Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

121 - 139 of 139 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
853 Posts
But, still, it was leaner and fitter, and when Ford designed it, that had the best of Japan and Europe in mind. They wanted to make something that would stop the Japs from plowing through the market, by offering such innovations as cupholders and the whatnot. Yes, a bench seat and woodgrain was available, but that only was so it would appeal to both demographics. Traditional american car buyers could get it with a bench seat and the column shift, but import buyers can spec it up with cupholders, consoles, and bucket seats.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,065 Posts
What the hell is so "sporty" about a console anyway? What benefit is there to having it in an automatic?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
Ummmm............. you don't slide into the passenger seat when you turn a corner at full speed? :p
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,022 Posts
<div class='quotemain'>
<div class='quotemain'>

It went out of style when people suddenly liked sadomasochism with their stiff seats, stiff suspension, and letting the computer control everything.
[/b]
And you know what car did that? Yeah, the Taurus. The Taurus is what car that made the american cars into sporty cars instead of road pillows.
[/b][/quote]

Im not so sure about that. I mean, take a look at the first gen sable and taurus, even then i dont know if it was sporty.

they conformed to that idea later with the SHO.

and as far as ride, besides my vehicle, all of the vehicles we own have been made within the last 10 years...and mine definetely takes the cake in smooth ride and comfortable interior...and its almost 18 years old.

but the pillow ride cars....we owned a Plymouth Fifth Avenue...it had the velvet pillow seats, and to be honest....i think they just make you feel tired and lazy. [/b][/quote]

In 1986 the Taurus was VERY sporty when compared to its contemporaries.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
As far I know, Ford tested five types of suspensions before deciding to fit them into the Taurus, of course, letting the public choose through surveys. But the Taurus was known to be a very sporty car compared to the other American cars. It was no Miata, but the fact that it was sporty and fun to drive was a major selling point against the imports.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
i really dont know about that

depends on how we're looking at suspension.
if you take a look at the motor trend car of the year
yes, the taurus took first place
but if we're looking at suspension

the mercury sable outranked every vehicle in slalom
in fact, the taurus was out ranked
not only by the sable
but the Tornado and Le Sabre
it was a family sedan (or yuppie) that offered the ride of a boat
with amazing control and a lower Cd.

and as far as design
the sable had been considered the car with the most euro flash in its debut
it was basic flare with a designer feel
at a more affordable price which attracted people who already had a euro style car

the taurus, at least to me, kept the more traditional american look
with a slight european taste and feel

the sport look was finally introduced by the SHO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I miss my bench seat/column shift... even though i only drove it for a week before it died lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
1987 Taurus L Sedan- cool :ford:


I really hate floor shifts in true American cars :eek: :rolleyes:

TaurusSpirit wrote:
To answer where they went, floor shifters are SO much cheaper to do. The trans is right there, no extra linkage needed like a column shifter. Same with lever rather than pedal parking brakes.[/b]
You're damn right :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
853 Posts
1987 Taurus L Sedan- cool :ford:


I really hate floor shifts in true American cars :eek: :rolleyes:

TaurusSpirit wrote:
To answer where they went, floor shifters are SO much cheaper to do. The trans is right there, no extra linkage needed like a column shifter. Same with lever rather than pedal parking brakes.[/b]
You're damn right :rolleyes:
[/b]
Isn't that the rare "aircraft" armrest?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,922 Posts
No, it's the "Flightbench" seat.






Oh, and here's another thing that bugs me. What is it with new cars and their use of import style ignition switches? They lack the collar with the tabs. Some of the new cars that have the keyfob built into the key, I feel like I'm gonna break it when I crank the car. And on some cars, the key head doesn't have a big enough grip to turn the ignition without a collar. And what's the deal with the power windows not working in the ACC position on these cars?!
 

·
Former Moderpony
Joined
·
1,215 Posts
A little more on the Fiero:

The Fiero was originally going to be a sports car, like the Porsche 914 or Fiat/Bertone X1/9. However, in the seventies there was that whole gas crisis thing, something about gas prices going up to $0.45 :rofl2: . GM's management didn't want another sports car in their lineup, because in their mind sports car=gas guzzler. So the team tried again, pitching the Fiero as a fuel efficient commuter car. It worked.

The engine they wanted was the 1.8 liter OHC 4. GM management cheaped out though and put in the craptastic "Iron Duke" 2.5 liter. That engine produced a whopping 92 horsepower. It also blew up anytime you tried to get more power out of it (Ask any Fiero owner who bought an aftermarket turbocharger made for the Fiero). It did however get very good gas mileage, and that's about the only positive thing you can say about that engine.

Now when the Fiero debuted in 1984 it was a decently quick car. However, most Fiero owners were still dissappointed with it. Thus the GT model was born in 1985. It featured the 2.8 liter V6, which produced 145 hp and was also available in the 6000 STE. It also featured the same bodywork as the Indy pace car Fiero.

In 1986 the Fiero GT got a new look. There was glass added behind the rear windows, new taillights and a few other touches. The old GT became the SE.

In 1987 the Fiero Coupe' lost the "Bumperpads" in favor of a more aerodynamic front and rear end.

1988 saw a multitude of changes. All models got new suspension, replacing parts borrowed from the X bodies. A factory installed "T Top" roof became optional. A new model called the Formula debuted, featuring the running gear of the GT, in the lighter Fiero Coupe' body.

Electronic power steering was going to be included with all 1988 Fieros, but they could not make enough for each and it was going to be delayed until 1989. A few '88 Fieros actually did get the power steering.

The first year Fieros did have a fire problem due to a faulty part that GM was to cheap to replace. They were eventually forced to recall all 2.5 Fieros. The fire problem was blown a bit out of proportion though, much like the Ford fires have been.

