Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The car is an '02 and the engine is the basic 3.0 OHV. Just over 100k miles on it. Engine running fine and no codes.


The engine just started to make a chirping or squeaking noise on the driver's side, underneath the throttle body. I've researched this a bit already and am 99% sure it is the camshaft position sensor or synchronizer, or maybe both, but I need some clarification.


It seems the sensor is just the cap on the top, and an easy replacement, once you get a few things out of the way,


The synchronizer is below the sensor, has a shaft on it like a distributor, and also drives the oil pump. It is more complicated to replace because the timing has to be set just right when you do it.


I just want to know if the chirp noise is usually the sensor cap on top, or the synchronizer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I was having the same issue you were for a little bit, though I did have a code for Cam pos. sensor.
Had to replace that and synchronizer, it's a tad involved for a diy project but I managed to do it. 98/100 the synchronizer itself is gonna be the issue it seems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies. I am considering a DIY fix for this but have never done any work that involved the engine timing. Not sure how to rotate the engine by hand and know for certain that #1 is at TDC. I assume I can rent or borrow that special tool from AutoZone, required to adjust the sync.


Any tips or links for getting to TDC and dealing with that wiring harness, which I see is clearly in the way, would be great.


If all else fails I know a reputable mechanic that can do the work, and I have another car to drive until this one is fixed. However, any time I can save paying a few hours labor, life is good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
If you use the installation tool you do not have to worry about TDC. I have replace three using the tool. I use a socket on the alternator nut to turn the engine until the tool fits into the synchro head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
You can do this repair. Sounds as if you have done some reading. I did this last May, with great apprehension over the timing issue, TDC, etc. I did as much reading as I could, took advice to get an actual MotorCraft part. Many people were able to make reference marks, remove CS, then reinstall according to the marks. If you are able to remove and replace exactly, timing or TDC is not an issue. I wanted to do this but had visions of messed up timing, a tow, and more money to correct my work. I finally read someone else's procedure and that gave me the confidence to try. You have to get down to CS, the wiring harness is clumsy and difficult, tied off with cord. I then used a large socket on the crankshaft pulley bolt to turn the engine, I had no luck turning with the alternator but that would be more accessible and easier. Agree with Automender 12345, I with a helper carefully turned the engine until the tool fits passively onto cam synchronizer. I made a reference mark at the rear and removed. CS will rotate slightly upon removal. Replace using the tool on new CS, make sure it goes in matching your rear reference, I hit it first try, no timing problems, no CEL. Take your time. With the tool it does not matter whether you are at TCD on compression or exhaust. Automender 12345 was a lot more concise, but I was where you are last May. Good luck.


Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
I needed to pinch the belt on the alternator pulley to get enough tension to turn the engine. I attached pictures from my 2006 of how I marked the manifold to make sure it returned in the same location. I believe it isn't really that critical and it is only so the connector is in the right location. The trick is the tool is locking the trigger finger in the right location relative to the body of the synchronizer. As long as the engine doesn't turn, it is the relative to the trigger finger to the engine position that is important. Marking it and getting it back into the same position is better.

On my 2006 I removed the upper manifold because I wanted to clean the internals and the EGR area. It does make the replacement a piece of cake because that darn wiring harness that goes right over the CS. On my 2001s I ended up snapping the plastic wiring cover to get to the CS. You really have to tie the harness back with wire or string.

Take a few pics of the marks so you can remember. Camera is your friend when working on your car.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
When you do this project. Do not use a large rachet to tighten the two thin sensor bolts (6mm) - tighten them slowly. I used a longer rachet wrench, and snapped one without any effort. Needing to replace the synchronizer AGAIN because the bottom of the bolt was still in the synchronizer. Just be gentle!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
I needed to pinch the belt on the alternator pulley to get enough tension to turn the engine. I attached pictures from my 2006 of how I marked the manifold to make sure it returned in the same location. I believe it isn't really that critical and it is only so the connector is in the right location. The trick is the tool is locking the trigger finger in the right location relative to the body of the synchronizer. As long as the engine doesn't turn, it is the relative to the trigger finger to the engine position that is important. Marking it and getting it back into the same position is better.

On my 2006 I removed the upper manifold because I wanted to clean the internals and the EGR area. It does make the replacement a piece of cake because that darn wiring harness that goes right over the CS. On my 2001s I ended up snapping the plastic wiring cover to get to the CS. You really have to tie the harness back with wire or string.

Take a few pics of the marks so you can remember. Camera is your friend when working on your car.



The other thing I found helpful was to take a few pictures with your cell phone just as Automender did to assure yourself that it is in the same position as the way it came out. Are there still claims that the Dorman syncro is bad? For all the talk there appears to have possibly been one failure reported since 2009 on the sticky thread.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top