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I have a 96 Ford Taurus GL. The other day while changing my rear disk brake pads I was unable to get the piston on the drivers side to rotate back into the caliper and ended up damaging the diaphragm in my attempt. I removed the caliper from my car and took it in to get it replaced, trying to plug the brake line but doing a bad job. While I was gone the brake line drained and pretty much drained the master cylinder all the way. When I returned and put everything back together on the drivers side and then jacked up the other side to finish putting pads on. The piston on this side rotated just fine but did not compress into the caliper as the manual said it would so I was unable to get the caliper to fit around the new pads... well at this point I had to go to work so I put the old pads on and put everything back together. I then filled the master cylinder and bled both sides before pulling out. Immediately I noticed a scraping noise on the drivers side... the pads on that side are scraping the rotor on the upper side of the pad but from what I can tell from driving 10 feet the brakes still stop the vehicle solid. I want to know if this scraping is simply because I have new brake pads on one side and old ones on the other, or if its possibly a more serious issue from when the master cylinder drained. My friend told me to take it on the road and drive it a little bit to get the new pads to wear down a little bit but I'm not sure if I want to take his advice as I do not want to have to replace my rotor. Also, can anybody think of a reason that the piston on the passenger side would not compress when rotated?

Thank you in advance!
Tennyson
 

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The piston might not compress because of severe corrosion, which usually comes about from not changing the brake fluid regularly. Replacing the fluid regularly not only gets rid of any moisture in the system, but you replace the corrosion inhibitors and prevent rust and pitting. You probably require a new or remanufactured caliper.

P.S. Before you try and compress the piston, remove the master cyclinder cover and remove some brake fluid. I'd keep the cap off while doing the brake job and just completely replace the brake fluid when you are done.
 

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The rear pistons screw in clockwise. You need a special tool available at AZ for rent. You can buy the infamous cube for a couple of dollars. If you do take the side with four post and grind off two of them. This works kind of OK.
 
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