Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just finished replacing the cam synchronizer in my daughter’s 2000 Taurus and it was a friggen nightmare. Not so much because of the work involved, but because of the lack of detailed information I could find with explanations about the procedure. Even with a thorough tuneup, this particular vehicle still wasn’t running all that well. So when the sensor failed and threw the code, I wanted to install a new sensor and synchronizer “by the book” to make sure it was installed and working properly. Here's my version:

1. Disconnect connectors, remove air filter cover, throttle body, supports under throttle body, spark plug wires from coil and so forth. Others have covered this fine. Moving the wiring harness from over the synchronizer is a pig so take your time. I cut the tape around the plastic clamshell, opened the clamshell, pulled the wires out and kept them out of the way with a piece of wire. A couple wires were glued to the bottom of the clamshell and required some silicone to seal ripped insulation.

2. Remove the sensor, but not the synchronizer.

3. To properly set the new synchronizer, the engine has to be at top dead center (TDC). Trying to find timing marks on the crank was futile. To locate TDC, remove the spark plug from cylinder #1, which is at the back (firewall) passenger side of the engine.

4. Jack up the front passenger corner and remove the wheel. Remove the front inner fender liner. This gives you access to the crank pulley.

5. Insert a long Phillips screwdriver through the spark plug hole. I tilted the handle up to give the screwdriver as much a direct angle on the piston as possible.

6. Using a long (something that will clear the fender) half-inch extension, breaker bar and socket on the crank pulley bolt, rotate the engine slowly clockwise while gently holding the screwdriver. When the screwdriver rises to its peak and stops, that’s TDC. I rotated the engine back and forth slightly just to make sure.

7. Look at your synchronizer. The small tab on the center armature should either be at the 2 o’clock or 8 o’clock position (the cam turns once for every two turns of the crankshaft so the synchronizer would be 180 degrees off in the 8 o’clock position). Mine was 180 degrees out so I cleaned a spot on the crank pulley and frame and made a reference mark with a Sharpie, removed the screwdriver from the cylinder and rotated the engine one more full turn. The synchronizer tab was now at the 2 o’clock position. Any other position will be incorrect.


I took these pictures horizontally aligned as closely as possible with the center line of the engine.

8. The new synchronizer was from Richporter Technology and came with the installation tool, which is a round, plastic cap with white arrow as shown below. This tool locks the center armature and tab with the outer housing when installing the new synchronizer. Some people make reference marks to show were the old housing was located before it’s removed. This isn’t really necessary when using the tool because during insertion of the new synchronizer, the tool will situate the housing where it needs to be relative to the center armature.

9. Remove the hold-down bolt and remove the old synchronizer. The center armature will rotate counter clockwise while being removed so pay attention to where it stops rotating. This is where the tab on the new synchronizer should be lined up (if it was correct to start with) to properly install the new synchronizer. At this point I used a shop vac and cleaned the area around the hole.

10. Note where the tab on the armature fits into the plastic tool so you can align the tab for installation (the tab and arrow aren't lined up in the tool so don’t assume they are). Marking its location on the outside of the tool makes it easier. Coat the gear with oil and run some around the middle o-ring. Insert the plastic tool onto the new synchronizer and rotate it until if fully engages the inner and outer housing and locks in place.

11. Insert the new synchronizer while lining up the inner tab. I found this to be just to the right of center of the Torx bolt directly behind the synchronizer housing. Gently rotate back and forth slightly while pushing downward gently until the oil pump shaft and gears engage. The entire assembly will then rotate clockwise while being worked down.

12. After the unit bottoms out, use a compass or other tool to verify the synchronizer’s position. Ford specifies the arrow should point 38 degrees counterclockwise from the centerline of the engine. Basically that’s the 2 o’clock position (a gear tooth off in either direction is 25.7 degrees so if you’re off, you’ll definitely know it).


13. Clamp the new unit down to specs (18-ft lbs.), reinstall everything, put the spark plug back in, reinstall the inner fender liner and wheel.

The car runs much better than before. Hopefully this will help it get something better than 16 mpg. Cheers.

-
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,537 Posts
Good write-up!

If you don't want to use the screwdriver method to find TDC, you can count the teeth on the tone wheel. Put the 7th tooth after the gap directly under the crank sensor (remember the crank turns clockwise).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
i struggled to find info also so now i share :) this explains it all...any questions message me, i'm now an expert and i believe this is the 3rd synchronize shaft thats been replaced in mine and the first time was by someone else that didn't get it just right, then i followed someone elses directions and marked it and replaced it same way. it ran ok for 43,000 miles but now that i know how to do it correctly it runs GREAT at 133,000 miles! Remember to...take out all spark plugs, turn engine clockwise with a socket/ratchet on the alternator and put your finger on the number one cylinder plug hole until you feel compression then align the 6th tooth to timing mark on engine cover this is TDC. then put sync shaft assy in at 38 degrees-ish. the tool has an arrow on it and 45 degrees points directly at the firewall so one or two teeth puts you at an angle near the 38 degree angle ford specs.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I just finished replacing the cam synchronizer in my daughter’s 2000 Taurus and it was a friggen nightmare. Not so much because of the work involved, but because of the lack of detailed information I could find with explanations about the procedure. Even with a thorough tuneup, this particular vehicle still wasn’t running all that well. So when the sensor failed and threw the code, I wanted to install a new sensor and synchronizer “by the book” to make sure it was installed and working properly. Here's my version:

1. Disconnect connectors, remove air filter cover, throttle body, supports under throttle body, spark plug wires from coil and so forth. Others have covered this fine. Moving the wiring harness from over the synchronizer is a pig so take your time. I cut the tape around the plastic clamshell, opened the clamshell, pulled the wires out and kept them out of the way with a piece of wire. A couple wires were glued to the bottom of the clamshell and required some silicone to seal ripped insulation.

