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2014 Ford Taurus SEL
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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
What was the code? Most of the time an O2 code DOES NOT mean the sensor itself is bad. The code is telling you that there is a problem with the air/fuel ratio, which is due to vacuum leaks, low fuel pressure, etc, etc.
Y"all Have helped me out so much I can't thank you enough. I am hoping it's NOT a catalytic converter...
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I did end up replacing the spark plugs, and the O2 sensor (bank 2 sensor 1) and it did help with the harsh idle, as well as the misfire I was feeling... HOWEVER now that both of them are changed I do notice a difference as far as what I thought was a misfire.. BUT now when I'm going up a hill or just driving in general I do have that "running out of gas" shudder, skipping feeling, where I feel like I almost have to Butterfly the gas pedal, so I've made an appointment to have my car checked out at a shop. I'm hoping it isn't a catalytic converter.
 

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One thing I'll add to all of this is the following. A lot of possible causes of what you're experiencing are very easy to check, but you need the tools to do it. Not to beat a dead horse, but you really should get a scan tool because it will help a lot in narrowing down problems. You can read fuel line pressure, vacuum levels and hundreds of other things. Even if by using a scan tool you discover something that you can't fix (either because you don't have the tools or you don't feel confident enough to take a stab at it), at least you'll know what the problem is so that you don't get ripped off by a mechanic.
 

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Never thought about that. Do I check it the same way I check my oil
Similar, but not exactly. You need to bring the car up to operating temperature first. Then you need to loosen the hose clamp that secures the air intake tube to the throttle body. Don't remove the intake - just loosen it. Then disconnect the airbox, so that you can rotate the air intake tube enough to be able to reach the dipstick on the transmission. When rotating the tube, be careful not to put tension on the wires that connect the mass airflow sensor, nor to put stress on the PCV tube. You just want create a few inches of space to be able to get your hand on the transmission filler cap (which incorporates the dipstick). Then, with the engine still running, check the dipstick just like you do with an oil dipstick. I can do this on my Taurus without moving the intake tube, but I don't mind scraped and skinned knuckles. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
One thing I'll add to all of this is the following. A lot of possible causes of what you're experiencing are very easy to check, but you need the tools to do it. Not to beat a dead horse, but you really should get a scan tool because it will help a lot in narrowing down problems. You can read fuel line pressure, vacuum levels and hundreds of other things. Even if by using a scan tool you discover something that you can't fix (either because you don't have the tools or you don't feel confident enough to take a stab at it), at least you'll know what the problem is so that you don't get ripped off by a mechanic.
True the scan tool I borrowed from a friend is nice but I don't understand how to use it so I normally have him check it for me. And I try to do what I can but like you said you need the correct tools to do so. From what I'm experiencing I think it's just going to be process of elimination but I do feel confident that I'm headed the right direction with the code that I did have I just wish it was something I could figure out myself . But I've learned so much just from the advice I've gotten from this page.
 

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Never thought about that. Do I check it the same way I check my oil
Here's how the Ford service manual describes it:

Start the engine and let it run for 3 minutes. Move the range selector lever into each gear position and allow engagement for a minimum of ten seconds. Check the transmission fluid level by installing and removing the transmission fluid level indicator. When installing the transmission fluid level indicator, be sure it is seated and rotate it clockwise to the locked position. Adjust the transmission fluid level.

Font Rectangle Parallel Electric blue Diagram


1) Correct transmission fluid level at normal operating temperature 82°C-93°C (180°F-200°F).
2) Low transmission fluid level.
3) High transmission fluid level.

Also, check not only the level, but the quality of the fluid. Smell it to determine whether it smells burnt (if so, drain and replace). Rub a couple of drops of it between your fingertips to see whether it feels gritty (if so, drain and replace, and thoroughly wash it off of your finger afterward!). Also look at it closely for metal flakes, which will look like powdered metal or sometimes like fish skin (if there are signs of metal, drain and replace, but you cloud have other problems in the transmission). Look at the color of it (if it's a dark crimson or brown color, drain and replace).
 

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If you do decide to go the plug route as maintenance, my two cents are on the NGK Ruthenium plugs.
Since the one upstream 02 totally dumped out to throw a code, I would do the other upstream as well (they were installed same time probably so it's on deaths door) along with the plugs.
02 sensors will run like crap for a long time, heat up slow, respond slow without throwing a code. Normally only upstreams will have issues, downstreams only check for a difference and are protected on other side of cat from unburned junk. Only when it's totally junk it will throw that code, after miles of killing your performance and mileage.
Maybe check your throttle body for a black ring of **** around the plate that might cause a rougher idle too while stopped or at a light, but not an out of gas feeling.
 
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