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Ramps I own have a soft rubber insert on the

low end which, when the car tire makes contact with the ramp, provide friction to keep the ramps from sliding.

As long as I go nice and slow, no problems - and I have one of those paver stone driveways with loose sand on the surface. I try to sweep the area before starting and also make sure to line them up very carefully.

The only time I had a ramp slide was when backing down the last few inches and gave it some throttle and the ramp shot forward a few inches. Otherwise, they work great for most under the engine work.

I feel more confident raising a front-wheel drive car with the ramps than a RWD because of the better traction control with the FWD up the ramps.
 

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I like 2000sables idea of using some old rubber hose on the bottom of the metal ramps, so they don't slide on hard pavement. I use an old piece of carpet under mine & it works ok, but I like the rubber hose idea better.

I too center the ramps on the wheel, then open the door & lean out to make sure I'm on the ramp centered & use one foot on the gas, the other on the brake, to slowly power up the ramp at light throttle. You can see & feel the flat & wheel stop atop the ramp. Of course on a straight drive, it's a little more of a challange to feather the throttle while slipping the clutch to ease up the ramp.

DON'T use ramps, stands, or jacks on soft or unlevel ground. as the weight of the vehicle can cause them to sink into the soil & tip over!!!!

At the top of the ramp, put the auto tranny vehicle in Park, the manual tranny in 1'st gear, set the emergency brake & Use wheel chocks under both rear wheels.

If you don't have a hard level surface to use the ramps or stands on, pick the most level hardest surface available, put at least a 1/2 inch thick piece of plywood under the ramps, stands, or jack, so it won't sink into the soft surface. Soft surface would also include asphalt!!!!! Yup in summer asphalt gets soft enough that stands, jacks & the like will sink into the asphalt, so be mindful of that if it's hot where you live, if the vehicle will be raised for an extended period of time, use plywood under the support you choose.

If the wheels are removed for the work being done, consider using the removed wheels under the frame rail as back up support, in case your lift support fails.

We should be mindful that Anytime we're under a raised vehicle, our life is in the hands of gravity & the lift support we choose!!!!! DON'T rely on a jack alone.
Edit: If I'm using stands, I also leave the jack in place, just in case something happens to a stand!!!!

If your going to be working alone under a vehicle, consider having a cell phone on you within easy reach, in case something happens & you need help!!!!!

Take the time to work safe, don't trust your life & limb to any ONE thing!!!!

More lift thoughts for pondering.
 

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Great safety tips - often when we're under

time pressures, we forget about the need to ensure that the work environment is as hazard free as possible.

Living in earthquake country, I use both ramps and jackstands and keep my fingers crossed when under the car.
 

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I've been using car ramps for over 20 years now. Never gone over the edge - although I've certainly worried about it the last 9 years. Why? I have the red metal ramps. I originally bought them in the 80's for the three Colts I owned when I started doing my own repairs. For a 13" wheel, never really had a worry. But then I bought a '97 Taurus wagon new in '98 (leftover) which had 15" wheels. A little trickier than the Colts, but still pretty easy.

But then came the '02 Impala with it's 16" wheels. Certainly not BIG wheels, but wouldn't you know it - these tires are wider than the other two cars and the tire ends up pinching the molded rails of the ramps. It's much more dicey than the other two cars to get the car up the ramps and then sit the tires in the "well". The ramp is really too narrow for these tires.

Now I've added a 2011 Equinox, which has 18" wheels. I really don't think I can use these ramps with this car. But I'm hoping that maybe I won't NEED any ramps for this car (to change the oil, at least). But if I DO have to buy a new set, I'll probably go with the Rhinos because they're wider, flatter, and lower (I've got red paint scuff marks on the underside of both the Taurus and Impala because my metal ramps have too steep of an incline).

But I like the look of those white ones someone bought - with the stop rail at the end. They don't look very tall, but they're probably good enough. Where were they bought? All I ever see are the black honeycomb ones in the stores (for around $50).

One other thing I'll add is that when I initially started using my metal ramps, I always did my work in the street (because there was no driveway). But now that I have a driveway, I use the ramps on the GRASS for two reasons: the metal ramps will damage the surface of the concrete, AND because I don't want any staining on the concrete (even the smallest droplets). Using the grass in the winter is not a problem (because the ground is frozen). In the summer the ramps DO sink into the ground a bit, but this is also not a problem as long as you've driven onto them properly and they are not tipped too much off center (hopefully they are not tipped AT ALL, but they probably will be a little bit). Tipping the ramps off center too much can cause undue stress to the horizontal support bars. I've actually had the tack welds on these metal bars crack on me - and the bars became detached !! (I had to get them re-welded). If you've got the metal ramps, you don't want to lose these welded horizontal supports because they help maintain the ramp's rigidity and shape. Without them, the ramps could probably become deformed over time, creating an unsafe situation.
 

