Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I tagged on to a posting yesterday, and got some initial troubleshooting info. I applied this to my A/C troubleshooting, and here is a list of my symptoms and some observations.

1. No Cooling Air, at all.
2. Under the hood, a relay clicks about every 5 seconds.
3. At each click, the inner pulley on the A/C compressor with 3 each 1" diameter bosses on it engages and spins for a few seconds.
4. After stopping, it spins again on the next click. (repeats.)
5. When spinning, it appears to be operating normally. No noise, no wobble.

This seems to indicate a low coolant (R-134, according to the sticker). The info I got yesterday was that of removing a shim. Does the fact that the clutch spins the inner pulley eliminate that possibility?

Thanks.

Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
I am trying to diagnose mine as well and what it seems like is if you can catch it while it is not working, bump it with a broom stick and it should engage. This would indicate the shim fix. If it is litterally turning on and of as rapid as 5 seconds, then I am not so sure. In my case it will work sometimes as well, but it can stay off for quite a while. I am waiting to catch it while it is not working and then try the broomstick and see if that will engage the clutch.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,170 Posts
Sounds like the typical low on refrigerant symptoms I've seen plenty of times.

If you jumper the low pressure switch on or near the reciever / dryer as a test it should stay on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I had convinced myself that it was a low-refrigerant problem, and needed to wait to the weekend to address it.

At my Beloved Local Wal-Mart, I purchased an 18 Oz. can of Interdynamics' EZ Chill, the product with the gage on it. FYI, the Interdynamics web site has an extensive "how-to" video library.

I carefully followed the instructions in what turned out to be an easy, straightforward "topping-off" procedure It accepted the full can, and this amount of r-134A maintained a pressure of 33-38 psi at the completion of the fill process. This is the "blue" or "filled" range (25-45 psi) noted on the gage, provided.

The A/C is now blowing chilled air, and appears to be working normally. The reseach project took 4-5 days, the process itself, about 10 minutes. The only problem is that the original charge went somewhere, and, of couse, there's a possibility that this could only be a temporary fix. We'll see.

Based on my vast experience of 10 minutes in the Automotive Air Conditioning repair field, I would like to stess that it is crucial that you use a gage during this process. Without the gage to verify when the system was corrctly charged, I would have stumbled around in the dark, and probably have added a second can "just to be safe". As a minimum, I would have wasted $10-$12, and perhaps have damaged or compromised the A/C system on the auto.

On my '99 Sable Duratek, the low pressure A/C fill port had a black cap and was located on the passenger's side, at the firewall. It is 10" behind, and directly in-line-with the lid on the Power Steering reservoir.

(Confusing note: There is a similar, but much larger diameter, fitting jutting vertically up in front of the Coolant recovery tank. It is physically much larger than the low-pressure port. I assume this to be the high-pressure port, and of course wanted nothing to do with it. The re-fill connector wouldn't fit on it anyway. Basic safety design, I'm sure.)
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top