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anyone know where I can fin a place besides compusa that carrier a 160GB Western Digital hard drive with a 2MB cache? Compusa has them for $59.99 but they are sold out so I want to find a store such as best buy or staples that will price match it. I know this is a car forum but I thought mabey someone could help me out.
 

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Ok, i got my 160gb WD 8mb cache special eddition hard drive from offixe max for 69.99 after mail in rebate...which i got..

If you don't find any good rebates that you trust.. i always order from www.newegg.com

hope this helps

Jesse
 

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Originally posted by sabledale@Apr 19 2004, 06:53 PM
I don't believe newegg has a 2MB and not sure if they will price match. I seen the deal your talkin about but missed out.
i bet they have the hdd, but they wont price match.. a lot of places won't price match...

i think you're going to have to wait for another deal sorry man...


btw are you trying to get a hard drive for a RAID setup?? if not, there are plenty of other brands out there that you can get for cheap?
 

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Originally posted by godspunk32@Apr 19 2004, 07:31 PM
why would you want a HDD with a 2 mb cache instead of a faster drive with an 8 MB cache? I got a 120 GB Seagate Barracude "Special Edition", 7200 rpm drive, with 8 MB cache from Best Buy for 69 after rebate.

Watch the following sites for deals:
www.dealnews.com
www.techdeals.net
www.slickdeals.net
www.newegg.com
www.bensbargains.net
www.compuhq.com
www.tigerdirect.com

You should be able to find a 160 GB drive for about 80 bucks or so...

JR
he might have one already and want to setup a RAID array
 

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Originally posted by godspunk32@Apr 19 2004, 07:49 PM
But I think for RAID, he would be able to use any a drive with any cache level, as long as it is 160 GB...

JR
no, it has to have the same amount of clusters, etc.. so it pretty much has to be an identical drive...
 

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We're getting the best performance and reliability out of the Samsung drives here at the shop. Most of Samsungs line carrys a 3 year warrenty too. Most everyone else only gives you a 1 year now.
 

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We're getting the best performance and reliability out of the Samsung drives here at the shop. Most of Samsungs line carrys a 3 year warrenty too. Most everyone else only gives you a 1 year now.

Neweggs a great place.
So are we (TNG Micro) but we're still working on the site.
 

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Originally posted by afi292+Apr 19 2004, 07:54 PM-->QUOTE (afi292 @ Apr 19 2004, 07:54 PM)
<!--QuoteBegin-godspunk32
@Apr 19 2004, 07:49 PM
But I think for RAID, he would be able to use any a drive with any cache level, as long as it is 160 GB...

JR
no, it has to have the same amount of clusters, etc.. so it pretty much has to be an identical drive... [/b]
that isn't true. I had RAID setup with two different drives with different sizes and buffers. RAID that you know is software RAID, CPU with little help of RAID controller splits data into two stripes. Name , size, speed, buffer size don't have to match.
 

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Originally posted by Postmortem+Apr 19 2004, 07:58 PM-->QUOTE (Postmortem @ Apr 19 2004, 07:58 PM)
Originally posted by [email protected] 19 2004, 07:54 PM
<!--QuoteBegin-godspunk32
@Apr 19 2004, 07:49 PM
But I think for RAID, he would be able to use any a drive with any cache level, as long as it is 160 GB...

JR

no, it has to have the same amount of clusters, etc.. so it pretty much has to be an identical drive...
that isn't true. I had RAID setup with two different drives with different sizes and buffers. RAID that you know is software RAID, CPU with little help of RAID controller splits data into two stripes. Name , size, speed, buffer size don't have to match. [/b]
Do you like losing data, and having errors?

Do you like having windows crash?!?!?

i think you [email protected][email protected][email protected]


Use two different hard drives in a RAID ARRAY and tell me, how does it feel!??!?!
 

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A bit late to chime in on this but Pricewatch is another great engine for finding low prices on computer deals. I got a bunch of stuff from there. On the bad side, some of the stuff is really shady, but not everything. Hell, I like it a bit shady anyway
 

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Originally posted by afi292+Apr 19 2004, 07:05 PM-->QUOTE (afi292 @ Apr 19 2004, 07:05 PM)
Originally posted by [email protected] 19 2004, 07:58 PM
Originally posted by [email protected] 19 2004, 07:54 PM
<!--QuoteBegin-godspunk32
@Apr 19 2004, 07:49 PM
But I think for RAID, he would be able to use any a drive with any cache level, as long as it is 160 GB...

JR

no, it has to have the same amount of clusters, etc.. so it pretty much has to be an identical drive...

that isn't true. I had RAID setup with two different drives with different sizes and buffers. RAID that you know is software RAID, CPU with little help of RAID controller splits data into two stripes. Name , size, speed, buffer size don't have to match.
Do you like losing data, and having errors?

Do you like having windows crash?!?!?

i think you [email protected][email protected][email protected]


Use two different hard drives in a RAID ARRAY and tell me, how does it feel!??!?! [/b]
With a RAID controller card, you can use two different hdd setups. It's just basically an PCI to IDE adapter card.


