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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Parents just picked up a 2005 Taurus, and I'm helping them get it tuned up a bit/helping with some repairs.
The power steering pump went out, so we got a replacement at the local salvage yard, but thinking maybe the pressure line should be replaced.
The cylinder looking thing in the pressure line seems like it's leaking somewhere, haven't quite gotten a good look at it just yet. Any cheap solutions that work if that turns out to be suspect? Considered the salvage yard for that part, but it seems likely we'd run into the problem again in due time.

Also, checked the fault code with my cheap OBD-II scanner, and pulled some codes. Getting a misfire that at least isn't being helped by the coil pack having a crack in one of the terminals. The one on the left closest to the front of the car if you're facing it. Is it possible a bad spark plug or wire could be contributing? Checking the plugs soon; likely replacing.

Here's a picture of what fault codes Torque pulled up, let me know if anything seems like it should be checked!
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Edit: Also, just checked rockauto.com, and for coil pack replacements they show COP coils, is that an alternative option to the coil pack? I feel like I'm missing something :unsure:
 

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Any cracks in the coil pack, no matter how small = coil pack needs replacing. Use ONLY the Motorcraft or BWD part.

Coil pack can not be replaced with COPs. Are you sure you are looking under the correct engine? Vulcan (3.0 OHV) uses coil pack and Duratec (3.0 DPHC) uses COPs.
 

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Change that coil pack if there is any cracks, but I'm looking at that P1233. Might need to check the relay and the pump module harness/wiring. If this is failing then it can cause your lean codes and misfire codes. Though I suspect that coil might be your cylinder 1 misfire.
 

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You need to know what engine is in the car, Vulcan or Duratec? If there are spark plug wires going to a coil mounted on the front valve cover then it is a Vulcan engine for that year.

You may have a vacuum leak that is causing the random misfire trouble code. Look for cracked or broken vacuum lines.
 

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If the 3.0 Vulcan do replace the plug wires with Bosch set, well worth the extra cost. Be sure to clear the codes so the engine computer will relearn with the new plugs installed.

You can get the new line from Rock Auto. Get a set of crow foot wrenches to access the fittings at the steering rack.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Any cracks in the coil pack, no matter how small = coil pack needs replacing. Use ONLY the Motorcraft or BWD part.

Coil pack can not be replaced with COPs. Are you sure you are looking under the correct engine? Vulcan (3.0 OHV) uses coil pack and Duratec (3.0 DPHC) uses COPs.
Jeff It's a vulcan, I checked the VIN and it has a U for the 8th letter like the guide showed in the intro section on here. Not sure why rockauto has COPs listed for this car though, it also has the Motorcraft coil pack posted which we'll be getting.

Change that coil pack if there is any cracks, but I'm looking at that P1233. Might need to check the relay and the pump module harness/wiring. If this is failing then it can cause your lean codes and misfire codes. Though I suspect that coil might be your cylinder 1 misfire.
Nate I think you're right for the coil pack causing the misfire, it's a pretty pronounced crack in the casing. Where would I find the relay and module harness/wiring?

You need to know what engine is in the car, Vulcan or Duratec? If there are spark plug wires going to a coil mounted on the front valve cover then it is a Vulcan engine for that year.

You may have a vacuum leak that is causing the random misfire trouble code. Look for cracked or broken vacuum lines.
Automender I'll be checking for faulty lines soon here, curious if Nate's idea might be another suspect for the misfire/lean conditions so we'll have to cover all bases.

If the 3.0 Vulcan do replace the plug wires with Bosch set, well worth the extra cost. Be sure to clear the codes so the engine computer will relearn with the new plugs installed.

You can get the new line from Rock Auto. Get a set of crow foot wrenches to access the fittings at the steering rack.
James I'll be sure to follow that advice when we do the spark plugs, thank you. We got the pump at a local salvage yard, and got the pressure line at AutoZone, under $100 overall. As you'll see below, something is up though.

Sorry for the late reply, life's been busy the last week.
We replaced the pump, and the pressure line to the power steering pump. Just topped off the fluid and tried out turning the wheel while the front was raised on jacks, then lowered it down, and the pump wasn't working while on the ground and running. The reservoir may have been overfilled, because the fluid started coming out of from the seams of the lid, and ..what sort of looked like the top of the cap. Not certain about the top, but the reservoir lid may need replaced as well.
Anyway, everything seems to be attached properly, and it's still not working. So I'm thinking I may need to look deeper into what other parts could be causing the pump to not work.

Edit: also something important to note, the fluid comes out foamy, which apparently could suggest a leak somewhere?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
^+1. Sounds like air in the system needing bled or a leak(s).
Do you know what parts could be responsible for a possible leak? We've bled it, and no improvement - the fluid seems decently foamy which seems like air is getting in, but I haven't gotten a chance to check online to see what it could be yet.
 

