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Discussion Starter #1
2005 3.0 DOHC.
I recently did some major work on the engine, but during that work I managed to damage the fuel rail pressure sensor.
Due to the high price Ford was asking I took the chance and bought an aftermarket one for under $20.
As you may have guessed, within a week or so the car started stalling, with the obvious sign of fuel starvation and I was getting a code P0193, fuel pressure sensor circuit high, along with the expected both banks running lean.
Hooked up the FORScan and it showed the fuel pressure percentage would jump from about 10% to 75%, and I would get the occasional fuel sensor fault spike while watching the scope.
Took the aftermarket sensor out and was surprised to see a small piece of black plastic partially blocking the small hole into the sensor leading to the pressure transducer.
Pulled it out (it was tiny) and it had the consistency of silicone RTV, but I had never used silicone anywhere on this engine.
Looking down into the fuel rail opening, I saw some more of this black 'plastic'. I removed the fuel inlet at the quick disconnect and using a pipe cleaner tried to get the plastic out so I could see what it was, but no luck. Ended up using air to blow the plastic out of the fuel rail and a quick pump prime to flush the fuel line.
I had changed the fuel filter during the engine repairs so it wasn't that.
It's a mystery, and I thought I'd post this in case anyone else is having an intermittent 'tear your hair out' P0193 code, or if anyone had found this problem in the past and can identify the 'plastic'.
 

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Good troubleshooting!

For critical parts like the FPS, DPFE, TPS, ECT, IAT, etc, I spend the $$ and get either the Motorcraft part or a high quality aftermarket part like BWD, Standard Motor products, AC Delco Professional series, etc. I have been bitten by cheap junk aftermarket parts enough times over the last 49 years of owning quite a few cars (even when I was a poor college student I always owned at least 2 or 3 old cars plus a bike or 2) that I have finally learned my lesson to buy quality parts the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
True, but in this case the aftermarket sensor was fine, and had I gone to the trouble and expense of fitting a genuine part it would probably still have failed by getting blocked.
The other problem is that many genuine parts are made overseas and are junk, despite the "Genuine part" on the box. For example;
 

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In theory, name brand parts need to meet the manufacturers specs, while no name parts may not (Dorman junk comes to mind). In practice, quality control these days is pretty much nonexistent in many industries.
 
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