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Discussion Starter #1
How-to Change Rear Spark Plugs on a 2000 Ford Taurus with a Duratec Engine,Without Disturbing the Upper Intake Manifold

1. I only recommend tackling this job, if you have a 3/8-in. drive Craftsman 3-piece quick-release extension bar set or equivalent, 3/8-in. universal joint, 3/8-in. drive ratchet, 3/8-in. drive torque wrench (calibrated in inch-pounds), 3/8-in drive 8mm socket, 5/8-in. spark plug socket with sponge rubber plug holder for a 3/8-in drive ratchet, silicone spray, 10” piece of 3/8-in. I.D.fuel line, Motorcraft Silicone Brake Caliper Grease and Dielectric Compound, Motorcraft AGSF-32W platinum plugs, and a tube of Permatex Anti-Seize Lubricant (133A). I used factory-recommended plugs, since my experience using cross-referenced plugs has not been good. I definitely didn’t want to repeat that experience here. The original plugs were 4-1/2 years old and had 51,000 miles on them. Make sure the engine is “stone cold” before removing any spark plugs or you increase the risk of stripping the threads in the aluminum head.

2. Silicone-spray the sponge rubber plug holder inside the spark plug socket now, so that the newly installed plug will not pull the socket off the extension bar in the spark plug tube later. You don’t need to add any more tension to the job, by losing control of anything in the deep spark plug tubes on the backside of the engine. Disconnect the electrical connector to the plug coil on the left rear plug (all work is performed from the passenger side of the engine). Use the 8mm socket and ratchet to remove the hex-head bolt securing the plug coil. Lift ignition coil pack out; clean with a rag and silicone spray; and apply silicone dielectric compound, using a small screwdriver, to the inside of the spring wire going to the plug. Set the coil pack aside for now.

3. Connect the 6” quick-release extension bar to the spark plug socket. Insert into spark plug tube and seat over plug. “Build-up” the extension by attaching a 3” quick-release extension bar. Next, use a ½” drive 15” flex “T” handle, connected to a ½” x 3/8” socket adapter, and remove the plug. A 3/8-in. drive ratchet did not provide enough leverage to remove the factory-installed plug.

4. Once again, connect the 6” quick-release extension bar to the spark plug socket. Insert a new, properly gapped plug in socket and apply a half pea-size drop of anti-seize compound to the threads, making sure not to get any on the plug’s electrode or porcelain. As the plug is threaded, the compound will coat the threads. If too much anti-seize is applied, you run the risk of it clogging the threads, baking on, and making it very difficult to remove the plug next time. Install the spark plug into the spark plug tube. Rotate the extension bar and seat the plug, being careful not to cross-thread the plug. Once again, “build-up” the extension, by connecting the 3” quick-release extension bar. Using the 3/8” universal joint on top of the 3” extension bar, attach the 3/8-in. drive torque wrench and tighten the plug by applying 84 in.-lbs. of torque. Use the lower end of the torque specs (7 to 14 ft.-lbs.) because anti-seize lubricant increases the actual torque by around 40%. Reinstall the ignition coil pack, electrical connector, and hex-head bolt.

5. Using this same technique, you will be able to change the rear middle and right rear plugs. On the right rear plug, however, I had to insert the plug into a 10” section of 3/8” I.D. tubing and thread the plug into the spark plug tube. Make sure to insert the porcelain portion of the plug far enough into the tubing, so it doesn’t fall off as you’re feeding it into the spark plug tube. Space is limited, so take your time. Much of this is done by “feel,” since visibility is poor.
 

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Top,

1st off thanks for writing that up. Was just getting around to doing the plugs (maybe) on my otherwise pristine well serviced '00 Sable Duratec. I read someone else here who changed the plugs without taking the intake off, too.

A few questions...... You mentioned AGSF-32W plugs. Where'd you get them and what'd you pay? I don't "see" any AGSF-32W's around. I see 32WM's at Rockauto.com (for $2.65 each plus $4.80 shipping Total for 6 $21). I agree with you and only want OEM plugs.

Is this the order of wrench "build-up?"

socket, then 6" extension, then 3" extension, then universal then 3/8 to 1/2 adaptor then 1/2" driver?

I bought my car with 77,000 miles and don't know if the plugs were ever changed. I'm pretty sure they haven't been since the manual calls for replacement at 100,000 miles. I pulled a front plug just to check the condition in it looked perfect. Not worn or ashed up or anything. Perfect.... so I wonder if I should change them at all.

Anyway..... your next task is to change your PCV without taking the intake off. Then write it up as to how you did it. It's under that square bundle of wires on the drivers side.

And one other thing........ I just read an article on some mechanics website called "The half tune-up." Seems mechanics are getting cars in that run poorly but have had a tuneup in the last year or so. Turn's out the back plugs were never replaced. They said they get a bunch of cars in like that.... different plugs (oem's) in the rear bank then what's in the front.

Guess that's one reason we service our cars ourselves.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I purchased the AGSF-32W plugs from O'Reilly Auto Parts for $2.10 each. MotorCraft changes their plug numbers from time-to-time and I think the number you have is new number (AGSF-32WMF6). You have the "build-up" sequence correct.

My plugs also looked in great shape, however I could tell a distinct improvement after I replaced them. In fact, so could my wife.
 

