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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, working on putting the reverse assembly together. I tried to use the sheet protector trick that egiroux described in his post, but without success.

The problem I have seems to be coming from the fact that the outer seal lips wants to "raise up" as I push the piston down. If I tilt the piston a little one side goes down, but then I cannot move the other side.

I have oiled the sheet protector, the piston outer seal, I have tried to push down evenly, ...

What am I missing? Thank you for any help.
 

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The sheet protector cannot overlap, the clearances are too tight. Also, I used grease to lube the seals before installing. It will go very easily. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for your help. I am not sure when I can try again, but I am curious, so I may try it tonight if I can steal some time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I will try it, as it overlapped in one place. I also used the thinnest sheet I could find. The problem I saw was from the fact that the outer seal lip was almost a little too wide and wanted to raise up, but I will try tonight and report. Thanks again for your time and your help.

The job would not be so bad if I did not have to do it a little bit at time, and mostly at 2AM!!
 

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I don't know how these things can be rebuilt in a few hours without taking shortcuts(like not replacing all the seals, etc.). It's either lots of experience or only replacing the parts that failed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was able to take a few minutes at lunch to try and I got it to work. My problem was that the plastic sheet was too thin and did not push the seal lip enough, so it would not clear the outside "cylinder". I used a piece of "mylar-like" platic sheet and it worked great (also made sure it was not overlapped).

Now, I will have to fight the snap ring for the return springs and find a way to put them on (why do they not have holes!!).

I agree with you 100% about it taking time. I think most shops will just replace the part that creates the problem, leaving many sub-assemblies untouched.

I enjoy the process, it is just hard to find time to do it (but that is good, means there is a lot of work).
 

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If you want the rings to go on easily use 2 people and 3 flat screwdrivers. One at each end and one in the middle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I thought about and even gave it a quick try by myself, but I don't have the option of having someone else. I will try some snap ring pliers with knurled flat ends and see what happens.
 

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I did one of them by myself. Since it was in a vise, I tied a string to a screwdriver,ran it down to the ground, stepped on it, and manipulated the third screwdriver with my knee. No, I'm not kidding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well I found my lock ring pliers and they worked great, took less than a minute. Congratulations on your ingenuity! Now if only I could have a little more time to get to another assembly, but work is calling...

Thanks again for your help, it is very much appreciated.
 

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ok there are a few tricks that are used in the field. the first one that is not typically recommended is going around the seal with a feeler gauge to get it to go down but they like to also cut the seal. the next is to not use grease but to instead use trans fluid, grease takes up too much space compared to trans fluid. you can buy special kits that contain seal protectors for your application and work great! also there are special snapring pliers for those type of snaprings.

hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
These are the kind of pliers I used, they are actually called lock ring pliers:

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00947386000P?prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1

(I do not have the Sears one, this is just the first illustration I could find).

Thank you Vash. I thought about getting the lip protectors as I do not mind getting some special tool so I can save time, but on this one I wanted to try first without them (there is one for one of the piston at $150, so I wanted to avoid it). With the right thickness and sturdiness of material, it does take 30 seconds. So if the sheet protector does not work for someone, try those 'mylar' sheets.

Thank you again to all who have replied.
 

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that could be what they are im not sure of the "technical" name i just know they work really good and a good variety helps alot. the ones we have at school are like the ones in the link in shape and have a crosshatch area for grip with a divet to help keep the ring on the pliers during instal.
 
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