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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello.

The other day my 01 Taurus SE started making the dreaded chirping noise. There also is a mild leak coming from around the sensor housing(possibly the O-ring failed). I am going to have to change the camshaft positioning sensor and syncronizer and just had a question.

Since I caught the chirp immediately, would it be possible to just change the sensor? Does the sensor control the amount of oil which the syncronizer receives? Thanks. Just trying to save a few bucks if I can, but don't want to seize up my engine over it.

There are several threads on here over the CPS, but haven't seen one on how it interacts with the syncronizer.
 

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The sensor is a "senses", it doesn't "control" anything. The sensor has a magnetic pickup - it triggers every time a little metal "tang" on top of the syncronizer passes in front of it. The sensor sends a signal to the PCM to control injector timing.

If it's chirping, it's the syncro. The syncro also drives the oil pump. If oil is truly coming out from the sensor, then I'd suspect you've got some serious problems as the oil is coming up through the syncro into the sensor.

If the oil is coming up at the base of the syncro, it's also suspicious.
 

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Your sensor (the plastic device that is installed on

top of the synchronizer) is probably OK.

If you're seeing oil under the sensor, the bearing sleeve of the synchronizer is very worn and oil is being expelled or migrating from the engine our of the synchronizer.

You can purchase just the synchronizer body from Ford and move the sensor over, or replace both of them. The sensor won't fail unless the synchro comes apart and the little tang mentioned hits it.
 

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Just the syncronizer will be enough. The sensor is just "sitting" on top, and like it was said will be damaged only if parts from the syncronizer hits it.
Replacing it usually needs some alignment tool or just carefull measuring of the initial relative position of the flag with the sensor window:

 

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If you have no CEL/codes, then the sensor is functioning correctly. The synchro chirp? Potentially fatal...
 

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I had a syncro fail and cause my engine to miss and buck around with no engine code! Replaced the syncro and everything works fine now. Depending where you get your new syncro it may come with a new cam sensor already with it.
 

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I had a syncro fail and cause my engine to miss and buck around with no engine code! Replaced the syncro and everything works fine now. Depending where you get your new syncro it may come with a new cam sensor already with it.
Maybe the shaft broke above the gear, sensor signal failure makes PCM go to default timing, you still had oil though. Total failure includes loss of oil pump drive gear at bottom of synchro and complete engine failure from lack of lubrication. Been there....
 

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Just the syncronizer will be enough. The sensor is just "sitting" on top, and like it was said will be damaged only if parts from the syncronizer hits it.
Replacing it usually needs some alignment tool or just carefull measuring of the initial relative position of the flag with the sensor window:

Good picture of the synchronizer with the sensor removed.

To OP, when you get to this point, mark with a Sharpie pen the position of the flag (in this picture, it is at the 6 o'clock position), then clean off the cylinder head where the synchro mounts so the metal is bright and clean (brake cleaner and a rag works well).

Mark a location on both the cylinder head and the synchro body, i.e. you will draw a continuous mark starting on the cylinder head and running up to the sychro body.

Pull the old synchro and transcribe the marks to the new part. These marks will allow you to align the flag in the new synchro and then align the synchro body to the cylinder head.

Put some new motor oil on the synchro gear, put the new synchro in the cylinder head while maintaining the orientation of the flag to the synchro body. You may have to withdraw, adjust and reinsert the synchro until the mark on the synchro aligns with the previous mark on the cylinder head. This is because of the gear design (helical or worm, I don't remember).

Once all marks align, bolt everything down, reinstall the sensor and connect it back up.
 

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Actually, the whole new assambly can end up being slightly rotated relative to the cylinder head/engine bay.

Important is to recreate exactly the relative position between the interior "flag" and the middle of the side opening (that holds the sensor head).
The "flag" will engage the internal gears of the camshaft and the oil pump shaft (it's a square), so it is not movable. The outter part get rotated till gets alingned, and after that, the bottom bolt (from the picture) get tighten to hold the outer part in place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Cool. Just went up to Autozone and ordered the synchronizer.

The counter guy was hellbent on selling me a Dorman, but I told him I needed the remaned Cartone(apparently they are more reliable than the new Cartones).

Going to have to do the job without the sync tool, so hopefully it will turn out well.

So according to Sonic67, the orientation of the inner and outer parts is thats important. Will mark with lines to make sure that the alignment goes correctly.

Thanks for the information and will let you know how it goes tomorrow.

PS. In the Haynes book it says to make sure to crank the engine by hand so that piston #1 in up. Do you even need to crank the engine as long
as the synchro is correctly aligned?
 

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Actually, the whole new assambly can end up being slightly rotated relative to the cylinder head/engine bay.

Important is to recreate exactly the relative position between the interior "flag" and the middle of the side opening (that holds the sensor head).
The "flag" will engage the internal gears of the camshaft and the oil pump shaft (it's a square), so it is not movable. The outter part get rotated till gets alingned, and after that, the bottom bolt (from the picture) get tighten to hold the outer part in place.
Yes, it is very important that the final positioning of the newly installed synchro results in the relative positioning of the flag in the sensor recess.

Also make sure that the engine is not turned over from when you started, otherwise, you will need the tool and get cylinder 1 to TDC to correctly install the synchro. Disconnecting the battery before you start is a good idea.

PS. In the Haynes book it says to make sure to crank the engine by hand so that piston #1 in up. Do you even need to crank the engine as long as the synchro is correctly aligned?
You do not need to have cylinder 1 at TDC if you use the method we're discussing since you are simply preserving the position of the timing flag relative to wherever cylinder 1 happened to be at the time.
 
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