Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Bad design having it internal. Mine was replaced at 82,000 miles. $2200. I saw yesterday that a class action law suit has been filed against Ford over the water pump issue. It would be a nice surprise if they issued a recall in response and i got reimbursed for some of my cost.
2013 Taurus (166,000 miles) has had a ton more issues than that of my 2007 Explorer (235,000 miles), and my wives 2005 Freestar (200,000 miles)
Now rear passenger side door lock is having issues and door wont open from inside or outside. Unless you pull up on lock at the same time i hit the unlock button.
Radio /cd randomly doesn't work after start. Have to remove key, get out of car and wait 10 sec then restart. then sometimes it will work again.
Ready to be rid of it and get something else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Bad design having it internal. Mine was replaced at 82,000 miles. $2200. I saw yesterday that a class action law suit has been filed against Ford over the water pump issue. It would be a nice surprise if they issued a recall in response and i got reimbursed for some of my cost.
2013 Taurus (166,000 miles) has had a ton more issues than that of my 2007 Explorer (235,000 miles), and my wives 2005 Freestar (200,000 miles)
Now rear passenger side door lock is having issues and door wont open from inside or outside. Unless you pull up on lock at the same time i hit the unlock button.
Radio /cd randomly doesn't work after start. Have to remove key, get out of car and wait 10 sec then restart. then sometimes it will work again.
Ready to be rid of it and get something else.

I started to see issues develop with my 2010 with 114k miles. PTU leaking, trans lines leaking and I kept up with maintenance. So far my 2013 with 81k seems to be holding up well.


If I were you I would cut my losses and get rid, before it becomes an endless money pit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Should I be concerned that I got my water pump repaired at 84,000 miles and now I am at 164,000?
Might it go again after 80,000 +/-, or does Ford repair make life longer?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Speaking of now that this is concerning me, should I personally be aware of any maintenance or things to do to maintain my Taurus specifically? It's at almost 80k and has been dead reliable, however I'd rather not display my luck and have something happen out of nowhere.

I'm just unsure of what specifically should/must be done at what times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
I think always the biggest worry is the dreaded water pump failure. I change my coolant at LEAST once a year.


We can all keep up with maintenance meticulously and even then things fail. Easier said than done but try not to worry too much about it. As long as maintain it there is nothing else you can really do.


I'd just say be very strict on keeping up with maintenance and maybe complete tasks before Ford say it should be done (such as "lifetime" PTU fluid, or "lifelong" transmission fluid etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Should I be concerned that I got my water pump repaired at 84,000 miles and now I am at 164,000?
Might it go again after 80,000 +/-, or does Ford repair make life longer?

How often have you changed the coolant since the new pump install? Did the other pump fail?


I'd just be mindful of coolant changes and do them more regular than Ford recommends.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
I think always the biggest worry is the dreaded water pump failure. I change my coolant at LEAST once a year.


We can all keep up with maintenance meticulously and even then things fail. Easier said than done but try not to worry too much about it. As long as maintain it there is nothing else you can really do.


I'd just say be very strict on keeping up with maintenance and maybe complete tasks before Ford say it should be done (such as "lifetime" PTU fluid, or "lifelong" transmission fluid etc.

Well that brings me to my next situation. I've done a brake fluid flush, transmission flush, intake cleaning, fuel system cleaning, new injectors and spark plugs, etc. I actually have never done a coolant flush and probably should, but I'm unsure how.


I need to install my ported lower intake manifold but, of course, the water pump is inside the lower intake so the collant must be flushed to remove that and install the new lower manifold. My service manual specifies it must be done with a machine in order to refill the system with coolant after it's drained which sounds absurd to me.


So if I may ask, what's the procedure to flushing all the old coolant and refilling some new stuff in there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Well that brings me to my next situation. I've done a brake fluid flush, transmission flush, intake cleaning, fuel system cleaning, new injectors and spark plugs, etc. I actually have never done a coolant flush and probably should, but I'm unsure how.


I need to install my ported lower intake manifold but, of course, the water pump is inside the lower intake so the collant must be flushed to remove that and install the new lower manifold. My service manual specifies it must be done with a machine in order to refill the system with coolant after it's drained which sounds absurd to me.


So if I may ask, what's the procedure to flushing all the old coolant and refilling some new stuff in there?

My friend owns a NAPA repair shop so he does it for me. However this video may help

https://www.carcarekiosk.com/video/2011_Ford_Taurus_SEL_3.5L_V6/coolant_antifreeze/flush_coolant
 

·
Gen 5/6 Forum Moderator
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
I don't know that changing the coolant will prevent the failure, but it really can't hurt. The PTU is another story.

It might be smarter to squirrel away $1200 for a rainy day.

If you're at 80k now and doing well, I'd probably pay Blackstone for an analysis on your next oil change, if only to find if they're seeing coolant traces in the oil. If not, change the coolant but know that things are looking good for that moment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
I don't know that changing the coolant will prevent the failure, but it really can't hurt. The PTU is another story.

It might be smarter to squirrel away $1200 for a rainy day.

If you're at 80k now and doing well, I'd probably pay Blackstone for an analysis on your next oil change, if only to find if they're seeing coolant traces in the oil. If not, change the coolant but know that things are looking good for that moment.

