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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just read the Wiki post on Brake pad bedding and rotor conditioning.
I had a few thoughts after reading them and wanted to see what others think or better yet, know from experience.

If you buy a good quality quality rotor do you really need to condition it as described in Wiki.?

I would like to think the mfg already relieved the stresses in the rotor.? Is my assumption wrong? Why not?

The article mentions bedding only semi-metalic and PFC carbon metalic pads. What about Ceramic pads?

What bedding procedures do people use, if any. I have read/heard of several. They are all similar but some are simpler than others. What is really effective?
Thanks
 

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I just read the Wiki post on Brake pad bedding and rotor conditioning.
I had a few thoughts after reading them and wanted to see what others think or better yet, know from experience.

If you buy a good quality quality rotor do you really need to condition it as described in Wiki.?

I would like to think the mfg already relieved the stresses in the rotor.? Is my assumption wrong? Why not?

The article mentions bedding only semi-metalic and PFC carbon metalic pads. What about Ceramic pads?

What bedding procedures do people use, if any. I have read/heard of several. They are all similar but some are simpler than others. What is really effective?
Thanks
Anytime you install new pads it's a good idea to bed them in over a period of time. Typically, about 100 miles. Some more some less depending on the type of brake pad you're using. This is to seat the pad to the rotor if it has any irregularities in the rotors surface, so the pad is worn in to the shape of the rotors surface.

However, the bedding in procedure as described is a little ridiculous IMO. They claim that you're transferring a bit of "transfer film" on to the rotor surface. On a brand new rotor, with the amount of heat that is generated during stopping, that happens relatively quickly. It should, in no way, take more than a few miles.

As for the juddering that they describe, the slip-grip-slip-grip action, if that actually occurs, then most likely you either have a high spot on the rotors surface, or there is contamination present (oil, grease, brake fluid, etc) and you most likely have other issues. IF you have a high spot, then the rotor needs to be turned to make it true. If there's contamination, then an inspection needs to be done to see where it came from.

IMO, the only time you really need to bed in a pad for a longer period of time is when you're simply doing a pad slap without turning the rotors. The rotors will most likely have irregularities and the pad needs to be worn in to match the existing surface. However, with as cheap as the Chinese rotors are, you should just buy new ones.

And I'm not sure why they recommend this on semi-metallics. Semi-metallic pads literally have metal shavings in them. Those shavings, in and of themselves, would remove the film that is present simply due to the metal on metal contact.

Quite honestly, unless, its a high performance rotor/pad, I would worry too much about bedding it in. As a precautionary measure, driving mildly for 100 miles, but in my experience, you should be able to drive normally without any ill effects; unless you don't give yourself adequate stopping distance and really lay in to the brakes. Then it doesn't matter how long you bed the brakes in, they will warp.
And at that point you should reassess your driving style or perhaps have your glasses/depth perception checked.

So don't worry about it too much.
 

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When you have a pulsing sensation while braking is usually blamed on rotor warping. Brakes work by the pads depositing a layer of brake pad material on the rotors. When that layer on the rotor is not even, you feel a pulse while braking. By using a good pad and performing rotor seasoning and bedding pads procedures, you will put down an even layer on the rotors and maximize performance from your brake pads. If you have a budget to spend on your brakes, for best results spend you money on quality pads and not on drilled and slotted rotors that look cool.

Bob
 

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While that is great advice that they give, that typically applies only to high quality racing type brakes that Baer provides.
Although, the one thing that kind of has me scratching my head is this:
Baer said:
The most visible effects are that of burning the machine oils from the surface of the iron and establishing a wear pattern between the pad and rotor.
Umm...yeah, isn't that what brake cleaner is for?:rolleyes2: I don't ever put a rotor on a car without thoroughly cleaning the contact surfaces, I can guarantee with utmost certainty, that there isn't a bit of machining oil or residue left on it.
Regardless, as I mentioned before, that procedure only applies to high quality brakes like Baer or Wilwood, etc. Then yes, you definitely want to follow their instructions as the material that the rotors are made out of is different than your run of the mill rotor.

When you have a pulsing sensation while braking is usually blamed on rotor warping. Brakes work by the pads depositing a layer of brake pad material on the rotors. When that layer on the rotor is not even, you feel a pulse while braking. By using a good pad and performing rotor seasoning and bedding pads procedures, you will put down an even layer on the rotors and maximize performance from your brake pads. If you have a budget to spend on your brakes, for best results spend you money on quality pads and not on drilled and slotted rotors that look cool.

Bob
I think you're a little bit confused about what's actually going on there Bob. When you drive your vehicle and you apply the brake, the organic binder (or whatever the material is) boils, it then exposes the actual friction material, which is anything from steel to copper to brass, whatever, which makes contact with the rotor. When this occurs, that film that was supposedly applied, is literally scraped away. The "bedding" cycle happens constantly as you drive your car and use the brakes. It's not something that just happens once gradually over a period of time.

Basically, it's applied, then removed, then applied then removed and so on.


As for bedding Chinese rotors, which is what is mostly sold at retail auto parts stores such as Autozone, Advance auto parts, O'Reilly's, Auto value, etc. it's pointless except to heat cycle them so you don't warp them.
Chinese rotors are so soft that if you simply run the factory pad, you'll need to replace the rotors with every brake job.

Now if you get a factory rotor, which is a much harder material, then yes, I'd definitely recommend heat cycling and bedding, as those will actually last and during your next brake job you'll actually be able to turn them.

As for pulsations, 99% of the time it is due to warpage. I have literally turned hundreds of rotors and every single time that a car had a pulsation problem they had excessive run out which was measurable on the lathe. Typically, > than .005".

Not saying that what Baer recommends is wrong or anything, I just don't think it applies to regular cars with regular brakes.
 

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In addition to cleaning the rotors with brake cleaner do any of you guys also clean the pads with brake cleaner on the contact surfaces? I do not think this hurts the pads, but wanting to know if brake cleaner has any ill effects on pads.
 

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I have used the procedures posted on all my cars and they work fine. I use either Hawk, Performance Friction Carbon Metallic or OEM Pads. I have used the cheapest rotors I can find, cryo treated OEM rotors, to custom made 2 piece rotors on my car and season them all. I have never had any problems with my brakes such as premature uneven wear or pulsing in the rotors. My cryo treated rotors with PFCM pads survived two pad changes on my car, then installed on my brother's SHO and survive another two pad changes.
I can only count on my experiences and brake engineers who write articles say.

Bob
 

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Just drive it......
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
After reading these posts and doing some thinking I agree. Just drive it.
If rotors require a stress relieving process in addition to what should be done at the factory I will suggest the factory is not doing its job.
Don't buy those rotors.
 

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After reading these posts and doing some thinking I agree. Just drive it.
If rotors require a stress relieving process in addition to what should be done at the factory I will suggest the factory is not doing its job.
Don't buy those rotors.
No factory stress relieves the rotors and done on the car.

Bob
 
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