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Discussion Starter #161
So the rust bucket has been on the road for 10 months, and now has 103,000 kms on the clock. Drives nice, comfortable, no complaints. Here it is, oct 16/14, ready for the winter months, with 4 new studded winters on her, use.jpg , use2.jpg .My wife is extremely happy with the car, but i have had several issues with it. Nothing too serious, but tedious none the less.

1st had to replace the exhaust flex pipe. All my fault. I started to notice a subtle change in the sound of the exhaust, but being busy with other things, I chose to ignore it for the time being.Well that was a mistake. My wife headed out one morning, and was back 5 minutes later dragging the flex pipe on the ground(destroying it in the process). Upon inspection, I found that it broke away at the weld on the flange side of the pipe. No doubt in my mind that I should have completely removed the exhaust, rather than move it from side to side, when I was working underneath her. I think that started the crack. As well, if I wasn't such a dumb bum, and addressed the issue when I first noticed it, then it would have been a simple weld repair and not a complete replacement. I live but I never learn haha.

2nd I noticed a strange sound (electrical in nature) under the hood while simultaneously experiencing a drop in rpm. The timing was constant. I immediately suspected the Ac. Lifted the hood, and sure enough, sparks were flying from the AC clutch assembly. Can't get to it until spring,( garage is full, just started a restoration on a 90 YJ wrangler),damn,another subframe drop. I disconnected it for now. Windows fog a little, but turn the heat up and crack the window a little, takes care of that.

3rd Wife came home today and informed me the wipers don't work. Great, and with snow on the horizon. I checked the fuse and relays, all good, so tomorrow I will remove the cowl and check for voltage at the motor and go from there.

So in closing, I have to say I'm pleased with the outcome, and would do it again. Cheers for now.
 

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Automender, just had the fuel pump on my sister in laws 2000 taurus replaced at 65,000 miles! :(
 

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Probably one of the best threads here detailing this type of work. I enjoy seeing what seasoned metal workers can accomplish out of scrap materials and perseverance.

Something you said early on struck me, cars that sit may rust (rot) in different ways than driven ones. I've found it to be quite true with my 1st gen with 110k original miles on it. She stays mostly parked these days, but I keep her up running and clean, and I'm constantly encountering non-typical issues each time I'm out fooling around with her.
 

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SO, for newer members, go back and read this thread from page 1, it shows what can be done with perseverance...
............. and alcohol.......... LOTS of alcohol. :lol2:

Great job on the car. It's the little things that will pop up now but it's no where near what you went through to get it back on the road!
 

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So the rust bucket has been on the road for 10 months, and now has 103,000 kms on the clock. Drives nice, comfortable, no complaints. Here it is, oct 16/14, ready for the winter months, with 4 new studded winters on her, View attachment 133234 , View attachment 133242 .My wife is extremely happy with the car, but i have had several issues with it. Nothing too serious, but tedious none the less.

1st had to replace the exhaust flex pipe. All my fault. I started to notice a subtle change in the sound of the exhaust, but being busy with other things, I chose to ignore it for the time being.Well that was a mistake. My wife headed out one morning, and was back 5 minutes later dragging the flex pipe on the ground(destroying it in the process). Upon inspection, I found that it broke away at the weld on the flange side of the pipe. No doubt in my mind that I should have completely removed the exhaust, rather than move it from side to side, when I was working underneath her. I think that started the crack. As well, if I wasn't such a dumb bum, and addressed the issue when I first noticed it, then it would have been a simple weld repair and not a complete replacement. I live but I never learn haha.

2nd I noticed a strange sound (electrical in nature) under the hood while simultaneously experiencing a drop in rpm. The timing was constant. I immediately suspected the Ac. Lifted the hood, and sure enough, sparks were flying from the AC clutch assembly. Can't get to it until spring,( garage is full, just started a restoration on a 90 YJ wrangler),damn,another subframe drop. I disconnected it for now. Windows fog a little, but turn the heat up and crack the window a little, takes care of that.

3rd Wife came home today and informed me the wipers don't work. Great, and with snow on the horizon. I checked the fuse and relays, all good, so tomorrow I will remove the cowl and check for voltage at the motor and go from there.

So in closing, I have to say I'm pleased with the outcome, and would do it again. Cheers for now.
Be careful on the AC deal. it could leave your stranded! I Had issues with
my 98 and it was making a metallic scrapping sort of noise. Coming from
the AC pump. ac was still working! well, had to tear it down. dropped subframe for access so i did not have to let the R134 out. after much
cussing and breaking a subframe bolt, i discovered it was making noise
because the bearing on the AC Pulley assembly was shot and missing a ball or two. Eventually it will loose them all and your serp belt may come
flying off. I took the assembly off with the pump still connected in the
car a put one on off a junk car. Was a big pain but it works now. Be careful of the front pulley spacers which set the distance between the
rotating surfaces.
 

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Discussion Starter #167
Thanks for the kind words all. DWB you crack me up hahaha. Yeah sousa, anything from here on should be a cake walk in comparison. Soundu, good post, your observations make sense. I honestly never thought of the pully seizing and flipping the belt. It would be like the flex pipe, fix it now while the cost is minimal, or put it off until it cost more in damages. I think I will opt for the former. Thanks for the heads up.
 

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Discussion Starter #168
Update on wipers. Pulled the wiper arms and cowling off, hooked my meter to the harness and found all proper voltages. So by process of elimination, the motor is fubared. Plugged the harness back in, gave the motor a tap with the hammer and away they went. Obviously there is a dead spot in the field and the motor will need replacing in the near future. But I'll go with what i got for now, and concentrate on the AC clutch assembly.
 

