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I think dropping the subframe would be easiest, and i am not sure if there is a way around it.

The alternator removal of the Vulcan is much easier.
 

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It can come out without moving the subframe. With the front jacked up and the wheels hanging, remove the plastic inner fender cover and unbolt the alternator. Carefully drop it and rotate it 180 degrees, then inch it out between the body and axle. Be careful not to damage the crank sensor, which sits below the alternator. Remember to put the top two bolts back in the alternator before putting it back in the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Okay thanks very much for your replies.

I'd like to ask if i may, is it important to just have the front jacked up with the wheels hanging,does this give it more clearence to remove alternator?
or can I run the car up on front wheel ramps and still access the alternator?
Thanks for your help
 

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Okay thanks very much for your replies.

I'd like to ask if i may, is it important to just have the front jacked up with the wheels hanging,does this give it more clearence to remove alternator?
or can I run the car up on front wheel ramps and still access the alternator?
Thanks for your help
You need to pull the right front wheel off and remove the plastic inner fender liner to have the easiest time doing this.
 

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I just did this job on '99 Sable.
The link in the original post is the same link that is in the topic finder.
That link is broken.
So I will post some helpful thoughts here.
First it is not as bad as people say.
It comes out without having to drop the subfrome or pulling the axel.

Use the rag method to remove/replace the serpintine belt, search these boards for the method.
Works like a charm no busted knuckles.

Get the upper two "stud bolts" first this way the car isn't jacked, making it a long reach into the engine compartment.
There is not enough space to fit a deep well socket and ratchet handle bewteen the fender well and the bolt.
My solution was to not press the socket onto the ratchet all the way.
This let the socket clear the stud on the bolt and reach the head.
The head of these "stud bolts" is not tall, they are very thin, with rounded corners.
A 12 point socket will not get enough purchase to turn the bolt.
I used 6 point sockets and all was well.
While I could fit a normal ratchet handle in there, there was no room to turn it.
I used a ratchet with a short throw and a handle that bent.
Like these

The front top bolt came out and was removed.
The rear bolt, towards the firewall, has a bracket on it that holds the powersteering pump line.
Take the nut off the stud and you can move the bracket off the end and over the stud.
This takes some effort.
Then you can get the socket on there to loosen the "stud bolt".
This bolt is to long to remove until the alternator is out of the car.

As Dan said remove the tire and plastic insterts from the wheel well.
You can look right in and see the bottom bolt.
It is a little hard to get a ratchet on and turn it but, nothing compared to the top bolts.
Once the bottom bolt was out I could diconnect the electric from the back.
One set clipped in, one wire bolted down.
Here is what it looks like this will help in picturing it coming out

At this point with the alternator lower then were it was bolted in, you can turn the whole thing around so the pulley is facing the engine.
When in the right spot it turns easily.
Someone said taking it out is like walking a couch around a corner\through a door.
Which makes sense.
Put the legs through the door first then the couch, then angle the couch so the back legs come through the door.
When you look at this alternator the offsets on the back are the legs of the couch.
With the pulley facing the motor bring the first leg under the wheel well in front of the strut.
Now the pulley is facing down and one leg is clear.
Slide the alternator out until the rear leg hits the wheel well.
(someone said they ripped there CV boot doing this, that must have been frustration because it comes out easy)
Rotate the alternator up, so the pulley now faces out and the other leg is free.
Remember what WJC said and put the bolt back in before you get it back in place and start to swear.;)

Getting the alternator out was the easy part.
Those top bolts were a real SOB.
Hope this helps others who have read the horror stories.

The issue with my alternator was, a brush had disintergrated.
$8 bucks for a new set and I was on the road.
Cheers!
 

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Glad it helped.
 

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Success feels good!
 

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I've got my alternator about halfway out (had to quit due to darkness). Thanks for all the helpful tips compiled by The Hound. Absent those I would not have even tried this, the horror stories were so bad. When the serpentine came off I knew I was down the rabbit hole.

So far the toughest thing has been getting at the 18mm stud/nut, which on my car is the forward-most of the two top fasteners. The power steering clamp that fits atop it was a hassle -- I was bouncing the aluminum line pretty good to get that rascal out of the way. I was worried I would have a breach and eventually get PS fluid pouring into my newly-installed alternator. Time will tell, but it seems OK for now.

On the 18mm nut itself a box end wrench worked just fine, which was a relief because I didn't have a ratchet/socket combo I could get in there. The rear one (13mm) just required a good deal of leverage and patience.

Car is raised, wheel is off, as is about half of the splash guard. If the whole mess hasn't toppled over come morning I'll know it's safe to work beneath. Rain is expected, so that should speed things along . . .

Thanks again. Update soon.
 

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You're welcome, yes a box end could work but, that's a whole lot of quarter turns slipping the wrench on and off each turn.
A few beers too, I would imagine.

After rereading my post one more thing came to mind.
When you have the alternator free and are turning it so the pulley faces the motor.
It only turns 180 in one direction and it turns real easy.
So if it's not going one direction try the other.
Cheers!
 

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Success. Big hands are an advantage in many situations, but this is not one of them.

As others have mentioned, it was akin to childbirth: there was blood, there was swearing, but everyone was happy in the end.

The electrical connectors were difficult for me to deal with once I had the unit loose. I couldn't even tell what the smaller one was. After fumbling around for a few minutes I opted to disconnect the negative lead at the Mega Fuse and pull it out still attached to the alternator. Then I attached it to the new unit prior to install. This, I think, was far easier than dealing with that connector twice under the car. And it also reminded me to send the top bolts in with the alternator.

Installation was comparatively easy. As Hound suggested, if it's really difficult you're doing it wrong.

Thanks again, everybody.

- - - rang(l)er
 

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Don't worry, it gets easyer every time. I have to replace my alternator twice - second time my window washer fluid hose broke off (old) and squirted fluid exactly on to the alternator. Short circuit that followed melted that sucker.
 

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I am replacing an alternator on a 24 valve OHC '99 Taurus. I read "The Hounds" message about rotating the alternator so the pulley faces the back and will give that a try. Has anyone removed the vibration damper to get more space? (34 mm, left-hand thread).

Speaking of bolts, I don't think I have ever run into an 18 mm bolt before. It's one of the top two. In order to get that baby off I has to use a deep well and a vice grips. I've worked on a lot of engines in my life -- I don't like this one!
 

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For some reason Ford loves the very uncommon in the rest of the universe 18mm size for lots of fasteners. I have bought several 18 mm wrenches, sockets, impact sockets, swivel sockets etc separately just so I can work on Fords.
 
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