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The reservoir cap has a bleed hole in it so it will leak fluid if there is air in system. The air gets compressed in the system under pressure. Then if you fill the reservoir when you shut car off the air expands and pukes fluid out the cap. I have used vacuum to remove air in the system. Sometimes the suction hose at the reservoir may leak in air, make sure it is tight. If your seals on the rack are bad they sometimes will leak in air. Why did you replcar the pump in the first place?
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
The reservoir cap has a bleed hole in it so it will leak fluid if there is air in system. The air gets compressed in the system under pressure. Then if you fill the reservoir when you shut car off the air expands and pukes fluid out the cap. I have used vacuum to remove air in the system. Sometimes the suction hose at the reservoir may leak in air, make sure it is tight. If your seals on the rack are bad they sometimes will leak in air. Why did you replcar the pump in the first place?
We were told by the prior owners that the pump was bad, so we were hoping it would be a quick replacement job - obviously not the case! How did you use vacuum to remove air? Is that assuming that there may be a loose line? We'll check when it gets warmer today, it's an inviting 18 degrees out right now. Also, saw a few people posting on the forum mention the rack, I'll try to do some further investigation on that as well.

Edit: This is the post that had me questioning the rack. I'm not too well-versed in that area, so right now we're trying a slightly revised method for bleeding; the wheel turning with the front end suspended - but waiting after turning to lock, repeat.

If this doesn't work, we're considering renting a vacuum pump setup to bleed it that way. Any advice is greatly appreciated, right now we're at wits end until we find another solution.
 

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If you are using the raised wheel method to bleed the breaks and don't have a vacuum pump I don't think it will help you too much more. I asked why you replaced the pump because I wasn't sure the junkyard pump was any good either. If the air doesn't come out then you either have bad seals in the rack at where the tie rods connect to the rack, or any suction side of the power steering piping.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If you are using the raised wheel method to bleed the breaks and don't have a vacuum pump I don't think it will help you too much more. I asked why you replaced the pump because I wasn't sure the junkyard pump was any good either. If the air doesn't come out then you either have bad seals in the rack at where the tie rods connect to the rack, or any suction side of the power steering piping.
You're saying the vacuum pump would be the best bet aside from checking out the other possibilities? The junkyard pump, we're honestly not positive if it's good, although it's all we can afford for the time being. They rated it as excellent condition, although nobody is sure whether the car it was taken from was running when it got there. Do you know where to find any diagrams to see what we're looking for as far as the other connections that could be leaking in air?
 

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Vacuum method is shown in the service manual and I once replace a pump with aftermarket and no matter how long I bled the system it was still noisy and puke fluid. I uses the vacuum method and made the adapter to use on the reservoir. I used an air powered vacuum from Harbor Freight.
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I finally bought a pump from dealer and two minutes latter it was quite and worked. I am not sure how you can single out the rack from being bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I appreciate all of the advice, everyone. Unfortunately, it turned out to be the rack and pinion. I believe it was an internal failure with the seals from what I heard. The prior owner figured it was only the power steering pump, and didn't have the time or need to look into it. He was going to scrap it and get ~$50 (they pay in weight of the car), so he actually gave us back the entire amount we paid minus the $50 he expected.

We're planning on scrapping it and moving forward now, as we don't have access to a lift to do the necessary repairs. It's unlikely we'll make much (if any) profit if we sold this as a 'mechanic's special' locally, so I'm just taking it as a learning experience. I appreciate all of the help! I was hopeful this car was going to last for years, honestly. I've heard people say these cars will last a lifetime if they're maintained, but it's unfortunate that many of the parts in these bulls are hard to access unless you're a really experienced mechanic, or have connections/resources that can be really costly.

R.I.P. to the 2005 Taurus. It was (stressful, but) fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Racks can be replaced without a lift, but not easy.
Yeah that's the ultimate issue, the Taurus was supposed to replace a work commuter car, so we needed it running fast and with minimal hassle. Considering the rack, coil pack, and something with the rear brake all needing to be fixed/replaced, it just boiled down to bad timing.
 

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You can pull the R&P from the driver side, you will need box wrench to remove the two nuts that hold the rack in place.
I had two start leaking a week apart, got two from Autozone on a promo. Lifetime warranty.
Crowfoot wrenches make it easier to remove the lines. Use flare wrench first to loosen the nuts then crowfoot.

In a pinch you can use engine vacuum to help take the air out of the system after the new rack in installed.
You will need to swap the tiny valve fitting from the old rack to the new one.
 
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