Well luckily enough I don't have a PTU since my bull is FWD.


And by analysis, do you mean a quick teardown around the crankcase to possibly find traces of coolant and other contaminants?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,754 Posts
Blackstone oil analysis. You take a sample of you oil, send it to them, and a week or 2 later they send you a very detailed report on the condition of the oil, and possible causes of anything out of the ordinary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Blackstone oil analysis. You take a sample of you oil, send it to them, and a week or 2 later they send you a very detailed report on the condition of the oil, and possible causes of anything out of the ordinary.

That doesn't sound like a bad idea. I think the coolant is the only thing I haven't done to my car as far as maintenance but I'm hoping it's rather straightforward when I eventually get to that point.
I'm the kinda guy that literally wants everything to be in perfect working order (being cursed with perfectionism) so any little thing that can improve functionality or performance, I'm all over it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
That doesn't sound like a bad idea. I think the coolant is the only thing I haven't done to my car as far as maintenance but I'm hoping it's rather straightforward when I eventually get to that point.
I'm the kinda guy that literally wants everything to be in perfect working order (being cursed with perfectionism) so any little thing that can improve functionality or performance, I'm all over it.
https://www.blackstone-labs.com/products/free-test-kits/?session-id=otde5r55js514p45ot0niqq1&timeout=20&bslauth=&urlbase=https://www.blackstone-labs.net/Bstone/(S(otde5r55js514p45ot0niqq1))/
 

·
Gen 5/6 Forum Moderator
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
I've used Blackstone twice and was very happy each time. They'll even send you free sample bottles and pre-paid shipping back to Indiana.

I can send you my last two reports -- one was on the PTU for the Explorer and the other was a UOA for the Taurus when I still had it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Ive gotta 2008 Ford Taurus SEL with the 3.5 L engine, which I am assuming I am just as much at risk and perhaps more-so than Gen 6 Taurus owners. I am currently at around 119350 miles(I got it at 103450), got my last oil change at around 115500 with full synthetic, considering on perhaps switching to a motorcraft synthetic blend or full synthetic with a Ford dealer The Works change.

I did a full coolant flush of my system back in June at Valvoline. I have had no issues with my oil looking milky or anything, no seepage of coolant as far as I can tell and it has stayed in the normal range. I wish I could ask my trustworthy mechanic to inspect it, but I know how much of a hassle and cost that would be. What should I look out for and keep an eye on?

120,000 miles is coming up.... I have had a Transmission Flush back at 105,000 miles. Should I take my car to my local Ford or just take it to my local mechanic for a tune up?

I want my car to last forever, because well its my first car and I love it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,754 Posts
There is no such thing as a "tune up" anymore. At 115K I would consider a spark plug change using ONLY the correct Motorcraft plugs or their NGK equivalent. Plug change is a fairly straight forward DIY project even on a Cyclone.

As for the water pump, just check oil regularly looking for the "milkshake", and watch coolant level looking for any unexplained drops in the level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Recently saw a low miles 08 Taurus X and was interested...until i saw the video that started this tread. I thought changing the water pump on my KIA minivan was a night mare....No interest for me on a vehicle like this...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I did statistical process quality control for a living for 10 years, and now do cost savings analysis.

I wish we had good data for a decision point for the pump failure rates and MTF (mean time to failure). As a general observation, while most people do a good job in changing engine oil/filters, coolant is a neglected item. It does not help that the coolants today are advertised as "lifetime" or 100k mile changes; that is so far out that most folks just plain forget. Other people are good at following prescribed changes, but again, with the coolant life cycle being so long, it's not really known how the pump failure would relate to the coolant change regime.

For those who do change their coolant preemptively, much sooner than Ford recommends, we'd have to see what kind of correlation would exist between coolant life and pump life. So we have a few groups to consider, and I suspect the data is lacking to make a good determination as to "when" a pump will fail.

Correlation does not equate to causation, but without correlation there can be no causation. If we could find correlation between coolant life and pump life, we'd at least have some track to follow. Sadly, I doubt the data is available to us.


All water pumps fail. The issue with these is that they don't always give the tale-tell weep leak to let us know. If we're lucky, they leak via the weep hole and we get a hint of impending doom. The problem is that they don't always do this; some will leak on the opposite seal and leak into the engine. While oil analysis may pick up on this, it would have to be a slow enough enough that discovery predates doom. That may or may not be true.

The nature of the pump being buried inside the engine is a nod to packaging. Can't have it all, folks. Things take up space, and putting the pump inside saves space for any particular chassis package.


The Achilles heel in an otherwise excellent engine.

I bought my two Taurus cars knowing this going in. I hope to catch the issues prior to catastrophe, and change out preventative. Only time will tell ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
It doesn't help that they put the weep hole in an oddball place behind the alternator. There are videos showing where to check it.

The dealerships charge an arm and a leg to do this repair if caught early and it doesn't damage the engine internals. A good, reputable repair shop can often do just as good a job, sometimes better, and warranty their work, to boot.

Whatever you do, use the name brand part on this repair. Many aftermarket pump are out there, but suffer from far lower reliability. Plan on a new timing chain and guides, as well. It's worth it in the long run.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top