2. Remove the sensor, but not the synchronizer.

3. To properly set the new synchronizer, the engine has to be at top dead center (TDC). Trying to find timing marks on the crank was futile. To locate TDC, remove the spark plug from cylinder #1, which is at the back (firewall) passenger side of the engine.

4. Jack up the front passenger corner and remove the wheel. Remove the front inner fender liner. This gives you access to the crank pulley.

5. Insert a long Phillips screwdriver through the spark plug hole. I tilted the handle up to give the screwdriver as much a direct angle on the piston as possible.

6. Using a long (something that will clear the fender) half-inch extension, breaker bar and socket on the crank pulley bolt, rotate the engine slowly clockwise while gently holding the screwdriver. When the screwdriver rises to its peak and stops, that’s TDC. I rotated the engine back and forth slightly just to make sure.

7. Look at your synchronizer. The small tab on the center armature should either be at the 2 o’clock or 8 o’clock position (the cam turns once for every two turns of the crankshaft so the synchronizer would be 180 degrees off in the 8 o’clock position). Mine was 180 degrees out so I cleaned a spot on the crank pulley and frame and made a reference mark with a Sharpie, removed the screwdriver from the cylinder and rotated the engine one more full turn. The synchronizer tab was now at the 2 o’clock position. Any other position will be incorrect.


I took these pictures horizontally aligned as closely as possible with the center line of the engine.

8. The new synchronizer was from Richporter Technology and came with the installation tool, which is a round, plastic cap with white arrow as shown below. This tool locks the center armature and tab with the outer housing when installing the new synchronizer. Some people make reference marks to show were the old housing was located before it’s removed. This isn’t really necessary when using the tool because during insertion of the new synchronizer, the tool will situate the housing where it needs to be relative to the center armature.

9. Remove the hold-down bolt and remove the old synchronizer. The center armature will rotate counter clockwise while being removed so pay attention to where it stops rotating. This is where the tab on the new synchronizer should be lined up (if it was correct to start with) to properly install the new synchronizer. At this point I used a shop vac and cleaned the area around the hole.

10. Note where the tab on the armature fits into the plastic tool so you can align the tab for installation (the tab and arrow aren't lined up in the tool so don’t assume they are). Marking its location on the outside of the tool makes it easier. Coat the gear with oil and run some around the middle o-ring. Insert the plastic tool onto the new synchronizer and rotate it until if fully engages the inner and outer housing and locks in place.

11. Insert the new synchronizer while lining up the inner tab. I found this to be just to the right of center of the Torx bolt directly behind the synchronizer housing. Gently rotate back and forth slightly while pushing downward gently until the oil pump shaft and gears engage. The entire assembly will then rotate clockwise while being worked down.

12. After the unit bottoms out, use a compass or other tool to verify the synchronizer’s position. Ford specifies the arrow should point 38 degrees counterclockwise from the centerline of the engine. Basically that’s the 2 o’clock position (a gear tooth off in either direction is 25.7 degrees so if you’re off, you’ll definitely know it).


13. Clamp the new unit down to specs (18-ft lbs.), reinstall everything, put the spark plug back in, reinstall the inner fender liner and wheel.

The car runs much better than before. Hopefully this will help it get something better than 16 mpg. Cheers.

-
I thought that the only reason why Ford suggests it’s at the 38 degree mark is because this position is least stressful on the sensor connector. As long as you use the tool for the synchronizer and set cylinders 1&5 at tdc I’ve read that it doesn’t matter how the synchronizer is positioned. Is this information correct? Sorry for reviving a dead thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,898 Posts
I thought that the only reason why Ford suggests it’s at the 38 degree mark is because this position is least stressful on the sensor connector. As long as you use the tool for the synchronizer and set cylinders 1&5 at tdc I’ve read that it doesn’t matter how the synchronizer is positioned. Is this information correct? Sorry for reviving a dead thread.
Agree on that. I replaced four of these and never took it to TDC. I just use a socket and ratchet on the alternator nut. I removed the sensor and place the installation tool on the syncro and turn the alternator with the ratchet until the installation tool fits into the syncro. I then mark the direction of the arrow. I pull the syncro and then place the installation tool on the new syncro and install it so the arrow is facing the same position as it did in the old syncro. Done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Ok
Agree on that. I replaced four of these and never took it to TDC. I just use a socket and ratchet on the alternator nut. I removed the sensor and place the installation tool on the syncro and turn the alternator with the ratchet until the installation tool fits into the syncro. I then mark the direction of the arrow. I pull the syncro and then place the installation tool on the new syncro and install it so the arrow is facing the same position as it did in the old syncro. Done.
Ok perfect. Thanks for the response. I just did head gaskets and made the mistake of pulling the synchronizer without marking it first.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top