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Discussion Starter #1
i've put new rotors and pads on my car. but now my brake pedal feels very spongy. i bled the lines and removed all of the air yet my brakes feel spongy. did i miss something?
 

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when I get a new set of rotors the first thing I do before installing them is take them out of the plastic wrapper and wash them real real good with hot water and dishwashing soap. Then they get rinsed and dried completely. This gets rid of all that oily stuff that is on the rotors that is put on them so they don't rust while sitting on the shelf.
If this oily stuff was not cleaned off it could give your brakes a mushy feel until it burns off. Other wise air got into the system while bleeding and they will need to be bled again. I don't no the proper way to bleed ABS brakes so if you have ABS maybe someone else could help with that.
Good Luck
 

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You replaced pads and rotors, but did you replace brake lines too? If you did not open the hydraulic system air could not have entered it. But, bleeding never hurts (when done properly).

You may just need some time for the pads to settle in.

Find some empty roadway to break in the brakes. Drive the car upto 35mph, then hit the brake firmly (not emergency braking, but a firm, controlled stop) and hold until the car almost stops, acceleracte upto 35mph and hit the brake again. Do this several times until the brakes are hot, some pads will even smoke. Then drive normally and let the brakes cool down. This is called "bedding in". It burns off the protective layer of oil on the rotor and finishes the mating surfaces of the rotors to the pads.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
when i mean spongy, i mean that my brake pedal seems to travel to far and meets little ressistance. before i replaced my brakes, my pedal would travel at most 2 inches and it would be rock solid and the end. now my pedal travels farther and i meet little resistance the farther i go. is there a special way to bleed ABS brakes that i'm not aware of?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
would it be necessary to bleed the back brakes as well? even though i only messed with the front?
 

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Originally posted by JasonBVHS@Jun 30 2004, 08:12 PM
would it be necessary to bleed the back brakes as well? even though i only messed with the front?
sounds like you bled them incorrectly. What kind of pads are u using?

-Damon
 

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Originally posted by JasonBVHS@Jun 30 2004, 08:12 PM
would it be necessary to bleed the back brakes as well? even though i only messed with the front?
I'm not sure about this, but typically when you bleed brakes, you bleed them all at the same time. You also have to make sure the level in the fluid doesn't drop too far, otherwise you end up sucking air into the lines.

It used to be that the front brakes were on one set of lines, and the back brakes were on the second, however I think they split them now so that the front right also does the back left and vice versa. That way if you have a leak in one system, you still have half your braking power while if it were set up the other way, a leak in the front would mean no front braking and then the rears would lock up and then the car would fishtail. Also the front's do about 70% of the braking so a leak in the front lines leads to a 70% loss of braking power while the other way, you just get a 50% loss of braking power.
 

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If you opened the hydraulic system, you should bleed the entire system. If you haven't replaced your brake fluid in 2 years, now is a good time.

Here is a good article about bleeding ABS equipped cars. Bleeding ABS systems

And generally speaking, bleed from the furthest caliper first and work your way forward. Some models look like this:

RR,LR,RF,LF

and others look like this:

RR,RF,LR,LF

basically the same, but one bleeds the rear first and then the front, while the other bleeds the furthest caliper on the rear system first and then the further caliper on the front system. Either way is fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thanks guys for the help. i thought that the front and rear were seprate from one another. thats why my brakes were for ****. i bled the back and it was full of air, now my brake pedal is back where it was before thanks. another thought would the fact that it was old brake fluid have any thing to do with it feeling somewhat spongy?
 

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Originally posted by JasonBVHS@Jul 1 2004, 03:17 PM
thanks guys for the help. i thought that the front and rear were seprate from one another. thats why my brakes were for ****. i bled the back and it was full of air, now my brake pedal is back where it was before thanks. another thought would the fact that it was old brake fluid have any thing to do with it feeling somewhat spongy?
Well the brake fluid wouldn't be the cause for it feeling weird just cause it was old. UNLESS.. it was saturated with moisture causing it to have a lower boiling point and you boiled the fluid with "enthusiastic driving" which then would cause that. :p I think most cars have it setup with one front wheel and one rear wheel diagonal from each other... so if you lose a left front brake hose or something.... you'll still have one wheel braking. That is til you run out of fluid and air is in the lines.... :ph34r:
 

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I think there's actually a divider in the brake fluid so that even if you run out of brake fluid in one set of lines, the other lines are still ok. The divider is a bit below the full mark so when you add fluid it fills both up, but if one side drops, it holds up the level for the other side.

The other good thing with flushing the brake fluid ever few years is that over time, brake fluid will absorb moisture from the air, just from opening it up and checking the level. That moisure will cause the insides of the lines to slowly rust.
 
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