For the record I like my 1987 Fiero's interior. It's also a blast to drive on curvy little roads. It's like a go-kart for the street.

A 1984 Coupe'


A very nice GT



-Dschinghis Kahn
Fiero owner


Did you know: The original idea for a mid engined sports car for Pontiac came from John Delorean.

Oh and the Fiero made a profit every year it sold. Sales were declining though (which is usually considered normal when a model starts getting older). GM officially killed it because "The market for a two seater sports car was shrinking" (the same bs they piled on us when the killed all plans for a new minivan). Then of course came the Miata.

I'm convinced that there is no company as incompetent as GM was in the 80's and 90's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
No, it's the "Flightbench" seat.






Oh, and here's another thing that bugs me. What is it with new cars and their use of import style ignition switches? They lack the collar with the tabs. Some of the new cars that have the keyfob built into the key, I feel like I'm gonna break it when I crank the car. And on some cars, the key head doesn't have a big enough grip to turn the ignition without a collar. And what's the deal with the power windows not working in the ACC position on these cars?!
[/b]

Automakers do crazy things and I don't know why. For example

1. On the new Taurus the "tilt steering" is not the usual lever on the left side of the column but a drop down lever on the underside of the column just like Honda/Toyota. The problem with this system is that there's so little adjustment offered it's laughable. DUMB

2. My Infiniti has no dome light switch. To turn on all the interior lights you have to open a door. The interior lights can be individually turned on/off, though. DUMB

3. Why can't you turn off the dome light of most American cars when a door is open. And why do most American cars incorporate the dome light switch as part of the instrument dimmer? DUMB AND DUMB

4. My Infiniti has a door ajar light on the dash as do many other cars. The trunk-open indicator is a little different. A message pops up on the Nav screen in the centre of the dash but only when the car is underway. DUMB

5. Ford's auto parking brake release only works when the gear selected is taken out of reverse. DUMB

6. Power windows not working in the ACC position. DUMB

7. Why do some cars have the trunk release button inside the glovebox. DUMB

8. The 12V power outlets in my Jag are powered with the ignition switch is "ON". They don't work in OFF or ACC. DUMB

9. Why can't I eject a CD from my SHO when the ignition is off? I can eject one of those old-fashioned cassette tape thingies when the ignition is off. DUMB
Regarding ignition keys - my Infiniti has the best system ever. Leave the keyfob in your pocket and start the car with the push of a dashboard button. Easy and simple. Regarding the "ears" on the ignition switch - these are not really needed anymore. In days of old the ignition switch switched a lot of high current circuits which meant that the switch had to be heavy duty which made it hard to turn without the ears. These days ignition switches generally switch low-power-consuming relays so the switch doesn't have to be as "meaty" as cars of old and they are require much less force to turn. Even without the ears it's extremely rare these days that a key breaks inside the switch cylinder.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,065 Posts
7. Why do some cars have the trunk release button inside the glovebox. DUMB
[/b]
I think the reasoning behind that was so you can keep people out of the trunk if they break into the cabin. Back when cars had locking gloveboxes (whatever happened to those?) you could lock the glovebox and keep thieves from getting easy access to the trunk. Basically the same thing they did with the Gen I/II sedans where you could lock the release lever.

Another part of that was so someone couldn't insert something through a slightly open window to push the switch. I know the Fieros (here we go again) had the trunk/engine compartment release button high up on the dash and it supposedly is possible to do it that way. I've seen them modified so you have to hold down the defrost button and push the trunk button at the same time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Oh, and here's another thing that bugs me. What is it with new cars and their use of import style ignition switches?
And what's the deal with the power windows not working in the ACC position on these cars?!
[/b]
They're not import-style, they're going back to the way ignition switches were made for decades.

Since the dawn of man, the ignition switch was in the dashboard. Unfortunately, thieves became very comfortable with the techniques for stealing cars. To combat this, car makers moved the ignition switch to the steering column and added those little collars to help you find the keyhole (since you could no longer see it). It took thieves approximately 37 seconds to figure out how to steal cars with this new ignition switch, but it soldiered on for 2-3 decades.

Recently, with the chips in the keys making it difficult for casual thieves to steal cars and recognizing the failure of the steering column-mounted ignition switch, car makers have decided to let us see where we're sticking the key and put it back on the dash.

To put it another way, the ignition switch for my 1966 Chrysler and 2006 Dodge are in the same place and function the same way, and in both cars the radio and accessories DO work when you put the key in the ACC position. The acc position is different on both cars - on the Chrysler it was to the left (opposite the direction of start) and on the Dodge it's to the right between off and start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
<div class='quotemain'>
7. Why do some cars have the trunk release button inside the glovebox. DUMB
[/b]
I think the reasoning behind that was so you can keep people out of the trunk if they break into the cabin. Back when cars had locking gloveboxes (whatever happened to those?) you could lock the glovebox and keep thieves from getting easy access to the trunk. Basically the same thing they did with the Gen I/II sedans where you could lock the release lever.

Another part of that was so someone couldn't insert something through a slightly open window to push the switch. I know the Fieros (here we go again) had the trunk/engine compartment release button high up on the dash and it supposedly is possible to do it that way. I've seen them modified so you have to hold down the defrost button and push the trunk button at the same time.
[/b][/quote]


If that's why they put the switch in the glove box... why did they make my wagon where i have to turn on the ignition for the tailgate release lever to work? Or do i just have some defect? lol
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,800 Posts
I'm actually sort of casually looking for an '88 Fiero GT. It's gotta be an '88 for the bespoke suspension, plus the V6 with the Getrag 5-speed.

Fieros are sweet. B) ANd the don't have bench seats OR column shifters. :p
 
121 - 139 of 139 Posts
Top