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Hello,

On a 2003 Taurus SE. This problem has occurred in the past, however it has gone away and been forgotten until it randomly returns. The car will be somewhat warm when this happens (it will have reached running temperature then sat for an hour or so). You get into the car, you start it, it starts, stumbles, then stalls. If you go to crank it over to start again, it will just crank, no fire. If you turn the key completely off, wait a second or two, it will fire and then stumble and stall. I can keep it running by giving it some gas. It will run and the higher RPM no problem. If you let off of the gas, it will stall again.

I was able to drive the car home (about 5 miles), after these five miles of contact throttle, the problem has disappeared. It will idle without a problem now.

Any ideas? I'm looking into the crankshaft position sensor and potentially camshaft sync.
 

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I'll see if I can get things started. Do you have a CEL/SES light lit???? If so, have the computer scanned for trouble codes & post All of the code Numbers found, as they can offer up good trouble shooting clues. Most autoparts stores will do it at no cost.

If you don't have a lit trouble light, you could have more than one problem that the computer isn't monitoring, but right now it kinda sounds like a fuel delivery issue.

So do a KOEO & KOER fuel pressure & delivery over time check & post the numbers. I'm thinking maybe a weak fuel pump & or clogged fuel filter.

If you can't come by a fuel pressure gauge, or don't want to buy one, when it acts out & wont start & run, try cycling the ignition switch from Off to Run, 4-5 times (but don't go to Start to crank the engine), pause in run long enough to hear the fuel pump cycle on & off each time, about 2 seconds, Then go to Start to crank the engine. If it'll immediately fire & run, suspect the fuel pump.

On the idle problem, the IAC is responsable for idle speed, so maybe pull & clean it with a plastic safe spray, to remove the carbon deposits you'll likely find, especially those on the center shaft where it goes through the bulkhead. If idle improves with cleaning, suspect the IAC & consider replacement, as cleaning usually doesn't last long, it didn't on my Ranger, I suppose thats why Ford recommends replacement, but cleaning was a good trouble shooting step for me as I knew what to replace when it acted out again.

Some thoughts for consideration, let us know how it goes.
 

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Experiencing Same Issue - Where I am At on It

I have the same issue with the same car. Here is what we have done to attempt to correct the problem:


  • Changed Fuel Filter (Old one was filled with particulates and gunk, after a Seafoam Treatment)
  • Changed Coil Pack, Wires, and Plugs
  • Added Marvel Mystery Oil to the Gas
So far the problem has quieted down from what it was. When the engine starts to stick, or act as if it has no gas, I push the accelerator down until the RPMs are at 3000 - 3500. This is not a constant recommendation. What is happening, is that the particulates are getting spit out of the injectors through the exhaust as I open the ports further with higher acceleration.

One step that has helped is to put the car in neutral and set the emergency brake all the way. (Also hold the brakes down if you feel unsafe) Then I rev the engine slowly from the base idle of 600 RPM to a gradual increase up to 3500 RPM. As I am doing this I listen for hesitation, belt slipping, grinding or any other probable noises. So far I have heard several particulates jam up in the injectors and then clear out.

I believe that running the tank low on fuel several times in a row, combined with the Seafoam may have gummed up the fuel system, and gave me these errors. Please let me know what you find out. I will update this post when I have further tests.

- Dave - Dma Customs
 

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Update on Issue - 07-20-11

Ok I was able to run the car at work yesterday (Dominoes Delivery Driver), with varying issues. I haven't had a complete stall yet but the computer in the car is starting to register codes that can be read at the Advance Auto Store.

Here is what I have found out:

  • Originally the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) had caused an error of reading low.
  • This was accompanied by an error logged on the CMP (Camshaft Position Sensor.
  • Since the last test - The TPS starting working fine, but the CMP is still erroring out.
So I purchased a new CMP Sensor at the auto store, as Ebay and other avenues didn't have a cheaper alternative. Installing it however, is a whole other ordeal. I recommend having your computer checked (if there are any visable warning lights on the dash) to help diagnose your particular issue.

I will add some URL's to this post to help you better understand the location of the sensor.

According to 'Haynes' Repair Manual for this car and engine (Code U), the CMP serves the following purpose:

  • It sends a voltage pulse signal to the PCM (Performance Control Module).
  • This tells the system when the number 1 piston is approaching Top Dead Center (TDC) on the compression stroke.
  • The system uses this information to syncronize the fuel injectors so that the engine gets the right amount of gas (in combo with the Mass Air-Flow Sensor), at the right time (Via the CMP).
So for my situation this might fix the issue. It certainly sounds likely. Let you know what happens.

- Dave
 
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