like there is some soap on it) and notice some slight coolant lost about 1/4 liter per week. is this an head gasket problem?[/b]
It's external dirt, not internal. See Here http://taurusclub.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=70403
[/b][/quote]
oohhh that topic came from me. which i did exactly what you tell me (clean radiator externally).
now my prob is the bubles creating when i rev in high rpm. which i think came from somewhere in the engine. is this an head gasket problem or something else?
 

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Did you burb the system after you flushed it?
 

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On a hot day your thermostat will be open continuously with a 160 thermostat and that causes over heating/higher temperatures.
[/quote]


Forgive me for being a bit skeptical, but how does the thermostat being open contribute to overheating? I'm all ears. :huh:
 

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A properly functioning stock water pump will flow more than enough coolant to keep the engine cool. If you're having overheating problems, the following are possiblities:

1. plugged radiator (externally)
2. low coolant
3. bad pump
4. thermostat failed closed

#4 almost never happens - thermostats are designed to fail open. if the water pump is bad, you can tell by looking in the reservoir - a properly functioning pump will produce a decent current in the reservoir. Low cooland will also show up in the reservoir. For a plugged radiator, the heater will work great, the coolant will flow properly, and the fans will kick on like they should.
 

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QUOTE (ArkanDan @ Jun 15 2009, 04:15 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732486
On a hot day your thermostat will be open continuously with a 160 thermostat and that causes over heating/higher temperatures.[/b]

Forgive me for being a bit skeptical, but how does the thermostat being open contribute to overheating? I'm all ears. :huh:
[/b][/quote]

Rather than cycling, the coolant just flows continuously and never cools properly or even heats/removes heat properly. Our cars cooling system was designed to cycle at 190F. A little cooler thermostat will cause the car to cycle more often, get to cool like 160F and the thermostat is in open position continuously on a hot day and the coolant never cycles it just flows and flows and flows and never has time to cool properly.

To test this theory just remove your thermostat and see what happens on a hot day and what happens on a cold day. When it's hot it never cools well enough but yes it probably won't over heat and on a cold day the car will take forever to get warm.
 

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so no one mention the probability of having a head gasket prob, the reason why i ask this is bec i have same issue from my recent car before the taurus (mitsubishi galant VR6) my mechanic told me it was the head gasket, so we change it, the bubles was lesen a bit. but did not xprience overheat after that. anyway, should i remove the thermostat for long drive so it will not overheat?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
QUOTE (2000Sable @ Jun 15 2009, 05:31 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732494
QUOTE (ArkanDan @ Jun 15 2009, 04:15 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732486
On a hot day your thermostat will be open continuously with a 160 thermostat and that causes over heating/higher temperatures.[/b]

Forgive me for being a bit skeptical, but how does the thermostat being open contribute to overheating? I'm all ears. :huh:
[/b][/quote]

Rather than cycling, the coolant just flows continuously and never cools properly or even heats/removes heat properly. Our cars cooling system was designed to cycle at 190F. A little cooler thermostat will cause the car to cycle more often, get to cool like 160F and the thermostat is in open position continuously on a hot day and the coolant never cycles it just flows and flows and flows and never has time to cool properly.

To test this theory just remove your thermostat and see what happens on a hot day and what happens on a cold day. When it's hot it never cools well enough but yes it probably won't over heat and on a cold day the car will take forever to get warm.
[/b][/quote]


I don't see the logic in this. With the water continuously moving, it never has the time to get super heated as it would if it was trapped cycling through just the engine. If having a 160 degree thermostat would always cause an overheating situation, why would they sell them? I have a 1968 F-250 with a 360 V8 and it hasn't had a thermostat since i got it 10 years ago and it has never over heated, it never gets warm enough to heat your feet in the winter, but it never over heats in the summer.
 

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QUOTE (imafordboi69 @ Jun 16 2009, 01:20 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732642
QUOTE (2000Sable @ Jun 15 2009, 05:31 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732494
QUOTE (ArkanDan @ Jun 15 2009, 04:15 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732486
On a hot day your thermostat will be open continuously with a 160 thermostat and that causes over heating/higher temperatures.[/b]

Forgive me for being a bit skeptical, but how does the thermostat being open contribute to overheating? I'm all ears. :huh:
[/b][/quote]

Rather than cycling, the coolant just flows continuously and never cools properly or even heats/removes heat properly. Our cars cooling system was designed to cycle at 190F. A little cooler thermostat will cause the car to cycle more often, get to cool like 160F and the thermostat is in open position continuously on a hot day and the coolant never cycles it just flows and flows and flows and never has time to cool properly.

To test this theory just remove your thermostat and see what happens on a hot day and what happens on a cold day. When it's hot it never cools well enough but yes it probably won't over heat and on a cold day the car will take forever to get warm.
[/b][/quote]


I don't see the logic in this. With the water continuously moving, it never has the time to get super heated as it would if it was trapped cycling through just the engine. If having a 160 degree thermostat would always cause an overheating situation, why would they sell them? I have a 1968 F-250 with a 360 V8 and it hasn't had a thermostat since i got it 10 years ago and it has never over heated, it never gets warm enough to heat your feet in the winter, but it never over heats in the summer.
[/b][/quote]

In the summer the water doesn't stay in the radiator long enough to cool off. In the winter the water doesn't stay in the block long enough to get hot.
You are right it probably won't over heat. It will run hot in the summer and cold in the winter. Running with no thermostat or a cold thermostat also means a higher ratio of water to coolant is better. 80 water 20 anti-freeze would help.
 

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QUOTE (2000Sable @ Jun 16 2009, 06:38 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=732662
In the summer the water doesn't stay in the radiator long enough to cool off. In the winter the water doesn't stay in the block long enough to get hot.
You are right it probably won't over heat. It will run hot in the summer and cold in the winter. Running with no thermostat or a cold thermostat also means a higher ratio of water to coolant is better. 80 water 20 anti-freeze would help.[/b]

On a super hot day, or when towing with my suburban, the engine temp can reach over 200 degrees. If an engine is running at this temp, then it is running past even the 195 thermostat. At this temp the thermostat is going to be open continuously. It is never going to close when its above this temp. With what you say, after a vehicle heats above the temp of the thermostat, it will continue to ramp up in temp until it boils over or you turn off the engine. Once a car reaches a temp above the set thermostat, the thermostat will remain open until the engine is able to cool from having the water constantly moving. Open thermostat==constantly moving water. Constantly moving water == better cooling capabilities. Pardon the pun, but your logic just doesn't hold water.
 
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