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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title says. Driving up to an intersection, short yellow, had to get on the brakes of my 1999 dohc sedan. Pedal to the floor. Rolled thru. No accident, fortunately. Limped home and checked it out. Rear line ruptured about two feet forward of the splitter block. W/out lifting the car it looks like the line runs above the exhaust (it looks like the exhaust is in the way).

How much of a pita (pain in the...) is this job?
What are the likely problem areas?
Should I replace a section - w/ a compression fitting - or go master to block?
How much would it cost to have it done at a garage?
Anything else you consider worth mentioning?

Thanks for the assistance.
 

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Compression fittings are a huge NO NO!!!! You could cut out the bad section and flare each end and use a proper union to join both flared ends together. Compression fittings are a safety risk, you do not want to risk your family loosing brakes again, not to mention if you have annual vehicle inspections it would fail automatically. At least they're suppose too. Anyhew as for replacing the lines either buy a roll of brake line and flare the ends yourself if you have the tools. If not measure out the length you will need and buy the pre-flared lines. They come in different lengths. Then you will only need to buy the unions to join the lines together. Don't know what the garage will charge for labor, depends on how far they go with it and how bad the rest of the line is. Look over the lines and see how bad the rest are and determine what you want to do.
 

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We use compression fitting for shop air that goes up to 100 psi. Anything above we use flared joints. Brakes go pretty high, several hundred psi easy afaik. I gotta do the same job myself soon. Share your experience, if you do it yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'll put it up on jackstands and get under it tomorrow. If I have easy access to the length of the line I'll just do the job. Thanks for the tip on the union vs compression. I expect a flaring tool is 10 to 20 @ harbour freight. No biggie. Have a bending tool already. Was just hoping to gain some insight.

I estimate the job at 150 or so. I just need to decide if I want to do it myself.

Either way I'll post what I find out. I found almost nothing when I searched.
 

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I am in the middle of this now with my 98. I will give you my thoughts.

My 98's lines broke between the two doors. I have used compression fittings before and never had an issue. Is it safe? debatable. Heres the deal. Unless you have perfectly clean line, absolutely don't use them. If your line was anything like mine, there was NO way to find clean enough line that was not rusted or pitted short of replacing 1/2 of it.

The last time i tried to graft OEM line with fittings i found it was MUCH harder than aftermarket brake line and hard to flare.

You can get pre made sections of line with fittings on them. I did this on my Mazda truck. It would be a pain to do this on the Taurus, and you
would need to find bubble flair adapters for the ends. and bend the excess line out in some non OEM routing pattern

What i did was go to upull and found a complete line that was not totally rotted and snagged it. cost $8 and lots of cussing and labor.
the fittings are 13MM on both ends. i managed to get the back ones off at the anti dive valve OK on the donor. The front ones i just cut off the
union block due to access issues and took it that way. Latter at home, i took the lines off from the union block. My car had anti lock. the non
anti lock cars may not have this block just below the master cylinder

When i snagged the used lines, i carefully pried all the plastic fasteners off the body with the lines attatched so they are positioned and can pop right back on. I also cleaned the lines off and painted them.

You have to be careful taking the lines off that you don't bend them too much or kink them. They ARE long. You will have to pull them forward
to get them from under the rear suspension arms. I hauled them in my other Taurus home and had to have the passengers front window open
to hang the lines out of because they were too long to fit inside

I managed to get mine reinstalled yesterday. i was very care trying not to strip the 13MM nuts or threads on the brake blocks. you may have
to slightly bend the line ends to get good alignment before the screw threads will take.

While i got the lines on, i was not so lucky trying to bleed the rear disks. They both had bleeder nuts rusted shut. and my caliper on the passengers
side stripped out the bleed nut threads, so now i need to get another caliper from the junk yard this week some time.

If for whatever reason you do the job yourself with raw line, pull the old lines off line i did, and use them as a template to bend your new lines off the car. your going to need two people to maneuver the lines back in to prevent bending them too much. If you doing your own bubble flairs,
practice first on scrap line until your confidence level is up to the point you trust your flares

If you are getting used lines, pay special attention to the area around a plastic cover block about 10" or so that covers the line under the drivers door. This is the area they usually rot out due to the plastic cover holding moisture and crud on the lines. If that area is severely rotted (most will have some rust) or wet (was already leaking), find another one

good luck
 

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The same topic came up last week in the Suspension-handling -brakes section.

http://www.taurusclub.com/forum/118...5760-1996-ford-taurus-brake-line-rupture.html

I would not use compression fitting unless you are really stuck. If you are, try to get steel fittings and not brass. That way you can crankdown on them harder. I know you can find 100 guys who have done it and it worked out. I have done it. But I went back a few months latter when I had the time and parts and patched in a piece with flairs.

If you buy brake lines that have the wrong flair fitting(type or diameter) for your car, you can buy adaptors at NAPA. I have never seen them at the Big Box parts stores.

Good luck with whatever way your approach it.
 

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In April, 2010, I noticed severe leaking under my '93 wagon and brake pedal to the floor. Nasty! Had to drive it to the shop with my wife out in front. Took it to my mechanic, he replaced two 3/16" brake lines, one 4' and other 6', and with union, adapter and brake fluid this cost me $247.10 before PA sales tax. Wife ok.
 

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ok guys not flamming or anything but cars (not sure which models) used to come from the factory with compression fittings to easily replace a section of line. but they have since stopped to save money. I have used compression fittings on brake lines on 2 of my cars and had no effects even years later.
 

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Brake lines are DOUBLE flared, not single flared.
I've got a double flare tool from Harbor F that I use, good enough for my DIY use.
Compression fittings will not handle the several hundred psi from a panic stop, they will blow out sooner or later.
That's why even the flared ends are doubled for the extra strength in brake line applications.
Any connectors you see OEM are flare connectors.
 
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As I noted yesterday, this happened to me with my '93 wagon in April, 2010. Went out to drive it, saw a pool of dark fluid on the pavement. Brakes did not work, so I added a bottle of brake fluid and slowly drove to the repair shop, with my wife in the other car in front of me to stop me if necessary. Job involved replacing two 3/16" brake lines, one 4' and other 6' plus union and adapter, plus more brake fluid. Total cost before PA sales tax $247.10. Mechanic told me that brake fluid is corrosive, which was reason for problem.
 
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