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It's getting damn cold up here in Canada, -26 celsius with wind chill BRRRRR! My 97 Taurus has a block heater on it but I have never needed to use it until now. Even with a new battery( 1 yr old ) it sometimes takes 2 or 3 trys to get my car going. Has anyone here used their Block Heater and if so was the start up easier?
 

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Originally posted by calvin@Jan 10 2004, 06:44 PM
It's getting damn cold up here in Canada, -26 celsius with wind chill BRRRRR! My 97 Taurus has a block heater on it but I have never needed to use it until now. Even with a new battery( 1 yr old ) it sometimes takes 2 or 3 trys to get my car going. Has anyone here used their Block Heater and if so was the start up easier?
Most of then wouldn't know because block heaters only came on Canadian bulls. You should have seen them at Norwalk trying to figure out what it was.

But the block heater won't do alot of good. I think at least on my vulcan it is the fuel that is the problem. In the real cold weather it doesn't seem to hold the fuel presure.

The best thing to do is try it out and if still is hard to start cycle the key on and off a couple times before starting.
 

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Being in Hamilton I wouldn't worry about being that cold for long, now if you were up here in Ottawa you should worry.

Just kidding, I used to use the block heater on my 90 Sable often in northern Alberta and things worked fine. Haven't used it at all on my 90 Taurus here yet (third year now). I also agree with Patrick about cycling the key.
Good luck, it will be April soon.
 

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I cannot wait for winter to be over. I also suggest letting the fuel pump prime before attempting to start. I do this always, weather its -20 or 85 out side.

My dads Diesel truck (1999 Ford F-250 Super Duty) uses one, even down here in Georgia we plug it in anytime the temp dips below freezing. It starts MUCH easier when we do plug it in, but thats a diesel and they are notorious for poor cold weather starts.
 

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Originally posted by johntaurus@Jan 12 2004, 03:06 PM
I cannot wait for winter to be over. I also suggest letting the fuel pump prime before attempting to start. I do this always, weather its -20 or 85 out side.

My dads Diesel truck (1999 Ford F-250 Super Duty) uses one, even down here in Georgia we plug it in anytime the temp dips below freezing. It starts MUCH easier when we do plug it in, but thats a diesel and they are notorious for poor cold weather starts.
Diesel block heaters heat the oil I think. Gas engines only heat the coolant. That is why they aren't very effective.
 

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Originally posted by Patrick Norris+Jan 12 2004, 09:18 PM-->QUOTE (Patrick Norris @ Jan 12 2004, 09:18 PM)
<!--QuoteBegin-johntaurus
@Jan 12 2004, 03:06 PM
I cannot wait for winter to be over. I also suggest letting the fuel pump prime before attempting to start. I do this always, weather its -20 or 85 out side.

My dads Diesel truck (1999 Ford F-250 Super Duty) uses one, even down here in Georgia we plug it in anytime the temp dips below freezing. It starts MUCH easier when we do plug it in, but thats a diesel and they are notorious for poor cold weather starts.
Diesel block heaters heat the oil I think. Gas engines only heat the coolant. That is why they aren't very effective. [/b]
Diesels also have glow plugs to heat the air coming into the motor, right?
 

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Originally posted by Majisto+Jan 14 2004, 09:09 PM-->QUOTE (Majisto @ Jan 14 2004, 09:09 PM)
Originally posted by Patrick [email protected] 12 2004, 09:18 PM
<!--QuoteBegin-johntaurus
@Jan 12 2004, 03:06 PM
I cannot wait for winter to be over. I also suggest letting the fuel pump prime before attempting to start. I do this always, weather its -20 or 85 out side.

My dads Diesel truck (1999 Ford F-250 Super Duty) uses one, even down here in Georgia we plug it in anytime the temp dips below freezing. It starts MUCH easier when we do plug it in, but thats a diesel and they are notorious for poor cold weather starts.

Diesel block heaters heat the oil I think. Gas engines only heat the coolant. That is why they aren't very effective.
Diesels also have glow plugs to heat the air coming into the motor, right? [/b]
Glow plugs don't work in the winter. You still need the block heater. Diesel machinery usually doesn't have glow plugs and if you plug them in they start right up in sub zero temps.
 
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