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Tipping the ramps off center too much can cause undue stress to the horizontal support bars. I've actually had the tack welds on these metal bars crack on me - and the bars became detached !! (I had to get them re-welded). If you've got the metal ramps, you don't want to lose these welded horizontal supports because they help maintain the ramp's rigidity and shape. Without them, the ramps could probably become deformed over time, creating an unsafe situation.
Another reason to use ramps on a firm surface.

Especially with the way the plastic ramps are constructed, the internal braces are designed to bear weight when the car is directly over the braces. If the orientation of the brace is not directly vertical (when one side of the ramp is lower than the other - maybe when one side sinks into a soft, uneven surface), I would be concerned that the weight bearing capability and stability of the ramp might be compromised.
 

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Another reason to use ramps on a firm surface.

Especially with the way the plastic ramps are constructed, the internal braces are designed to bear weight when the car is directly over the braces. If the orientation of the brace is not directly vertical (when one side of the ramp is lower than the other - maybe when one side sinks into a soft, uneven surface), I would be concerned that the weight bearing capability and stability of the ramp might be compromised.
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Well, the welds on my metal ramps broke because they were cheap tack welds from the factory. Using them on the grass probably helped to crack them, but since I've had them re-welded (with a much better weld), I've used them much more frequently with more (and heavier) cars for several years now without any problems.

And if I had the plastic ramps, I probably WOULD be on the driveway because the plastic wouldn't harm the concrete surface. Also, I wouldn't be surprised if the makers of the plastic ramps TELL YOU to use them on a solid, flat surface due to the construction material (plastic) and design (honeycomb, truss-like).

My advice to anybody out there with the metal ramps is: go ahead and use them on the grass or dirt if you want. Unless you're placing them on quicksand, they're only gonna sink about an inch into the ground. It's not like the car's gonna keep sinking while you're underneath. Just make sure they're mostly (vertically) straight before you drive the car up on them. What I do is set 'em up, then jump up on them (landing my feet on the "rails" to either side of the wheel well) to drive the ramps into the ground. This slightly pre-sinks them (which keeps them from moving), and gives me a good feeling that they'll be mostly vertically-straight once the car is on them. Sometimes the ramps end up slightly tipped one way or the other, but still - the car isn't going anywhere and you won't have any problem driving back down the ramps, either. But you're putting more stress on those horizontal stabilizer bars when the ramps are not mostly vertically straight, so make sure the welds on these bars are good and substantial (not just tack welds).
 

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I've had my Yukon up on my trusty old red metal ramps many times. Putting up the Sable is a non concern.
I would worry more about these cheap Chinese jacks, never ever trust them, get the stands out and under the car everytime. Even on just tire changes/rotations.
 

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Perhaps this may help those that are worried about over-shooting the end of work ramps, before placing the ramps, park the car in the same area you intend to work on it, drop 2 pieces of 2x4 in front of the rear wheels, also place something as a marker inline with your left shoulder (for LH drive). Use that as a visual guide so you know just how much further you've got to go. Back-up, place the ramps and drive on to them, watching for the marker to line your shoulder up, and at the same time waiting for the rear wheels to touch the 2x4. The safest way of them all is too rip the concrete floor up in the garage and put a pit in - - thats if the BOSS-LADY agrees!!.

Stay safe!.
 

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You could always get these. They get all four wheels off of the ground and the center section is removable for easier access. There is also a lip on the end to help prevent driving off the end. Then you could lend them to me as there is no way the wife would let me throw down the $$$ for these.

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Race-Ramps-RR-PPS-Standard-Portable/dp/B003ZACEY2/ref=sr_1_8?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1347823615&sr=1-8&keywords=ramps[/ame]
 

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I read this whole thread and didn't see this mentioned...
Put the parking brake on halfway.
Don't give it too much gas or you will squeal your tires trying to go up (experience).

If it's too much resistance let it off a few more clicks.
If it's not enough put it on harder.

I use my plastic rhino ramps on concrete, rough concrete at that tears up the knees. They have slid a few times but they've never shot under the car because I am always on top of it with the parking brake and the regular brakes.

I have drove the Taurus up it several times. The first time I tried it is when I squealed my tires cause I had the brake on too hard and it melted a cool looking little tread pattern into the bottom of my right ramp.

I loosened the parking brake and up she went without any problem. Zero slide at the top.

As a side note, I have ran my charger up these ramps several times too. P225-60-18 wheels.
I have had no problems with the 18 inch wheels. However if they were any bigger they probably would not fit on the ramps very well and might overhang the "lip".
 
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