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Will, you've convinced me to go ahead and change them.

Don't know of that parts place here in North Cakalackey but Rockauto looks to be OK. BTW, here's a site that gives you OEM parts and their numbers for your particular model Ford or Merc....

http://www.motorcraft.com/

I've seen AGSF 32WMF6's as well listed for the '00 Duratec.

Now get on changing out the PCV withou taking the intake off.
 

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Yeah...I'm changing the PCV this weekend...but I'm doing the hard way (which may be easier than not taking the intake off). Hopefully all will go smoothly.

JR
 

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Just finished changing plugs on the '00 Duratec. Ordered the plugs from Rockauto.com for $2.65 each plus shipping for a total of about $21. Ordered them Friday afternoon and they arrived on Tuesday afternoon.

Did the front three plugs no problem at all. Did one back plug each morning. Bending forward stresses my back so I keep this type activity to a minimum. But also I wanted to road test the car after adding each of the plugs so if there was a miss I knew which plug was a problem. I used Top's wrench build up instruction above with a slight variation. I used the socket, then the 6" extension, the the 3" extension and then the 3/8 to 1/2 converter that acts as an additional 1 " extension. My non-craftsman, swivelhead 1/2" drive fit perfectly above the intake but without hitting the lip of the coweling on the firewall. One thing bothersome to me about doing these plugs is the boot does not snap onto the top of the plug. There's no way of knowing if you're seated on the plug correctly. But after pushing the boot down and bolting the coil deal back it must be pretty secure.

Topgun is correct in that this is mostly done by feel because once your arm is back there you really can't see anything. Also, I want to point out.... I did all the work from the passenger side of the car. Hung over the fender, used my left arm to put the wrench parts and extensions on and used my right arm over the top of the intake to work the wrench.

This is not very hard at all. Unless you have some other reason to remove the intake I think you're making a big mistake removing the intake just to change those back plugs. Just get your wrench and extensions in order as described above.... One other thing, I used a 1/4 drive with a 3" pls a 1" extension with the 8mm socket that hold the coil on. This brought the wrench just above the intake, no problem.


Now I'm just waiting to read how Topgun changes his PCV valve without removing the intake.
 

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I have changed them twice now on my duratec with the coil packs mounted on top of each spark plug. Its not too bad for room back there. But it is definitely all feel. Has anyone been able to do their pcv with out taking off the intake? If so, How? That thing is buried right in there. ;)

Nate Dogg
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Nice job, John in Charlotte. What I love about doing things yourself is that there is a before and after--you get that sense of accomplishment. It builds confidence for tackling other problems in life, as well. I was quoted $140 from one dealer to $200 from another for doing what you just accomplished. Now, send the savings into your S&P 500 index fund!
 

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I've done all the maintenance required on this car but I won't feel the job is ALL done until that PCV is dealt with. The cars got 84,000 miles and the manual calls for PCV replacement at 100,000 miles. So the clock is ticking....... sort of.

Actually, unless there's a problem or unless someone on this board finds an easy way to replace the PVC, I think mine is going to remain on this car as long as I own it. Was glad to read GS32's report that when he removed his PCV it was in good shape with 80 some thousand miles.

Funny you should mention S&P 500 Index funds..... I've worked on Wall Street, worked for 3 Wall Street broker firms, and still maintain securities and comodity licenses..... When anyone asks me about investments I say just get a good S&P Index fund..... no load, for sure..... (See Vanguard) and put all you can in it. And that's all you need to know..... I wouldn't ever call a broker and would not allow most to even pet my dog.

So what about the PCV valve? Eh?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
John in Charlotte, we must think along the same lines. I probably won't be changing my PCV valve anytime soon, since one of the benefits of using a quality synthetic engine oil is that you get very low evaporation (NOACK Volatility--ASTM D-5800 test). Hence, there are much fewer crankcase gases that are being recycled through the PCV system. I've never had to replace the PCV valve or hoses on my Honda, either. They are always very clear. You can't say that about many cars run on petroleum oil. The benefits of using quality synthetics goes on and on.
 

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To get to the PVC valve all you have to do is remove the throttlebody. 3 hose fitting and 4 bolts to get it off. The PCV is under the UIM right behind where the throttlebody was. It's actually fitted between to hoses and not on the engine.
 

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Replacing the PCV is really easy as JTH states, I did it at the same tiem I had to repace a cooling hose under the TB, you might as well check those while yopu are under there. One of the hoses has a pastic fitting that corroded aaway on mine, I think it was about $80 to get new one from dealershipo so be gentle with the hoses as you chaeck them
 

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Originally posted by jth877@Sep 8 2004, 03:13 PM
To get to the PVC valve all you have to do is remove the throttlebody. 3 hose fitting and 4 bolts to get it off. The PCV is under the UIM right behind where the throttlebody was. It's actually fitted between to hoses and not on the engine.
On my 00 Duratec, the PCV valve was located on the engine between the fuel rails, under a large bundle of wires.

Refer to the post I made several months ago. I was [sarcasm on] "slightly disappointed" [/sarcasm] to find that my car wasn't as easy to change the PCV valve as some people have it.

Link to previous post about PCV valve on 2000 Duratec
 
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