I have a WD 80G 8mb cache special edition(sounds like the crap names that cars makers put out)hdd, and a 20G seagate on a RAID card.
 

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Originally posted by afi292+Apr 19 2004, 08:05 PM-->QUOTE (afi292 @ Apr 19 2004, 08:05 PM)
Originally posted by [email protected] 19 2004, 07:58 PM
Originally posted by [email protected] 19 2004, 07:54 PM
<!--QuoteBegin-godspunk32
@Apr 19 2004, 07:49 PM
But I think for RAID, he would be able to use any a drive with any cache level, as long as it is 160 GB...

JR

no, it has to have the same amount of clusters, etc.. so it pretty much has to be an identical drive...

that isn't true. I had RAID setup with two different drives with different sizes and buffers. RAID that you know is software RAID, CPU with little help of RAID controller splits data into two stripes. Name , size, speed, buffer size don't have to match.
Do you like losing data, and having errors?

Do you like having windows crash?!?!?

i think you [email protected][email protected][email protected]


Use two different hard drives in a RAID ARRAY and tell me, how does it feel!??!?! [/b]
How about you go somewhere and read about RAID, then come back, and apologize?

I would love to expain RAID 0/1/5 to you, but you don't want to listen or to understand.
 

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Postmortem-

You've got RAID 0 running then, right? My memory on the subject is a bit hazy (I'm a laptop guy, one hard drive is good enough for me), but the only RAID you can get away with two different sized volumes is 0 (a "fake" RAID anyway) . All the rest are redundant, so they need the same size disk (except for 0+1 where the two sets of volumes need to be the same).

From the way I understand RAID, you need a (hardware) controller for level 3 and above (err, level 2 also, but that really doesn't exist yet). The drives don't have to be the exact same for use of RAID, but they should be. Manufacturer doesn't matter as much as the size because you're making redundant copies of your data stripes, so it all needs to fit. RAID 0 doesn't need the same volume because it's just striping, so you can store more on one than the other. Level 1 is the simplest (real RAID) to use and is usually found in PC's, all the others are used for servers, but most notably level 5. The whole "you have to use the exact same HD" notion comes from (I think), the PC manufacturers who say you need the same HD. To use RAID 1 the sizes have to be the same, and since the manufacturer has a stockpile of those drives, taa daa, you have to select that drive.

Okay, I'm tired so I'm getting confusing. I really don't care too much about the subject, as I'm not an IT guy. Just throwing down my two cents to clear some stuff up.
 

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It has been my experience that with striping only with no redundancy you can run different drives on a IDE setup. Most hardware SCSI RAID controllers, require same drives and in some cases the same firmware levels in the drive to work properly. Some of the large multi-node machines have 500TB+ on line in multiple shared RAID cabinets. The performance first regardless of the price will run a combination of Level 0 and 1; striped and mirrorred array.

Bob
 

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Originally posted by jedhead@Apr 20 2004, 11:35 PM
Most hardware SCSI RAID controllers, require same drives and in some cases the same firmware levels in the drive to work properly.
That's because the SCSI RAID controller will actually treat the two drives as if they are one large drive, splitting the data over both hdd's, right?
 

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Okay, here is easy explanation if RAID from me.

Redundant Array of Inexpensive Drives
We have three major types
RAID 0, called stripping
RAID 1, also called as mirroring
RAID 5.
There are subtypes - combining RAID 0 and 1 for example

RAID 0, stripping: 2 disk drives min. Depending on controller, you can have 2,4, 8 etc.
Stripe is usually between 4KB and 128KB.
In this case, one file is split to two drives. Lets say stripe size is 64KB
If you have 128KB file, 64KB goes to one and 64KB to other hard drive.
If you have 63KB file, 63KB goes to one and nothing to second.
If you have 1024KB file, 64KB goes to one and 64KB to other hard drive, and next 64KB to first and next 64KB to second and so on and so on.
Striped disk size: 2x size of smaller disk in case of two drives total ( when you run out of space on 1st, you cannot split files any longer).
Advantages: Faster read and write.
Disadvantages: Unsafe: if one drive fails, everything is lost. no redundancy

RAID 1, mirroring. 2drives min, you can use 3,4,5 etc.
In this case, one file is copied to two drives. Both drives contain same data.
Mirrored disk size: 1x size of smallest disk.
Advantages: redundancy, faster read time
Disadvantages: space lost, no write speed increased

RAID 5: 3 drives min.
Simplified, this is RAID 0 where drives use "error correction" method where beside regular file data, redundancy data is stored on disk. In case of one of three disk fails, other two contain enough information to rebuild RAID when you get in hold of new disk.
RAID 5 disk size: less than 3 drives, I don't remember how much exactly.
Obviously this has all advantages of both RAID 0 and 1, but you need good controller.

Now about controllers. Cheap ones, found on mainstream motherboards, are soft RAID controllers ( like Win modems). They have some logic, but they depend heavily on CPU for calculating/splitting data to array.
Expensive ones, for servers, have much better DSP, and they have their own memory onboard of controller. They are around 10 times more expensive.
 
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