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Heck if you wanted to, you could yank the fans out, remove the AC comp bolts and fold the compressor on its side if it's like a late 80s Taurus. Use impact to buzz out the center bolt. Then pull the parts off and replace.
 

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Update on wipers. Pulled the wiper arms and cowling off, hooked my meter to the harness and found all proper voltages. So by process of elimination, the motor is fubared. Plugged the harness back in, gave the motor a tap with the hammer and away they went. Obviously there is a dead spot in the field and the motor will need replacing in the near future. But I'll go with what i got for now, and concentrate on the AC clutch assembly.
My exp with A/C clutch
"Hot wire" the coil with the belt on and it will hold the shaft from turning.
Unscrew the center screw.
The plate should slip off with little effort.
The snap ring for the bearing needs a bit of patience. Need 90 degree snap ring pliers, and a mirror. Good quality snap ring pliers. No junk.
With the snap ring off the pulley/bearing can be pryed off with screw drivers.

Goes back the same way.
Shims give the air gap clearance to the armature/pulley by trial and error.
I gave a young guy working out of his fathers shop 1 hour to do this. My old hands do not do well in tight places.

-chart-

-chart-
 

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My exp with A/C clutch
"Hot wire" the coil with the belt on and it will hold the shaft from turning.
Unscrew the center screw.
The plate should slip off with little effort.
The snap ring for the bearing needs a bit of patience. Need 90 degree snap ring pliers, and a mirror. Good quality snap ring pliers. No junk.
With the snap ring off the pulley/bearing can be pryed off with screw drivers.

Goes back the same way.
Shims give the air gap clearance to the armature/pulley by trial and error.
I gave a young guy working out of his fathers shop 1 hour to do this. My old hands do not do well in tight places.

-chart-

-chart-
When i did it, i just used my small impact on the center bolt and it came
right off. Of course, not everyone has one. When it first was going bad,
i thought i had a bad idler/tensioner wheel. Had one of those grenade
on me once too. but it turned out to be the AC pulley.

I had people tell me i could do it without lowering the front subframe,
but i could just not find the clearance to do it without lowering it
(pump still connected to lines).

If your going to do this yourself, it helps to spray the whole area with
degreaser and wash it down first. You will thank yourself latter.
 

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Discussion Starter #172
Being as how I am presented with a problem of a more serious nature, which I will dedicate a separate thread on, now would be a good time to update the members on the rust bucket. My wife has been driving it for 2 1/2 years now, put 20,000 mi on it, and loves it. During that time I bypassed the AC,(clutch was bad) using a smaller belt. Works just fine for me. Replaced the starter, the pita of that job was, had to do it in her workplace parking lot, haha. Replaced the front calipers, pads and rotors, as one of the calipers was seizing. Passed inspection no problem in May. So, all in all, its been pretty reliable transportation.Stay tuned for the new thread, the rust bucket with transmission woes.
 

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2001 Taurus front frame replacement

Hey jag, what a game. Quick gets all 3 stars in my book. He made it anybodys game. Sorry your team lost, but not near as sorry had it been my teams loss. Back to the job at hand. Yesterday I finished up with the frame and it's components and gave it overnight to dry. Here are the components, View attachment 88937 , and here is the frame, View attachment 88945 . This morning I put it all together. Here it sits, ready to be installed. View attachment 88953 . I have yet to acquire the heater core bypass assembly and spark plugs, so the frame has to wait until i get that job done. After I finished with the frame, it was time to get on my back and weld some patch work underneath. I will try to get some pics of it tomorrow, but i'm not sure how they will turn out. Hope all is having a good day.
I have an '01 Taurus that needs the front frame replaced due to going into a ditch. How difficult was this part of your project? I know they are different generations, but same basic principle. The car itself is in great condition for it's age and to me is worth it. 76,000 original miles in great shape otherwise. I've never tackled this large of a repair, but not afraid to try. I've located the part locally and plan to pick it up this week.
I will be working in the yard to do it, and plan to construct an overhead support for the engine and transmission. In addition, I will construct another support to completely raise the car off the ground on the back end. Overkill on support, maybe, but safety is a priority. My son and I will be conquering this project.
 

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I have an '01 Taurus that needs the front frame replaced due to going into a ditch. How difficult was this part of your project? I know they are different generations, but same basic principle. The car itself is in great condition for it's age and to me is worth it. 76,000 original miles in great shape otherwise. I've never tackled this large of a repair, but not afraid to try. I've located the part locally and plan to pick it up this week.
I will be working in the yard to do it, and plan to construct an overhead support for the engine and transmission. In addition, I will construct another support to completely raise the car off the ground on the back end. Overkill on support, maybe, but safety is a priority. My son and I will be conquering this project.
You get get a engine support bracket from harbor freight or other places reasonable.

https://www.harborfreight.com/1000-lb-capacity-engine-support-bar-96524.html

then you can drop the subframe out with the engine and trannie still hanging
(dont forget to take the PS rack off!) If you in the bone yard snagging one,
you can then stack tires underneath the hanging engine and get your bracket off.
you will probably need a stubby 18MM to do steering rack fittings. a high FtLB battery
impact will save you when you do this. Dont be surprised to find some bolts on the subframe
mounts that are rusted out. If You get too boned on the donor, move on to the next car.
go to harbor and get the longest 1/2" drive breaker bar they have. You will probably need
that too. You will also find you probably will need new subframe mounts too. check the
donor subframe for the bolts rusted through the subframe (was a recall for that). If its rusted
through the donor is toast.


here is the gotcha. if the damage to the subframe included bending the unibody support,
a replacement subframe will never align and bolt up properly. Not sure what kind of damage you
had. I had to junk my driving but wounded 93 wagon because the strut tower was bent enough
to cause alignment issues. It takes a frame machine to fix that kind of damage if it can be fixed at all.
 
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