Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello.

Well, this has been going on for a long time now, but I just thought I would ask you all whether you have a problem with your brakes squeeking or not. Nearly every time I break without using too much force, an awful squeek occurs, and I'm fairly sure that it's the breaks. Has anyone else had this problem? If so, how did you fix it (if you did)?


Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
You need to check those pads, before it starts to damage the rotors/drums. Do you know what wheel is doing it more?

I'm sure its due for a brake pad change anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
In my experience, breaks "squeek" for two main reasons and one/two minor:
1. Design. When they are worn out to the limit, a metalic insert placed in the pad contacts the rotor metal and squeaks, alerting the driver. Well... at least some of them.
2. Cracked pads. They will squeak too.
3. The minor reason is cheap/bad quality brake pads. The cheap ones are not safe for anything but light driving and usually they make also a lot of "dust" on the wheels.
4. Added another one, less obvious - improper installed new pads! They need to have applied the special brake siliconic grease on the back! And don't use whatever grease you have - it gets really hot back there!

Both main cases you need to take care of the breakes. Before you hurt somebody. Or worse.
I am sorry to say, but the fact that "for a long time" you didn't bother to inspect the squeaking brakes is irresponsable. A state inspection can be done at any time for some 15$, you don't need to wait a whole year.
 

·
Cake monster
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
My front brakes squeak like crazy, mostly on light braking. The pads have lots of life left, but I'm gonna change them, it's almost unbearable with the windows down. I've pulled the calipers off and inspected everything up close, I can't find any issues and the only symptom is squeaking. I've been through a lot of cheap pads, but none have sounded this bad.

Did you check to make sure they aren't worn down?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,415 Posts
I'm having the same issue with the ceramic pads from NAPA. they appear to have plenty of life left, but they sure do squeal when braking at times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
I'm having the same issue with the ceramic pads from NAPA. they appear to have plenty of life left, but they sure do squeal when braking at times.
I have used latelly only the ThermoQuiet Wagner ones (from AAP/Amazon).
I used to buy the "Silver" or "Gold" ones but they whare not good for my braking style and left tones of dust on the rims.

Newer had a sqeak from new thou. I did installed them ALWAYS with brake siliconic vaseline on back. Quote from below:
How To Change Your Brake Pads - Edmunds.com
Install the new rotor, if necessary. Remove the old brake pads from the caliper (usually held in place by several clips), but, before putting on the new ones, you must do something. Remember the little packets of grease you bought? These are used to lubricate the brake pads. Careful now -- not on the front of the pad, which comes in contact with the rotor, but on the back. The pads attach to the caliper via a plate-and-clip arrangement. The lubricant goes between the plate and the back of the brake pad. Got it?
Don't overlook this. If you don't do it, you'll get a horrible screeching sound every time you apply the brakes, like a dinosaur in heat (and you know how horny those velociraptors used to get). After you apply the grease, attach the pad to the plate and slide the whole thing into place.
So I guess I missed a point up there, I'll add it now - improper pads install :p
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,415 Posts
:lol: Jay...seeing that movie once, was enough for me.

Never put grease or nothing on mine...hmmm...that would be the noise probably.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
In my experience, breaks "squeek" for two main reasons and one/two minor:
1. Design. When they are worn out to the limit, a metalic insert placed in the pad contacts the rotor metal and squeaks, alerting the driver. Well... at least some of them.
2. Cracked pads. They will squeak too.
3. The minor reason is cheap/bad quality brake pads. The cheap ones are not safe for anything but light driving and usually they make also a lot of "dust" on the wheels.
4. Added another one, less obvious - improper installed new pads! They need to have applied the special brake siliconic grease on the back! And don't use whatever grease you have - it gets really hot back there!

Both main cases you need to take care of the breakes. Before you hurt somebody. Or worse.
I am sorry to say, but the fact that "for a long time" you didn't bother to inspect the squeaking brakes is irresponsable. A state inspection can be done at any time for some 15$, you don't need to wait a whole year.
This pretty much sums it up.

What some mechanics do to cheap brake pads, is grind the sides of the pads in an angled way and make a line in the middle of the pad. If they are ceramic brake pads, they can cause it to squeal. I had a pair from Autoparts that use to squeal like crazy, worse part is I used them up in like 6 months (15K KM)...

Also always grease the side of the pads that go inside the shims (never greased the back of the pads, seems a little bit of a waste of grease imo.) Also pull out those guide pins, clean them, polish them, get as much of the old grease out and if you have a small metal brush that can go inside the caliper area where the guide pins slide, polish in there too. Once everything is rust free, put new grease on the guide pins, stick it back in, make sure everything slides nice and free. Reinstall everything, grind/polish the hub a little, clean everything with brake cleaner, then apply grease on the hub. (This is really just to stop rust, and making the wheel come out easier when you take off the tire) Install tire.

Thats pretty much how we did brakes at the garage I worked at.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
Also always grease the side of the pads that go inside the shims...
Correct, clean and grease those slinding points too, so the pads don't rub on discs!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top